WUNC Music

WUNC Music is a place for music discovery

Listen to our music stream with the web player at the top of this page, on the WUNC App (iOS or Android), via TuneIn or on our HD2 channel in the Triangle area.

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What makes a song personal? Obviously, songwriters are often confessional, but only some go deep enough to expose bone. They're as likely to mine details from distant sources: fiction, overheard conversations, someone else's memories. A listener can make anything personal, anyway, so maybe the question's moot. If a soda commercial is playing while you fall in love, it's your song.

For more than four decades, Jonathan Demme threaded a diverse path through the film industry — beginning as a publicist, filming everything from documentaries to comedic sendups, and finally earning the status of Oscar-winning elder statesman. He was 73.

The director died Wednesday in Manhattan from complications of esophageal cancer. His publicist, 42 West, confirmed Demme's death to NPR.

Demme made films such as The Silence of the Lambs and Stop Making Sense that have helped define their respective genres.

You'll need a few viewings to make any sense out of the new Father John Misty video for "Total Entertainment Forever." The song is, at least in part, an indictment against popular culture, the blind adoration of pop stars and the rampant obsession with virtual reality.

This isn't the easiest time to enter the job market, especially not when so many opportunities are drying up in fields ranging from coal mining to retail.

Ty Segall's new head-spinning video for the song "Break A Guitar" opens with a very brief cameo by Fred Armisen, before bursting into an ever-growing swirl of Kaleidoscopic images.

Friday night at the Carolina Theatre in Durham, the Cat's Cradle presents the North Carolina premiere of the concert film "Thank You, Friends." The movie's name comes from a Big Star song from Third (the band's third album). The movie documents an on-going, star-studded tribute to the band.

Dom (left) and Jerron backstage at a Tribute to LeadBelly at Carnegie Hall in February 2016
Vania Kindard

The young folk musician Jerron Paxton defies easy categorization.  He grew up in a west coast metropolis, but his family and community adhered to customs from the rural south. And, like a number of people in Los Angeles with Louisiana roots, he inherited a combination of African-American, American Indian, and Jewish heritage. Paxton plays acoustic music that reflects these origins, with a focus on solo fiddle, guitar, and banjo. He also has a passion for telling his family’s story: 

Michael O'Brien

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time, Eric Hodge sits down with Jody Stephens of Big Star to discuss the band's classic song 'September Gurls.'

Katie Crutchfield has been nothing but honest as Waxahatchee. Her careful words carry keen insight — and she writes sharp songs to match. Waxahatchee's fourth album, Out In The Storm, takes a hard look not just at broken relationship, but also at the spiraling aftermath.

A picture of Mike Doughty
Rachelandthecity / Chartroom Media

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

On this episode, Eric Hodge sits down with Mike Doughty to talk about his song "Brian" from the album The Heart Watches While The Brain Burns.

"Brian" is a based on an East African beat, and Doughty goes in depth discussing how his travels to the region influenced his songwriting.

Listen to the episode here:

WUNC's Back Porch Music On The Lawn For 2017

Apr 9, 2017
Back Porch Music on the Lawn Logo
WUNC / American Tobacco

The days are getting longer and the weather's warming up.  It's that time of year again for WUNC's Back Porch Music On The Lawn.

The free outdoor concerts, an annual Triangle tradition, are held beneath the Lucky Strike water tower at American Tobacco Campus in Durham.

We've got eight great shows for your spring and summer Thursday evenings. All shows begin at 6 p.m.

A couple summers ago, Sarah Kinlaw of the Brooklyn indie-rock band SOFTSPOT was on a boat off the coast of North Carolina with her father. A sudden thunderstorm swept in, disrupting the previously calm waters — and inspiring the song "Maritime Law," which appears on SOFTSPOT's new album, Clearing.

Growing up, punk rocker Laura Jane Grace always felt conflicted about gender. She tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that she felt like two "twin souls" were warring inside of her, fighting for control. "I thought that I was quite possibly schizophrenic," she says.

It wasn't until Grace was 19 that she heard the term "transgender" and had a context for what she was feeling. In 2012, at the age of 31, she transitioned from male to female.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time Eric Hodge speaks with Rick Miller of Southern Culture On The Skids about the song "Freak Flag" off of the band's 2016 album The Electric Pinecones.

WUNC Mill Music Sessions At Rocky Mount Mills

Mar 22, 2017
WUNC, Schoolkids Records & Rocky Mount Mills

The following is a WUNC announcement:

WUNC has formed a partnership with Schoolkids Records on a new, free concert series at Rocky Mount Mills. In the tradition of the Back Porch Music on the Lawn Series these concerts are designed to both celebrate North Carolina’s rich musical heritage and provide families a fun night out.

Kaia Kater
Polina Mourzina

The birth of the Carolina Chocolate Drops at the 2005 Black Banjo Gathering at Appalachian State University has become the stuff of folk music legend. “Of course it was an academic event,” Dom Flemons notes of the conference, “but it was also based on the idea of confirming that you weren’t the only one out there.” Once launched, the Drops’ music spread like wildfire. With it emerged a new public appreciation of the African American roots of old-time, bluegrass, and country music.

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