Dave DeWitt

Scientists Turning Tide In Battle Against Invasive Hemlock Pest

The hunt for the hemlock woolly adelgid begins in an unexpected place, tucked between a golf-course community and the Koka Booth Amphitheater in Cary. It's hardly the setting for a tree and a pest that prefers cool mountain air.
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At One Juvenile Hall, Too Few Staff Has A Big Impact

Across the country, there are efforts to close outdated and dangerous juvenile detention centers. But even in places with so-called model juvenile halls, counties often struggle to meet the minimum standards.A juvenile hall in San Leandro, Calif., is one such detention center that's generally well-regarded but faces some major challenges. Built in 2007, it's part of a $176 million juvenile justice complex with a detention facility, courtrooms and law offices."This is essentially where all of...
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An image of the Carter-Simmons House in Duplin County
North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

North Carolina is full of historic sites. Approximately 75,000 properties are on the National Register of Historic Places, according to North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

Image of P. Murali Doraiswamy
Duke University

More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer's and new evidence that suggests women's brains are especially vulnerable to the disease.

Image of the Russell School, the last Rosenwald School in Durham County.
Phyllis Mack Horton

In the early 20th century, Sears Roebuck CEO Julius Rosenwald teamed up with educator and civil rights icon Booker T. Washington to bring formal education to African-Americans in the rural South.

Image of Eric Trundy, who has used comedy as a therapy for a traumatizing childhood.
Eric Trundy

 

Up-and-coming standup comic Eric Trundy says that comedy saved his life, and he means that in the most literal sense of the words. His childhood was filled with trauma, from physical and sexual abuse to abandonment, and he repressed those memories for many years.

Image of Nnenna Freelon, who stars in 'The Clothesline Muse'
Chris Charles

Clotheslines were once a part of everyday life for most American families. Women would often gather at community clotheslines, and neighbors in high rise buildings chatted over shared clotheslines hanging between their apartments. 

The new multimedia theatrical production “The Clothesline Muse” explores the history and culture of the clothesline, and looks at what it can tell us about changing community structure and relationships.

Image of Pat Cohen
Music Maker Tintype, Tim Duffy and Aaron Greenhood

The Music Maker Relief Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping true pioneers and forgotten heroes of the blues gain recognition as well as meet their day-to-day needs.

The foundation teamed up with Duke Performances to commemorate their 20th anniversary with a series of summer concerts.

A picture of a woman with a bathtub balance seat.
Richard Duncan / CDC

North Carolina's population is aging quickly, increasing the demand for personal caregivers. But a report from a poverty advocacy organization says elderly people might have trouble finding reliable care unless caregivers' wages increase.

An image of former NCDOT Secretary Tony Tata
NCDOTcommunications / Flickr Creative Commons

Tony Tata  is resigning from his post as North Carolina Department of Transportation Secretary to pursue other endeavors. Governor Pat McCrory abruptly announced the resignation this morning in a release.

Tata said he will spend more time with family and writing fiction books. In an interview set to air Wednesday night on Time Warner Cable, Tata was asked about a possible run for Congress in 2016.

A teenager locking down a summer job as a lifeguard used to be a big deal.

But this summer, several parks and recreation departments and YMCA's across the country are reporting a shortage of lifeguards. And an improving economy may be playing a big role.

The Ridge Road swimming pool in Raleigh, N.C. is packed. There are easily 200 people here competing in a swim meet, some of them as young as 5 years old.

An image of the 2015 Youth Radio group
Charlie Shelton / WUNC

A group of teenage reporters is adding the final touches to their stories this week as a part of WUNC's Youth Reporting Institute. The interviews are transcribed, the scripts have been written and each piece of the story is getting its last polish. As they finish up their summers jobs at WUNC, the youth reporters took some time to reflect and preview what listeners should anticipate hearing on the air in the coming weeks.

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On The State of Things

Image of Eric Trundy, who has used comedy as a therapy for a traumatizing childhood.
Eric Trundy

Making Comedy From Tragedy

Up-and-coming standup comic Eric Trundy says that comedy saved his life, and he means that in the most literal sense of the words. His childhood was filled with trauma, from physical and sexual abuse to abandonment, and he repressed those memories for many years. But after his kids were grown, he often experienced suicidal thoughts and could not avoid the debilitating psychological pain anymore. He quit his full-time job to and headed into the comedy club. He says that once he got on stage...
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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.

Political Campaigns Go Social, But Email Is Still King

Presidential campaigns cost a lot of money these days — perhaps as much as $5 billion could be spent in the next election, by one estimate.Much of that will be spent on television advertising in battleground states, as expected. But spending on digital campaigning — that is, everything on a computer, smartphone or tablet — could tally as much as $1 billion by the time election day rolls around.With all that money, the campaigns are making big changes in their digital strategies — including...
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