An image of a 'smart' insulin patch
UNC School of Medicine/ UNC Health Care

'Smart' Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For People With Diabetes

Pricking your finger and meticulously checking your blood sugar could no longer be the only way people with diabetes handle the disease. Researches from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and N.C. State University are working to replace this painful process with a thin square patch the size of a penny.
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Measuring The Power Of A Prison Education

The Obama administration Friday is taking a small step toward expanding adult prisoners' access to federal Pell grants. The money would help pay for college-level classes behind bars.Federal and state prisoners have been ineligible for the grants since Congress banned the practice two decades ago. But the Education and Justice Departments today will announce a limited pilot program that gets around the ban — at least on a temporary, experimental basis. The goal is to test the effectiveness of...
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Stethoscope
jasleen_kaur / Flickr Creative Commons

Scientists have set their sights on finding a cure for AIDS. At the opening of the International AIDS Society conference in Vancouver, AIDS researchers made a call to action for a worldwide shift in HIV treatment.

They now suggest that doctors provide medication immediately after a diagnosis instead of first waiting for the signs of illness to appear.

Cold Frame

Jul 31, 2015
Image of PT Deutermann, who is a former captain in the Navy and arms control specialist with the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Cynthia Brann

P.T. Deutermann spent 26 years in the Navy and working for the government. As a captain in the Navy and an arms control specialist on the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Deutermann developed many skills.

When that career ended, he began writing military fiction and has published 18 novels.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Deutermann, a North Carolina resident, about his latest title “Cold Frame” (St. Martin’s Press/2015), a government drama in the age of counterterrorism.

Folk Musician Malcolm Holcombe

Jul 31, 2015
Image of Malcolm Holcombe playing guitar
John Gellman

Malcolm Holcombe was born and raised in the mountains of western North Carolina. His rugged voice and insistent guitar are the marks of a true folk musician who runs on clear passion.

  He embarks on a North American tour next month, but first he performs in Hickory on Saturday, August 1 at 8 p.m. at the Acoustic Stage.

Host Frank Stasio talks to Holcombe about his life and music.

Set List:

"Pitiful Blues" (starts at 3:59)

An image of the Carter-Simmons House in Duplin County
North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

North Carolina is full of historic sites. Approximately 75,000 properties are on the National Register of Historic Places, according to North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

Image of P. Murali Doraiswamy
Duke University

More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer's and new evidence that suggests women's brains are especially vulnerable to the disease.

Image of the Russell School, the last Rosenwald School in Durham County.
Phyllis Mack Horton

In the early 20th century, Sears Roebuck CEO Julius Rosenwald teamed up with educator and civil rights icon Booker T. Washington to bring formal education to African-Americans in the rural South.

Image of Eric Trundy, who has used comedy as a therapy for a traumatizing childhood.
Eric Trundy

 

Up-and-coming standup comic Eric Trundy says that comedy saved his life, and he means that in the most literal sense of the words. His childhood was filled with trauma, from physical and sexual abuse to abandonment, and he repressed those memories for many years.

Lethal injection room
Wikipedia Creative Commons

Doctors in North Carolina would no longer be required to oversee or participate in executions under a bill heading to Governor Pat McCrory's desk.

House lawmakers gave final approval to the measure Wednesday that allows physician assistants, nurse practitioners or paramedics to oversee executions.

Dave DeWitt

The hunt for the hemlock woolly adelgid begins in an unexpected place, tucked between a golf-course community and the Koka Booth Amphitheater in Cary. It's hardly the setting for a tree and a pest that prefers cool mountain air.

An image of mandolin player Jeff Austin
Dorothy St. Claire Photography

The Back Porch Music on the Lawn series rolls on Thursday, June 30  with a mandolin player igniting a bluegrass group, along with a slick banjo and violin duo.

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On The State of Things

Image of Eric Trundy, who has used comedy as a therapy for a traumatizing childhood.
Eric Trundy

Making Comedy From Tragedy

Up-and-coming standup comic Eric Trundy says that comedy saved his life, and he means that in the most literal sense of the words. His childhood was filled with trauma, from physical and sexual abuse to abandonment, and he repressed those memories for many years. But after his kids were grown, he often experienced suicidal thoughts and could not avoid the debilitating psychological pain anymore. He quit his full-time job to and headed into the comedy club. He says that once he got on stage...
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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.

Meet The California Family That Has Made Health Policy Its Business

If there's such a thing as the first family of health care, the Lees may be it.Five decades ago, two brothers helped start Medicare. Their father inspired them and they, in turn, have inspired the next generation.To mark the anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson signing Medicare into law on July 30, 1965, three Lees sat down to reflect on the U.S. health care system.It can be hard now to imagine a time when Medicare met serious opposition. But 92-year-old Dr. Peter Lee, a founder of the...
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