Image of lethal injection table
Ken Piorkowski / Flickr Creative Commons

State Senate Approves Measure That Could Restart Executions

Legal challenges to the death penalty in North Carolina have effectively stayed any executions since 2006. This week, lawmakers look to change that with a bill that would allow any medical professional, not just doctors, to administer a lethal injection.
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For Arizona Mining Towns, A Diverse Economy Is A Good Economy

Since 1875, the town of Superior, Arizona, has relied on copper mining to drive its economy. That reliance has come at a cost though, as many of Superiors residents have lived through several cycles of mines opening and closing. But town officials are now hoping to put an end to that cycle. Carrie Jung from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports. Read more via KJZZ Reporter Carrie Jung, reporter for KJZZ in Phoenix. She tweets @Jung_Carrie. Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit src="http://www...
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Image of Sydney Scherr, who is a jeweler and professor now working with victims of sex trafficking.
Sydney Scherr

For many victims of sex trafficking, the struggle continues after escaping the industry. Without skills to earn a livelihood, they may turn to prostitution.

Jeweler and professor Sydney Scherr started a project to teach sustainable jewelry design to victims of sex trafficking. She leads groups of students to instruct and create designs through simple techniques so that they can earn a living. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Scherr and two students involved in the project: Ezatul Mazwe Muhammad Arif and Hanson Foong.

An image of bikers along the Dixie Pass Trail
Ed Billings / Bike Loud Troop 845

The members of Carrboro’s Boy Scout Troop 845 dipped their rear wheels in the Pacific Ocean in Oregon and repeated their chosen mantra: bike loud. With the wind at their backs and passion in their pedals, they began riding east with everything they had.

Image of Glen Warren and his three children
Glen Warren

Glen Warren vividly remembers the first moments of single fatherhood: he was standing in the living room of his new mobile home with his three kids, and he quickly realized that he had no idea how to make them dinner. 

In the coming years he learned how to piece together meals, filed for child support, and worked multiple jobs to put food on the table. And through all of this, he became increasingly certain about one thing: fatherhood is incredibly important. 

Federal Building Winston-Salem
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Fierce testimony from experts and disenfranchised voters has been delivered in a Winston-Salem courtroom during the first two weeks of a federal trial challenging North Carolina's controversial new voting law.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie.
kenrudinpolitics.com

Republican Sen. Thom Tillis skipped out on a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing about ISIS last week and instead met privately with former Vice President Dick Cheney. This follows Tillis’ loud campaign criticism of former Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan for her attendance record at meetings related to ISIS.

Meanwhile, Gov. Pat McCrory has signed a bill that widely protects Confederate monuments in the state. 

A Thinking Man's Comedian, Stewart Huff

Jul 24, 2015
Image of Stewart Huff
Jonathan Baldizon

Stewart Huff brings a different perspective and insight to stand up comedy. He uses philosophical and historical themes in his comedy, and that is on purpose.

He says his main goal is not to make you laugh, but to make you think. But don't worry, he will slide in a few jokes. Stewart is also a writer for Adult Swim and won "Best of the Fest" at the Aspen Comedy Festival.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Stewart Huff about his comedic themes and the long pauses they often induce.

Minimum Wage, Home Care Workers
Leoneda Inge

From California to New York, a minimum wage increase to $15 an hour is becoming more of a reality.  Durham workers rallied Thursday in support.

Most of the people rallying outside a McDonald’s restaurant in Downtown Durham were longtime home care and child care workers, like Tolanda Barnette.   Barnette says after more than a decade of working in child care in North Carolina, she still only makes $10 an hour.

“We do the hardest and the most work in the child care center and we are the least and most underpaid," said Barnette.

An image of the music group Future Islands
Tim Saccenti

Future Islands might have bumped up its fan base after impressing David Letterman last year with vocalist Sam Herring's stirring dance moves and contagious energy when it performed "Seasons (Waiting on You)."

But the synth-rock group has been performing together for more than a decade, and is getting ready to do its 1,000th show Sunday at the Carrboro Town Commons.

Years before appearing on Letterman, or signing onto acclaimed record label 4AD, Future Islands met in an art program at East Carolina University. Herring said the trio connected immediately.

A picture of the NCNG logo.
North Carolina National Guard

The N.C. National Guard will commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II with a ceremony Friday honoring 16 members of the 30th Infantry Division.

Six soldiers from the division were awarded the Medal of Honor for their service in World War II. Then-General Dwight Eisenhower's staff ranked the 30th as the top infantry division in the European theater.

Its contemporaries still honor the division.

Image of stethoscope
Dr. Farouk / Flickr Creative Commons

People who live in rural North Carolina are still more likely to suffer from serious health problems than their urban counterparts. Rural counties show higher rates of heart disease and obesity, and rural residents have a lower life expectancy.

The recent closures of rural hospitals around the state makes those residents even more vulnerable. Research shows that systemic problems like slow economic development and spotty insurance coverage also contribute to rural health disparities.

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On The State of Things

Author Lori Horvitz at age 14 as an amateur magician
Lori Horvitz

Lori Horvitz: A Fiction Writer Turned Non-Fiction

For most of us, our coming-of-age stories start and end during our years in high school or college. They are defined by strong relationships, rebellion and that awkward junior prom. But for author Lori Horvitz the coming-of-age story was decades in the making. When she finished writing it, the product was a collection of comedic essays that covered her childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Each tells the story of her search for identity as a quiet, Jewish Long Island girl who was exploring...
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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.

Political Campaigns Go Social, But Email Is Still King

Presidential campaigns cost a lot of money these days — perhaps as much as $5 billion could be spent in the next election, by one estimate.Much of that will be spent on television advertising in battleground states, as expected. But spending on digital campaigning — that is, everything on a computer, smartphone or tablet — could tally as much as $1 billion by the time election day rolls around.With all that money, the campaigns are making big changes in their digital strategies — including...
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