Winston-Salem

A church in Winston-Salem is ending its partnership with the Boy Scouts of America after more than 60 years. Earlier this week leaders at Calvary Baptist Church released a video announcing the decision.  The National organization announced this spring it would remove a restriction denying membership to youths based on sexual orientation. Calvary Baptist is part of the Old Hickory Council, which covers eight counties in the state. It is not the first church to end a chartered partnership.

“We know, I’m going to say three to five right now, some are still in the process of deliberations right now; but three to five out of 135 or so charter organizations who are, or may be ending their relationship with scouting,” said Steve Wilburn, Scout Executive for the Old Hickory Council, which includes eight counties. Leaders from the church declined to do a recorded interview.

Faye Hunter was the bassist for 80's band Let's Active.
Faye Hunter, Facebook

The Winston-Salem community mourns the loss of local musician Faye Hunter, who was found dead in on Saturday of an apparent suicide. She was 59 years old. Hunter was the bassist in the 80’s band Let’s Active, which was led by Mitch Easter. Yesterday on "Here & Now," host Jeremy Hobson interviewed Easter about his former bandmate.

HanesBrands is based in Winston-Salem.
HanesBrands

Winston-Salem based HanesBrands is buying bra maker Maidenform for approximately $547 million. The deal would add several brands to the company's already existing line of Playtex, Wonderbra and Hanes. The company hopes the acquisition will increase profits as well as production.

Seal of Winston-Salem
City of Winston-Salem

  The Rhino Times has been the signature conservative newspaper in the Triad since January of 1992. But it’s recently announced its closing, after 21 years of service. In other news, today marks the centennial anniversary of the joining of Winston and Salem, to become Winston-Salem.

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, hospital
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Thousands of employees at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem will be affected by several cost-cutting measures. The hospital is planning to freeze some hiring, reduce retirement contributions and ask employees to voluntarily take furloughs.

Winston-Salem Police armored car
Walt Unks / Winston-Salem Journal

The largest law enforcement agencies in the state are being questioned about their use of military style weapons, technology and arrest tactics.  The North Carolina American Civil Liberties Union has sent public records requests to 62 law enforcement agencies.

“One of the reasons that we were very interested in sending out these public records requests, we learned that Gaston County had a drone.  And that was a big revelation,” says state ACLU director Chris Brook.

A gun-rights group is suing the city of Winston-Salem over what it claims are unconstitutional restrictions of concealed weapons.

Two years ago the general assembly gave cities the ability to regulate concealed handguns at county and municipal recreational facilities. Winston-Salem leaders defined recreational facilities as playgrounds, swimming pools, athletic fields and athletics facilities. Of the city's 69 parks, concealed handguns are prohibited in parts or all of 52.

A nutrition and skin care company has selected Winston-Salem as the site for its new east coast manufacturing plant. Herbalife will bring nearly 500 new jobs to the city.

The California based company chose a Winston-Salem plant that was previously occupied by Dell. The computer maker couldn't meet certain job thresholds and later returned all of the economic incentives it received from the City and County. Herbalife is purchasing the facility from Dell for $22 million, less than half of the property's value. Mayor Allen Joines.

A church from the 1890s is being disassembled and moved to Chapel Hill this month.

For more than 120 years St. Phillips Church has been in Germanton, a small town north of Winston-Salem. Now, the Episcopal Church of the Advocate is bringing it to Chapel Hill. Reverend Lisa Fischbeck says the unconventional move will cost about $250,000.

Before the 1970s, opportunities for Black women in film were limited. African-American actresses were often relegated to roles as “mammies” or “tragic mulattos.”

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