War

photo of David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna
Monika Evstatieva / NPR via AP

An NPR photojournalist and an Afghan translator were killed in Afghanistan this week by Taliban forces. David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna were traveling in Southern Afghanistan when their convoy came under attack. Two other NPR staff were unharmed. David Gilkey is the second American journalist to die in the Afghanistan conflict.

Leesa Jones

The story of the American Civil War is often told through famous battles and important generals. But that narrative doesn’t accurately represent North Carolina’s civil war story. In this state, the impact of the civil war was felt more on the homefront, within the homes, families and communities of ordinary people. The North Carolina Museum of History has begun an effort to pay tribute to these lesser-known Civil War stories through the North Carolina Civil War History Center, set to open in 2020.

Image of writer and performer Aaron Davidman.
Ken Friedman

Aaron Davidman grew up on the West Coast in a progressive Jewish family, with a specific understanding of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

A moment from Grounded, a one-woman show featuring Madeleine Lambert.
Jon Haas

After an unexpected pregnancy, an F-16 pilot gets reassigned to a desk job: flying drones from an armchair in a windowless trailer in Nevada.

christophermcelroen.com

    

   

War. The country has been engaged in it for the last decade, and yet the majority of the population knows it as little more than images on a screen.

https://twitter.com/JayinKabul

    

The American military is drawing down forces in Afghanistan.

As troops depart and resources return home, on-the-ground media coverage of the conflict winds down as well. Reporter Jay Price has covered the country on three different tours. He also covered the war in Iraq for the News & Observer and its parent company, McClatchy Newspapers.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Jay Price about his experiences as a war correspondent and his unique perspective on America’s conflicts.

photo of Congress
Lawrence Jackson, whitehouse.gov.

Several of North Carolina’s members of Congress have issued statements about  U.S. involvement in Syria. The statements follow a chemical weapons attack which the U.S. says was carried out by the Assad regime in Damascus on August 21. More than 1,400 people were reported killed in the attack.

Senators Richard Burr and Kay Hagan, as well as several Representatives have made the following statements. We'll update this post with additional statements as they come in.