Voting

Patricia Timmons-Goodson
Duke University Law School

This summer President Obama appointed former North Carolina Supreme Court Justice Patricia Timmons-Goodson to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.  The Commission, an eight member panel, is charged with developing federal civil rights policy.  

Timmons-Goodson was the first African American female appointed to the North Carolina Supreme Court.  She spoke with  Phoebe Judge about the shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown and changes in North Carolina's voting rights laws, among other topics.

voting sign
Flickr creative commons

Appalachian State University will not have a early voting site on campus for this year's general election. 

The state Board of Elections denied a request from Watauga County Board of Elections member Kathleen Campbell, who submitted a separate early voting plan from the two other members. 

Early Voting
Leoneda Inge

Opponents of the state's new voting law are planning their next steps after a judge refused to put the law on hold for the November election. A district judge on Friday denied a preliminary injunction for a law limiting the number of early voting days and getting rid of same-day registration at the polls.

Advocates will decide this week whether or not to appeal the decision. Either way, leaders say they are directing their attention to boots-on-the-ground efforts.

Keith Ivey / Flickr/Creative Commons

North Carolina voters are choosing their candidates for a competitive U.S. Senate seat, the state Supreme Court and dozens of other state and federal offices.  Local election workers planned to open more than 2,700 precinct locations today.

Eight Republicans are seeking their party's nomination to challenge Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan. She has her own primary against two lesser-known opponents.

Supreme Court Associate Justice Robin Hudson has two challengers for her seat. The top two vote-getters advance to the November election. 

Vote
Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons/Flickr

Early voting begins today for the May primary election.

Today is the first day North Carolinians can cast their votes in this year's primary election. 289 sites across the state will be open for residents to come to the polls. That's 77 more locations than in 2010.

NC General Assembly

Changes detailed in the state's new voting law now allow bigger donations for candidates. 

Political office seekers were able to start padding their campaign war chests once the calendar changed to 2014.  Candidates for any office can now accept up to $5,000 from a single contributor.  Before the new year, the contribution limit for most donors was $4,000.  Judicial candidates could only accept $1,000 per supporter. 

Photo: Rosanell Eaton and Mary E. Perry
Jorge Valencia

A federal judge has ruled that challenges to the North Carolina law that requires voters to show identification at polling stations will not be heard until after the mid-term elections of 2014.

U.S. District Court Magistrate Judge Joi Elizabeth Peake said in a a hearing Thursday that the law was too complex to be thoroughly reviewed prior to the November elections. Peake scheduled a trial for July 2015.

Attorneys on both sides of four lawsuits challenging voting rules signed into law by North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory this year are scheduled to meet in U.S. District Court on Thursday morning to argue over an opening date for the trial.

The two sides disagree on whether a trial should be heard before the 2014 mid-term elections. The plaintiffs, which include the North Carolina NAACP and the League of Women Voters, are asking the court to schedule for trial in August 2014. The attorneys representing the state are asking for a begin date no earlier than January 2015.

Photo: Rev. William Barber of the N.C. NAACP called for pickets outside Rose and Maxwell stores, which are owned by the family of state Budget Director Art Pope.
Jorge Valencia

The Rev. William Barber, who led weekly protests this year against laws passed by North Carolina’s Republican-controlled legislature, gathered with a few of his supporters Monday outside the state budget office to criticize a man they say supports policies that hurt poor people.

Fayetteville, NC
City of Fayetteville

Municipal elections take place Tuesday across the state. Just a fraction of registered voters are expected to help decide mayoral races, city council candidacies and one significant school bond measure.

The education referendum is on the ballot in Johnston County. There voters will decide whether or not to allocate $64 million for a school construction bond. Johnston is the second fastest-growing district in the state and leaders say money is needed to provide for the additional student population. There is no organized opposition to the measure.

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