Window and Wooden Boards
Sherrie Thai /

The city of Durham is no longer using plywood to cover up windows and doors in abandoned buildings.

Faith Gardner works for city's Neighborhood Improvement Services Department.

"If you're living in a neighborhood with boarded structures, they don't look good, you can tell that they've been abandoned, there's also an attraction there for criminal activity."

Gardner says a new, clear, polycarbonate material has been installed in ten vacant homes, with more to come. She adds that it improves the appearance of the buildings and allows police to look inside.

Photo: A four-way highway intersection at sunset
Flickr user Tom

The North Carolina Senate has tentatively approved a bill that would allow police to use photo cameras on state roads to track license plates.

The idea is that the cameras would take pictures of license plates, and police could use them to, for example, find a fugitive. Sen. Gladys Robinson (D-Guilford) says that could have helped Guilford County investigators on a recent case.

"Had this technology been available, at a right of way, it would've been possible to track down the individual who had committed the crime," Robinson says.

CAM Raleigh

Surveying the Terrain,” a new exhibition at Raleigh’s Contemporary Art Museum, CAM, uses surveillance and mapping tools towards artistic ends. 

The artists in the exhibition traded in their paintbrushes and canvases in favor of Google Earth, satellite images, and aerial photographs.  Brooklyn-based artist Matthew Jensen used Google Street view for his project 49 States, visiting every state except Hawaii.