StoryCorps

Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha and Razan Abu-Salha were shot and killed in a Chapel Hill apartment complex.
deah.barakat / facebook.com

Administrators at Al-Iman School in Raleigh where Yusor Abu-Salha, Razan Abu-Salha and Deah Barakat studied elementary and middle schools are creating a scholarship and awards fund in their memory.

The endowment, called "Our Three Winners," will be announced at an annual fundraiser on Saturday.

Yusor, her sister, Razan, and Yusor's husband, Barakat, were shot and killed in their Chapel Hill apartment on February 10. Prosecutors charged their neighbor, Craig Stephen Hicks, with three counts of first degree murder. They will seek the death penalty in the case.

Yusor Abu-Salha was killed Tuesday night, along with her husband Deah Barakat and her sister Razan Abu-Salha.
StoryCorps

Thousands of people gathered on the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill campus last night to remember three students who were shot to death on Tuesday: Yusor Abu-Salha, Razan Abu-Salha and Deah Barakat.

Last year, Yusor came to the StoryCorps booth in Durham with her former elementary school teacher Mussarut Jabeen.  Jabeen is principal of Al-Iman School in Raleigh.  During the StoryCorps interview, the two women discussed their lives, hopes and dreams for the future.

'I'm Not Broken'

Feb 6, 2015
John and Cassie Rice
StoryCorps

John Rice graduated from East Chapel Hill High School and went to college but he dropped out to join the Marines Corps. Rice insisted on infantry, and was assigned to a special operations unit that deployed to Iraq in 2008. Three months into his tour, he was injured.

He told the story to his wife Cassie at the StoryCorps booth in Durham, North Carolina. 

The NASCAR Hall of Fame inducts an African-American driver for the first time Friday night.

Wendell Scott drove during the Jim Crow era, and he was the first African-American to win a race at NASCAR's elite major league level. He died in 1990.

Scott's career began in 1952, and his racing team was his family. They would travel to races together from their home in Virginia, and his sons served as his pit crew.

Photo of Former State of Things Producer Meghan Modafferi and Producer Anita Rao try out sitting on the other side of the glass in "host attire" on Meghan's last day.
Jorge Valencia

As 2014 comes to a close, The State of Things producer Anita Rao takes a look back at some of her favorite segments from the show this year. 

This Christmas Eve people all over the world will log on to the official Santa Tracker to follow his progress through U.S. military radar. This all started in 1955, with a misprint in a Colorado Springs newspaper and a call to Col. Harry Shoup's secret hotline at the Continental Air Defense Command, now known as NORAD.

Shoup's children, Terri Van Keuren, 65, Rick Shoup, 59, and Pam Farrell, 70, recently visited StoryCorps to talk about how the tradition began.

When an assisted living home in California shut down last fall, many of its residents were left behind, with nowhere to go.

The staff at the Valley Springs Manor left when they stopped getting paid — except for cook Maurice Rowland and Miguel Alvarez, the janitor.

"There was about 16 residents left behind, and we had a conversation in the kitchen, 'What are we going to do?' " Rowland says.

"If we left, they wouldn't have nobody," the 34-year-old Alvarez says.

Their roles quickly transformed for the elderly residents, who needed round-the-clock care.

'I Am Glad That You Dared Greatly'

Nov 21, 2014
Bonnie Hacker and Erin Nivens
StoryCorps

In 1979, Bonnie Hacker became one of the first single parents to adopt a child in the state of North Carolina.  Seven-year-old Erin moved in with Bonnie, first in a foster-care arrangement. The adoption process began shortly thereafter:

Edwin Lanier (left) with David Wright at StoryCorps in Durham, N.C.  2006
StoryCorps

StoryCorps fans might remember the stories told by Edwin "Eddie" Lanier, of battling alcoholism and finding peace. Lanier died on October 14th. He was 68. 

The first interview aired on NPR's Morning Edition in 2006. In that interview, Lanier talked with his friend David Wright. After almost drinking himself to death, Lanier had been sober for five years.

When he was a child, Lanier had been told by his father that alcoholism ran in the family.

Jim Goodmon with his son, Michael.
StoryCorps

American Brands closed the Lucky Strike tobacco factory in downtown Durham in 1987. It was still abandoned in 1995, when Jim Goodmon, President of Capitol Broadcasting Company, built the new Durham Bulls stadium across the street. Goodmon says he’d go to the baseball games and stare at the gigantic, abandoned warehouse. He eventually decided to try to bring it back to life, and he tells that story to his son, Michael.

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