The State of Things

WUNC's The State of Things brings the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you.  The State of Things Podcast presents new stories every weekday with topics from our show.  To subscribe:

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Switchpoint

Apr 11, 2012

Many people across the world don't have access to basic health care, but more than 90 percent of the population gets a mobile phone signal. Josh Nesbit, CEO of Medic Mobile, took advantage of that fact.

In 1976 Judy Hogan was a poet, editor and young mother when she founded Carolina Wren Press in her Chapel Hill Apartment. At the time, she was dismayed at how difficult it was for women and poets of color to publish their work. So she took the extraordinary leap of starting a press.

Uprooted Innocence

Apr 10, 2012

The United States has child labor laws to protect the safety of its children. However, these laws don't apply to the agriculture industry, where almost half a million children across the nation are employed.

Author Sharon Ewell Foster has been on the program before to discuss the extensive research she did into a bloody slave rebellion led by Nat Turner in 1831. She pored over court documents that, in the end, contradicted much of what has been recorded about the revolt and

Shades of Gray

Apr 10, 2012

Before September 11th, 2001, Andy Holloman owned a successful travel agency in the Triangle region of North Carolina. The murder of one of his clients, coupled with the collapse of his business, led him to

Meet Jimmy Creech

Apr 9, 2012

Jimmy Creech had been an ordained United Methodist minister for 14 years before he came to understand the plight of homosexuals within his congregation. A parishioner, whom he calls Adam, came out to him in 1984, revealing the hurt and rejection he felt at the hands of a church that condemned him.

NCCU Quiz Bowl

Apr 6, 2012

Quiz bowl is a competition of knowledge. The players train with the devotion of athletes, but they answer questions, rather than make baskets or score touchdowns. The Honda Campus All-Star Challenge is a quiz bowl circuit specifically for historically black colleges and universities, and North Carolina Central University has one of the best teams.

Midtown Dickens

Apr 6, 2012

Midtown Dickens' Kym Register and Catherine Edgerton have been friends since they were 16. They started making music together, even though they could barely play instruments at the time, and their first venues were living rooms, basements and parking decks.

Contraception, access to health care and representation in Congress are issues that motivated feminist activists in the early 1960s and, if Rush Limbaugh's recent time in the headlines is any indication, those issues persist. Women have been effecting social and political change across the South for more than a century, but, if you read the history of the women's movement in America, you'd think all of the action happened in the Northeast.

Full Frame

Apr 3, 2012

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival kicks off Thursday, April 12. Out of 1,200 films submitted in the New Docs category, only 60 were chosen for viewing.

One of them, “CatCam,” is a short film by first- time director Seth Keal. It’s the only movie at Full Frame this year that has the distinction of having sizable chunks of it shot by a cat. Host Frank Stasio talks to director Seth Keal about “CatCam” and the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival.

Lionel Shriver’s latest novel “The New Republic” (Harper/2012) tackles terrorism, journalism and the codependent relationship between the two.

David Haskell was inspired by the mandalas of Tibetan Buddhism to seek personal meditation out in nature. He sought out a one-square-meter plot of land in a Tennessee old-growth forest and observed it for a year.

Susan King thought she would spend her whole life in journalism. She did stints in local and national television news, as well as guest hosting gigs in public radio. But she eventually left journalism to join the government, and later switched careers again when

Saba Barnard is a Muslim-American artist who is pushing back against the common, one-note portrays of Muslims in mainstream art and media.

Horse racing is big business, but it's not a sport known for its racial diversity. However, if you look back before the 20th century, black jockeys dominated the sport. A new multimedia project called, "Too Black Too Fast," documents the contributions of African-Americans to horse racing. Host Frank Stasio discusses this forgotten history with project creator Michael McBride, an artist and instructor of art at Tennessee State University.

Onward Soldiers

Mar 30, 2012

The Wilmington-based band Onward Soldiers are an eclectic group. Their style of music depends on who you ask, but they are comfortable playing pop, rock and country.

Social Media & Social Change

Mar 29, 2012

This month, the San Diego-based nonprofit organization Invisible Children debuted a Web video campaign called “Kony 2012.” The short film aims to raise awareness about a man named Joseph Kony who has been responsible for kidnapping countless children in Northern Uganda and other areas in Central Africa for use in his rebel army.

What drives good behavior? It could be the satisfying feeling of helping others or, in many cases, there are even more alluring incentives to do the right thing. Is the value of goodness lessened when there is a reward involved?

One of the rules of the U.S. Census is that all names must be kept anonymous for 72 years. Historians, genealogists and demographers are eagerly awaiting next week’s big reveal of 1940 Census data - names included.

When Stephen Jaffe was a child, his parents forbade him and his siblings from pursuing a career in music. Now all three are professional musicians, and Jaffe is being inducted in the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Raleigh's own Public Policy Polling first established a reputation for accuracy in the 2008 presidential election, but they stay in news with their sense of humor.

More than a half century before 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida, another black teenager named Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi. “Dar He: The Lynching of Emmett Till” tells his story, with actor Mike Wiley playing all 36 roles in film.

Cellist Leyla McCalla was looking for creative inspiration when she left New York for New Orleans. She easily drew crowds on the streets of the Big Easy by performing classical music in a sea of jazz acts. Now, McCalla is working on recording an album of songs, some of which are inspired by the poetry of Langston Hughes.

After 110 years in Southeast Raleigh, the town's YWCA has closed. The staff was fired on just one day's notice, and the programs that served the community are gone. Journalist Cash Michaels has been following this story closely for the Carolinian newspaper. He joins host Frank Stasio to talk about the sudden closing and its impact in Raleigh.

Former CIA analyst Ray McGovern is worried that the United States is going to go to war with Iran. McGovern was an outspoken critic of the conflict in Iraq and he is afraid that a determined Israeli

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