SOT Live Music

Image of Second Line Stompers
Gregg Gelb

Note: this program is a rebroadcast. 

photo of Rissi Palmer
Rissi Palmer

Singer-songwriter Rissi Palmer exploded onto the country music scene in 2007 with a self-titled album. She sang alongside Taylor Swift and Lady Antebellum, and her single "Country Girl" was the first song by an African-American woman artist to make the country Billboard charts in almost two decades.

Durham trumpeter Al Strong has released his debut solo album, 'LoveStrong Vol. 1.'
Chris Charles / Creative Silence

This is a rebroadcast.

Al Strong started playing music when he was seven years old after his dad got him a drum set for Christmas.

He bounced from the drums to piano, and eventually landed on the trumpet. Throughout high school and college, he studied jazz. Now, he teaches the next generation of trumpeters at N.C. Central University in Durham.

An image of jazz vocalist Charenee Wade
Charenee Wade

Jazz vocalist Charenee Wade began singing when she was 12 years old living in Brooklyn. She was inspired by artists like Sarah Vaughn and Christian McBride.

Her latest album is a collection of covers from Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson called “Offering: The Music of Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson.” 

Kristen Abigail Collective

Castle Wild represents a new chapter in Chris Hendricks’ life. After the Chris Hendricks Band broke up several years ago, he looked for a new creative outlet and challenge in his life.

He reconnected with college friend Andre DiMuzio and formed Castle Wild. The music moved away from the rock pop of the Chris Hendricks Band to a cross between singer-songwriter and modern synth pop.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Hendricks and DiMuzio. Hendricks performs vocals and guitar and Andre DiMuzio is on vocals and keys.

Image of Mount Moriah
Lissa Gotwals

North Carolina-based band Mount Moriah has been together for almost a decade.

Their latest record 'How to Dance,' marks a turning point, as they focus less on personal identity and more on looking outward to examine how mythical and spiritual experiences have shaped their direction.

They recorded this album in home studios with the help of long-time collaborators and friends who have supported them along the way. 

Ellis Dyson and the Shambles

For Ellis Dyson, there is something alluring about the music from the 1920s. He sees it as dirty, raw and mysterious.

With the help of fellow musicians at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dyson has blended the sounds of Dixieland jazz with themes of standard folk ballads to create a "whiskey folk" ensemble.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Dyson about the band's origins and influences as a young group channeling another era.

Flamenco originated in the 18th century in the Andalusia region of Spain and has grown since.
Angelica Escoto

Flamenco is an art form with a relatively unknown history. It was first documented in literature in the mid-1700s as a passionate, rhythmic, and rich tradition with firm roots in Andalusia, Spain.

The group Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana embodies this tradition and has been working to bring the spirit of flamenco to American audiences for more than three decades.

Charles Latham uses music to look at stability through employment and his own struggles in life.
Pat McGuire

Musician Charles Latham has seen many friends and family struggle in the current economic situation. Friends lost jobs and his parents lost their house in the housing crisis.

Latham combined these experiences with his own struggle making ends meet out of low-paying jobs to create music about the importance of the living wage. Finding stability through employment is a theme throughout Latham's music, as well as a goal he hopes his local community can achieve.

Mallarmé HIP ensemble
Marc Banka Photography

The biennial North Carolina HIP (Historically Informed Performance) Music Festival hosted by Mallarmé Chamber Players is back this year with expanded programming. The festival features Baroque music played on period string instruments, which tend to sound richer, mellower and less edgy than modern counterparts.

The Mallarmé Chamber Players will play a two-part concert called the Biber Bowl featuring the Rosary Sonatas, 16 movements interpreting events from the lives of Jesus and Mary.

Zoe Pictures

Professor Toon, a.k.a. Kurrell Rice, is ready to tell his story through rap.

Growing up in Baltimore, Toon and his family experienced domestic abuse for years at the hands of his stepfather. The family eventually fled to North Carolina. The experiences shaped how Toon approaches his own role as a father.

In his new album, "Take Notes," Toon explores his growth as a rapper, son and father. 

Building A Guitar From Scratch

Jan 12, 2016
Alex Edney (L) and Terry Fritz (R) discussing the bracing on the sides of a guitar.
Fritz and Edney Guitars

Terry Fritz had two loves for most of his life: playing guitar and woodworking. During a job change in 2006, a friend suggested he marry those two passions as a luthier. Fritz quickly fell in love with the process – the properties of wood necessary for a good guitar, how to fasten the neck, the geometry that shapes the timbre of an acoustic guitar, etc.

Tokyo Rosenthal (middle) poses with Roger Maris (left) and Mickey Mantle.
Tokyo Rosenthal

As Tokyo Rosenthal has grown older, he has had more and more conversations about death and dying. He’s also watched close friends and family members fall ill. All of this inspired his latest album “Afterlife”—a meditation on end-of-life issues released last September.

(L-R) Gabe Fox-Peck, Annie Bennett and Philip Norris. 'Lady and the Tramps' after winning the 2014 NCCU Jazz competition.
Lady and the Tramps

    

The jazz scene in the Triangle has been steadily gaining ground in the past few decades. The region’s musical talents include Grammy-nominated acts like Branford Marsalis and Nnenna Freelon as well as budding young musicians who are hoping to become the next generation of jazz stars.

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