Silent Sam

Lisa Philip / WUNC

The University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Board of Trustees held a public hearing Wednesday to gather opinions on Silent Sam. That’s the Confederate monument sitting near the entrance to the UNC campus that has become the focal point of protests and denouncements by students, faculty, and even entire university departments.

The Silent Sam monument stands prominently on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s campus. Protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the monument on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

Thirty-four faculty members of the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill School of Law have sent a letter to Chancellor Carol Folt urging the immediate removal of the Silent Sam Confederate monument.

University police stand watch inside a barricade around the Silent Sam Statue at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the statue on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

A New York-based law firm representing 12 students and a professor at North Carolina's flagship public university is pressing the school to remove a Confederate soldier statue.

Police surround a Confederate monument during a protest to remove the statue at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C., Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017.
Gerry Broome / AP

Hundreds of people rallied Tuesday night at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill campus in opposition of a Confederate statue known as Silent Sam.

A crowd gathered at the 'Silent Sam' statue at UNC - Chapel Hill on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Updated 11:45 a.m., August 23, 2017

Three people are facing charges related to a demonstration against a Confederate statue at the University of North Carolina.

The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee was removed from  the Duke University Chapel days after it was vandalized.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Duke University quickly and quietly removed a controversial statue from its most iconic building over the weekend.

Elena Ceberio

Hundreds have gathered across the Triangle in candlelight vigils for victims of the deadly attack in Charlottesville, Virginia. One day after a car plowed into a crowd of people counter-protesting a white supremacist rally, North Carolinians gathered at various sites to remember the slain 32 year-old Heather Heyer and 19 others who were injured.

Thomas Brown studies landmarks of Confederate memory such as the flag, shown here flying at the South Carolina capitol before it was taken down this summer.
eyeliam / Flickr Creative Commons

The Confederate flag has been around for more than a century, yet the controversial symbol has been in the headlines almost every week this year. South Carolina removed the flag from their state grounds this summer after the shooting of churchgoers in Charleston, but the debate over Confederate symbols has continued across the nation.

Historian Thomas Brown has studied landmarks of Confederate memory around the country and examines what they can teach us about Americans’ changing political, social, and economic positions.

The pick-up trucks and cars adorned with Confederate and American flags flapping in the air were hard to miss as they rolled down Franklin Street.

As the caravan came to a stop, one woman got out of her truck with a flag wrapped around her waist. Others sported rebel caps and Confederate t-shirts.

A Confederate monument
Daderot / Wikimedia Commons

The shooting of nine African-Americans earlier this month has prompted national debate over whether the Confederate battle flag should continue to fly at the South Carolina Capitol.

Gov. Nikki Haley called for the flag to be taken down while President Obama said it "represented more than just ancestral pride" during the eulogy of Rev. Clementa Pinckney Friday.

Unveiling of the confederate monument in 1913.
Wilson Library

On June 2nd, 1913, the University of North Carolina dedicated a memorial on its Chapel Hill campus to students who had fought for the Confederacy.  A century later, Silent Sam – as the statue has come to be known – still stirs passions.