Richard Nixon

Meet Robert Brown

Jan 18, 2016
Image of Robert Brown (second from right) meeting with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his assistant Bernard Lee and Rev. L.V. Booth.
Robert Brown

Note: This is a rebroadcast from last year. To hear a follow up to this interview with Robert Brown, click here

Robert Brown is one of the most influential North Carolinians you’ve never heard of.

President Richard Nixon greeting Robert and his late wife Sallie Brown in the White House
Robert Brown

In the 1960s, High Point resident Robert Brown worked closely with Martin Luther King Jr. as a fundraiser. Brown has also advised several prominent American politicians, including Senators John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, and Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan.

Meet Robert Brown

Aug 3, 2015
Image of Brown meeting with Nelson Mandela in South Africa at his home in Johannesburg.
Robert Brown

Robert Brown is one of the most influential North Carolinians you’ve never heard of.

He had a pretty humble start in High Point, where he was born and raised. He was among the city’s first African-American police officers in the 1950s.

But he moved on quickly, first as a federal drug enforcement officer, and then as an adviser to some of the world’s most powerful people: Martin Luther King Jr., Richard Nixon, Nelson Mandela and John F. Kennedy, and that’s only part of the list.

President Lyndon Johnson, President-elect Richard Nixon, Rev. Billy Graham and Vice President-elect Spiro Agnew during a prayer at swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Capitol January 20, 1969.
flickr.com/photos/washington_area_spark

Newly released excerpts from H.R. Haldeman’s diary provide new insights into the relationship between Billy Graham and Richard Nixon. 

Audio journals from Nixon’s chief of staff reveal Graham’s firm grasp of political craftsmanship, and Nixon’s reliance on the televangelist for more than spiritual advice.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Carolina Public Press reporter Jon Elliston about the audio journals and what they revealed. 

Richard Nixon, Time cover April 30, 1973, The Watergate Scandal
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nostri-imago/ / Time Magazine

A lawyer in North Carolina served as the Assistant Majority Counsel on the Watergate Committee. Eugene Boyce was a trial attorney in Raleigh.  He spoke to Frank Stasio on the State of Things to look back on the role he played on the historic investigation of President Richard Nixon. 

Rufus Edmisten is donating his papers to UNC-Chapel Hill. Edmisten worked for Senator Sam Ervin on the Senate Watergate Committee.

Dave DeWitt: The shining star of the collection Edmisten is donating is the subpoena he served to then-President Richard Nixon. In July 1973, Edmisten delivered the subpoena, after it became known that Nixon recorded conversations in the White House.

In an interview with the State of Things in 2006, Edmisten remembers Nixon's actions that eventually led to his resignation.