Race & Demographics

National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings,
Brynn Anderson / AP

It’s hard to count the exact number of African Americans who were lynched by white mobs during the years following slavery. Numbers show most of these brutal, deadly acts occurred in the South, between the 1870s and the 1950s.

Image of Asheville police car
Osajus / Flickr Creative Commons

 

Yesterday, the Asheville Citizen Times revealed the Asheville Police Department has been following local civil rights group since the shooting of Jai “Jerry” Williams two years ago.

By Image Editor (14EmmettTillBefore) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The federal government has reopened an investigation into the 1955 murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till based on information published in a Duke professor’s book.

Courtesy of the Independent Media Institute.

A national group has erected two billboards in Raleigh seeking the removal of a Confederate statue known as Silent Sam.

Cedar Fork Elementary in Wake County would have to add three more kindergarten classrooms under the class-size change scheduled to go into effect in the fall.
Jess Clark / WUNC

Aspiring teachers are more likely to mistake emotions for anger in the face of a black person than a white person, according to a new study published in the journal "Contemporary Education." It also found that participants were more likely to view the behavior of black boys as hostile.

The United States is becoming more diverse.
Vintage 2017 Population Estimates / Census

By 2025, projections show North Carolina will have 23 counties in which non-Hispanic whites are not the majority race, sometimes referred to as a majority minority population.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Public outrage shamed the Trump administration into agreeing not to separate families at the border. Now a federal judge has put an end to most family separations and is calling for the families to be reunified. Since May, an estimated 2300 children have been taken away from their parents while trying to enter the country.

Courtesy of Franco Ordoñez

In an attempt to regulate unaccompanied children who cross the border, the Trump administration is considering detaining them in tent cities. In an exclusive by Franco Ordoñez of McClatchy, there are reports that the Department of Health and Human Services is scouting locations at military bases in Texas that will house up to 5,000 migrant children.

Courtesy of Sara Wood / Southern Mix

The Asian-American population in North Carolina has exploded in the past few decades. A 2016 study shows that from 2000-2010, the Asian-American population in the state grew by 85 percent, which was the third-fastest growth rate in the country. But who exactly makes up this growing population? What are their stories and traditions, and how are they changing the face of North Carolina?

Warren County, Warrenton, Parks and Recreation, African Americans
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The season for cookouts, games and outdoor relaxation is in full swing at local parks across the state. It’s especially the right time for fun in the town of Warrenton, near the Virginia state line, which recently opened its first municipal park. It sits in an all-black community that has had few options for recreation over the years.

 D'wann Harvin-Bailey, right, Christopher Foust, middle, and Tahj Turner, left, help clear debris from a tornado-damaged site while working with the Black Suits Initiative in Greensboro, N.C. on Saturday, April 28, 2018.
Ben McKeown / for WUNC

When the white door to a three bedroom, one bathroom home on the south side of Greensboro opened recently, its frame filled with a tiny, older white woman before becoming engulfed by a 6-foot-4-inch black teenager.

Although the two don't look alike, Debbie Rochelle and Khalil Setzer are related.

Confederate Flag, Orange County, Silent Sam
Leoneda Inge

The Orange County Board of Commissioners say they can't do anything about messages on a raised flag waving on a flagpole on private property.

But, they can decide the size of the flag and the height of the flagpole.

The Silent Sam monument stands prominently on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s campus. Protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the monument on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

A law in North Carolina that was written to make moving Confederate monuments nearly impossible will soon get its first true test.

The North Carolina Historical Commission is expected to decide as soon as early June whether Gov. Roy Cooper may relocate three Confederate monuments from outside the State Capitol.

people marching with confederate flags in Washington, D.C.
Elvert Barnes / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/ye6c21

Residents of Orange County will get the chance to speak out on plans to clarify regulations on flags and flagpoles.

The debate centers around the flying of a mega-sized Confederate flag over Highway 70.

Juana Luz Tobar Ortega stands outside St. Barnabas’ Episcopal Church in Greensboro, where she is living in sanctuary.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Since Donald Trump took office, the number of non-criminal undocumented immigrants detained and arrested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has spiked. That has pushed some to seek sanctuary in churches, where ICE says its policy is to avoid enforcement in so-called “sensitive locations.”

This video shows a white police officer choking a young tuxedo-clad man who is African American, pushing him against a storefront and then slamming him to the ground outside a North Carolina Waffle House.
Anthony Wall via Facebook / Screenshot by NPR

Waffle House has become embroiled in a new public scandal, and African-American activists are calling for a boycott. Early this week, a video went viral of 22-year-old Anthony Wall getting choked by a police officer outside of a Waffle House in Warsaw, North Carolina.

Sarah Alsammak stood in front of a grafitti wall on North Carolina State University's campus
Maddy Gray / For WUNC

Sarah Alsammak walked across North Carolina State University's campus pointing out various landmarks. One of her favorite places is the tunnel where students draw graffiti art.

She stopped to pose for a photo – which took longer than it might have, if not for students darting between her and a photographer. She hasn't painted anything on the tunnel walls herself, but said she might before she graduates.

refugees and migrants in boat
Felipe Dana / Associated Press

The Trump administration’s new refugee restrictions have drastically cut the rate of refugees arriving in the United States and in North Carolina. In 2016, more than 3,000 refugees were resettled in the state. In 2017 there were fewer than 2,000 – the lowest rate in at least a decade. With the new stricter federal vetting policies in place, North Carolina is set to admit fewer than 900 refugees by the end of 2018.

book cover for 'murder on shades mountain,' picturing a dirt road
Duke University Press

In 1931, Willie Peterson was arrested for the attack of three white women in Birmingham, Alabama. He did not match the description that the sole survivor of the attack gave police, other than the fact that he was black. He was convicted and sentenced to death.

Sheriff Mike Andrews stands and speaks to a crowd of about 30 at a forum in Durham. Opponent Clarence Birkhead looks on from his seat.
James Morrison

A legal battle over the destruction of a Confederate monument in Downtown Durham is over, but the political fallout lingers.

Durham County Sheriff Mike Andrews pressed hard for felony charges against the original nine suspects last August. And now he’s facing a tough battle in the May 8 Democratic primary race against opponent Clarence Birkhead – the candidate he beat in the 2014 race. 

text of the sign: 'Freedom Hill: Community established here by freed blacks in 1865. Incorporated as Princeville in 1885.'
ncdcr.gov

The concept began with eight mayors from historically black towns who joined academics to preserve history, problem solve and build for the future. The 2015 project was so successful, it has expanded into the multidisciplinary Black Communities conference. Hosted by the Institute for African American Research and NCGrowth, organizer Karla Slocum is professor of Anthropology and the Director of the Institute of African American Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and organizer Mark Little is Director of NCGrowth and Executive Director at UNC Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise.

close up photo of people exchanging rings during a wedding ceremony
Pixabay/Creative Commons

There was a time during slavery when black women could not legally marry. Yet, throughout history the single black woman has been vilified.

Rev. Gil Caldwell (far right) with Martin Luther King, Jr.
truthinprogress.com

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and many people across the Tar Heel state are remembering the civil rights leader.

Slavery, Confederate Monuments, Duke University
Leoneda Inge

Universities from Brown in Rhode Island to Furman in South Carolina have commissions in place to study Race, Slavery and Monuments.  One institution where millions of dollars is being spent to make sure everyone has a say in how universities remember and mark the past is the University of Virginia.

Farmworkers, Unions, Student Action with Farmworkers, UNCTV
SAF and UNCTV

A documentary about the little-known woman who co-founded the first farmworkers unions is being shown tonight in Raleigh. Many people have heard of Cesar Chavez. But right next to him was Dolores Huerta, fighting for racial and labor justice. Here is activist Angela Davis from the documentary called “Dolores.”

photo of a group of people posing for a picture
Courtesy of SNCC Digital Gateway.

Duke University has teamed up with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Legacy Project to connect today’s young organizers with activists of the civil rights era. The project is called “SNCC Digital Gateway,” and its aim is to pass on informational wealth from the organizers of SNCC to the young people of today, to help inform their activism. Instead of solely taking information from the SNCC activists, researchers treated the activists as partners and fellow scholars in their collaboration on this project.

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

People from across North Carolina got the chance to speak out on the fate of the confederate monuments on the Raleigh state capitol grounds. A special committee is tasked with recommending if the statues should remain where they are, or be moved to a state historic site.

An analyisis by the Carolina Population Center finds that 49 percent of adults in North Carolina were born outside the state.
Carolina Population Center

Nearly half of all adults in North Carolina were born outside the state, according to an analysis by the Carolina Population Center.

NCCU, BCBSNC, Nursing, Rural Health
Courtesy of NCCU

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is handing out millions of dollars this year as part of its community health initiative. North Carolina Central University in Durham is one of the recipients.

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