Quail Ridge Books

photo of Steve Michell, Tom Campbell, Sarah Goddin, Linda-Marie Barrett and Erica Eisdorfer
Courtesy of Deonna Kelli Sayed/Jon Mayes/Lance Richardson

Summer is the time of year when vacationers look for good books to take to the beach or their backyard hammocks.

These books can be the ones that are light, frivolous and enjoyable, or simply the ones that you never had the chance to finish before.

Retelling The Story Of The Wilmington Ten

Jan 15, 2016
The Wilmington Ten held a press conference at Central Prison in Raleigh to denounce Governor Jim Hunt’s decision not to pardon them.
Steve Murray / News and Observer

Despite court-mandated integration in 1968,the relationship between black and white students grew more hostile in New Hanover County, North Carolina. 

In early 1971, a group of black students boycotted and demanded changes in the school system. They faced harassment and eventually violence from white supremacist groups. Law enforcement intervened after the interactions escalated into a fire and a death.

Learning To Cope With Extreme Narcissism

Nov 27, 2015
Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy for more than 30 years and has noticed an increase in narcissism in society.
Kathy Stanford

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

For more than 30 years, Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy. In that time, he noticed an increase in narcissism in society.

He sees it in the “selfies” people take or the idolization of celebrities with “me-first” attitudes.

Stock photo of a book
Horia Varlan / Flickr Creative Commons

When producer Sonja Williams began researching for the radio series, Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was, she found very little African-American radio drama from the 1940s. What little she found reinforced negative stereotypes.

A colleague eventually suggested she look into Destination Freedom, a series of weekly broadcasts created by journalist and activist Richard Durham that featured African-American leaders and heroes of the day.

Learning To Cope With Extreme Narcissism

Sep 23, 2015
Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy for more than 30 years and has noticed an increase in narcissism in society.
Kathy Stanford

For more than 30 years, Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy. In that time, he noticed an increase in narcissism in society.

He sees it in the “selfies” people take or the idolization of celebrities with “me-first” attitudes.

Narcissism exists on a spectrum from the benign qualities most people show from time to time to the diagnosable Narcissistic Personality Disorder, according to Burgo.

Ron Rash
www.wcu.edu

Ron Rash is a critically acclaimed novelist who has won many accolades for his five novels, including Serena and World Made Straight.

When Rash penned his most recent work, he began with a single image: dead trout in a stream. From there, he knew he wanted to craft a narrative about hope and he used the relationship between a sheriff and a park ranger to do just that.

Pediatric oncologist Dr. Raymond Barfield has always loved storytelling. As a child he would often sit and listen to his grandfather tell tales, and in college he sought out the work of philosophers who illustrated their ideas with specific stories.

Long Upon The Land

Aug 6, 2015
Image of Long Upon The Land cover
Grand Central Publishing

Margaret Maron has written mystery novels for more than two decades.

Her longest series is about a North Carolina district court judge named Deborah Knott. Maron’s latest title, “Long Upon The Land” (Grand Central Publishing/2015) is the 20th and final novel in the series.

Host Frank Stasio talks to Maron about the book and her writing career.

Gavel
www.stockmonkeys.com / Flickr Creative Commons

Joe and Lisa Stone are small-town attorneys in Virginia. The fine residents of Henry County know Stone and Stone as the firm that looks out for the little guy. 

But when an investigation into the apparent death of a paranoid, crackpot inventor reveals an invention that could be worth millions and a big pharmaceutical company that will stop at nothing to own it, things get a little murky for Stone and Stone. 

Image of Benjamin Hedin, who is a widely published author and essayist. His latest book is 'In Search of the Movement: The Struggle for Civil Rights Then and Now.'
Sheila Griffin

On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The law ended unfair voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools and workplaces.

Unfortunately, that law did not end discrimination, and people around the country continue to fight every day for equal rights and freedom. 

N.C. author Liza Wieland
East Carolina University

For North Carolina author Liza Wieland, three separate narratives converged to her new book, Land of Enchantment.

The novel traces the experiences of three multiracial women in three different parts of the country. The characters share common themes around love, loss, racial identity and art. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with writer and English professor at East Carolina University Liza Wieland.

David Joy's new book tells the story of a young man working for his father's meth ring in rural North Carolina.
David-Joy.com

Jacob McNeely grew up in the mountains of North Carolina.

A life of crime as an employee of his father's meth ring is the only one he has ever known. But a violent event and a reunion with his first love offer McNeely the possibility of escape. 

iUniverse, Lucy Daniels

  At 22 years old, Lucy Daniels was a best-selling author and a Guggenheim Award winner.  But she spent five years hospitalized for severe anorexia and the trauma of sudden success led Daniels to stop writing for much of her adult life.  After a 40 year gap, Lucy Daniels took up writing again.  Host Frank Stasio speaks with Daniels, a writer and clinical psychologist, about her newest book, “Walking with Moonshine: My Life in Stories” (iUniverse/ 2013).

Cover of Lionel Shriver's new book, 'Big Brother.'
http://www.npr.org/assets/bakertaylor/covers/manually-added/big-brother_custom.jpg

In her new book, "Big Brother," Lionel Shriver takes on the struggle of obesity through Edison. He is a formerly good looking, charismatic jazz musician who has become hugely obese and down on his luck. His sister takes him on as a project, threatening her marriage and her sanity.

Writer Christopher Tilghman is known to some as the bard of the borderlands. His short stories and novels, including the much acclaimed “Mason's Retreat," are set on the eastern shore of Maryland. It's a place where water and land meet, where slavery existed north of the Mason-Dixon Line and most of life is a calculation rather than a dream or a conviction.