A picture of lights on a police car.
Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr Creative Commons

Police and community leaders in Fayetteville are working on a local incarnation of the Silent Siren program to help veterans in an emergency.

Fayetteville police responded last week to a call from a woman whose husband, a soldier, was parked outside a Walmart threatening to kill himself. Police approached the stand off without lights, sirens and shouting.  They were able get the soldier help.

Fayetteville wants to expand that gentle approach for emergencies involving veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or traumatic brain injury.

The state's NAACP along with other civil rights groups held a press conference Thursday afternoon outside East Wake High School.
Reema Khrais

A group of parents, students and civil rights organizations filed a federal lawsuit against the Wake County School system and local police departments, alleging that the school system’s policing practices “violate the constitutional rights of students.”

The complaint claims that the police officers who work in Wake County schools unlawfully punish students and criminalize exceedingly minor misbehaviors such as “throwing water balloons, stealing paper from a recycling bin and play-fighting with a friend.” 

Police Training

In the early morning hours of November 19, Durham  youth Jesus Huerta left home. His family called 911, reported him as a troubled runaway and noted his drug problem. A Durham police officer located Huerta, frisked him, cuffed him, and put him in the back of a cruiser. Moments later, the 17 year-old was dead from a gunshot to the head. His family questions the circumstances surrounding his death.

Friends and relatives posted pictures like these of Jesus Huerta around Durham, NC
Leoneda Inge


Jesus Huerta died from a gunshot wound while in police custody last November. Did officers know he was at risk of killing himself? The teen's family says yes.

Durham authorities have said the officer on the scene, Samuel Duncan, had not been told the 17-year-old threatened to kill himself and used drugs before the officer picked him up the morning of Nov. 19.

But the attorney representing Huerta’s family questions that and points to this radio communication in which officers talk about Huerta having a history of drug abuse:

Durham Police Department badge.
City of Durham


Seventeen year-old Jesus Huerta died of a gunshot wound in the back of a Durham police car last month. His death sparked protests outside of Durham Police Department Headquarters.

A teenager died in a Durham police car in the department’s headquarters parking lot early Tuesday after the officer driving him heard "a loud noise" in the car, authorities said. 

Police stand outside the capitol during a Moral Mondays protest.
Matthew Lenard

General Assembly Police Chief Jeff Weaver testified recently that law enforcement officers collected intelligence on participants in Moral Monday protests. Police officials say the measures were necessary to ensure public safety. Critics say the move went too far.

An older model Raleigh police car. The department is installing propane tanks in some of its cars.
Alberto Rodriguez via Creative Commons

The Raleigh Police Department is adding propane tanks to more of its patrol cars after a two-year test run. 

Bubba the ram has been spotted several times in Durham in the past week. He's still on the run.
Steve Sbraccia, WNCN News

There’s a ram on the loose in Durham County whose escape tactics have outsmarted capture attempts by the Durham County Sheriff’s Office, a man with a tranquilizer gun and a local veterinarian with a lasso. The animal was first spotted near Odyssey Drive in Durham on Monday afternoon, August 25, and is thought to be a either a Barbados/Mouflon sheep or a Toggenburg goat. Deputy Paul Sherwin with the Durham County Sheriff’s Office was one of the officers who responded to Monday's call.

A woman is arrested at the state capitol as a part of a Moral Mondays protest.

The cost of policing Moral Mondays is growing, and some aren't happy about who is picking up the bill.  Usually, protests on state property are handled by the State Capitol Police and the General Assembly Police.  But since a 2011 budget cut, state capitol police have been down 40 staff members—almost half the force.

State Police Chief Glenn Allen says the cut limits what his force can do.

Cassandra Deck-Brown

City Manager J. Russell Allen announced today that he has named Cassandra Deck-Brown to be Raleigh’s new Chief of Police. Deck-Brown has been serving as Interim Police Chief for the Raleigh Police Department since October 1, 2012, when former Police Chief Harry Dolan retired. Prior to being Interim Police Chief, she was the Deputy Chief. Deck-Brown is the first African-American female to hold the position. Her promotion is effective February 1.

A new chief has been hired for the Fayetteville Police Department.

Harold Medlock accepted the job as top cop in Fayetteville today. He appeared at a news conference with his wife to be formally introduced as chief. Medlock comes to Fayetteville from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department where he served as deputy chief. He says he won't begin his new duties until mid-February.

Greensboro Police will share recent accomplishments and listen to residents when a second round of community forums begins tonight.

Jeff Tiberii: Police Chief Ken Miller started these events last year with the hope of highlighting some of his department's initiatives while building better communication with local citizens. The Police Department says between 25 and 50 residents turned out to the first wave of forums. Captain Brian Cheek:

Representatives for some Raleigh police officers have filed a grievance against a new department evaluation policy.

Gurnal Scott: Trey Walters is a Raleigh officer of three-and-a-half years. He speaks for the 100 or so officers who say a system installed by Chief Harry Dolan evaluating officers' by quantity of work diminishes what they do.

Trey Walters: Chief Dolan is taking us down a path that will have police officers chasing numbers instead of criminals.

A new non-profit group will support Greensboro law enforcement.

City of Fayetteville Police Department

Fayetteville's City Council has taken steps to address a perception of racial bias in its police force. Civil rights groups have complained about a greater frequency of police searches on black residents than white ones. The Council voted Monday night to require at least one documented reason for asking for a consent search. Drivers and occupants still will have the right to refuse. City Manager Dale Iman says it's still up to each officer to determine what's a reasonable pretext to ask to search someone. But Iman says they have to document that reason now.

Police in Rocky Mount are using acoustic sensors to detect the sound of gunshots and find the location of the shooter. Sergeant Kevin Bern says the system called "ShotSpotter" uses four sensors strategically placed throughout the city.

Durham Police Department vehicle
Durham Police Department

The Durham Police have a new reminder for residents about the dangers of driving drunk. It looks like a police car in the front and a taxi cab in the back. The car tells drunk drivers they can choose their ride- either a taxi or a police car. Decals on the hood give information warning about the monetary cost of getting a DUI. Durham County Assistant Chief Lee Russ says the 'franken-car' will be parked outside of nightlife spots. He hopes that people will think twice before getting behind the wheel after drinking.

Campus Cops In Limbo

Dec 20, 2010

Every year, hundreds of arrests are made by police officers on private college campuses. The offenses range from public intoxication to drunk driving to sexual assault.  The officers making the arrests are fully licensed by the state; they carry firearms; and they are specially trained to work in a community made up mostly of 18 to 22 year olds.  But a case making its way through the North Carolina court system challenges their authority - and offers a different twist on the old arguments about the separation of church and state.