Photography

The Hillandale Elementary School chorus performs under the Lucky Strike Tower at the 12th annual lighting holiday event on Dec. 12, 2016.
Carter Chambliss / WUNC

Hundreds of people gathered at the American Tobacco campus in downtown Durham on Friday night for the annual tower lighting celebration.

a 196-foot-long lit Chinese Dragon
Ryan Wilusz / WUNC

The Cary Booth Amphitheatre has been transformed into a mesmerizing and bright setting with more than 20 displays as part of the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival.

Image of Dyanna Taylor and Dorothea Lange
Paul Taylor

Dorothea Lange is best known for her portraiture photography documenting America’s Great Depression. Her image “Migrant Mother” depicts a destitute woman with three children in California. It is one of the most recognized photographic portrayals of that era. When Lange passed away in 1965, her granddaughter, Dyanna Taylor, inherited one of her cameras and began to follow in her footsteps.

 

PHOTOS: Comicon Fans Descend On Downtown Durham

Nov 13, 2016
Sarah Harrod of Illustrations and Creations by Sarah Harrod sold her products on Saturday at ComicCon.
Sarah Muzzillo / WUNC

Fans of comics, superheroes and cosplay gathered in downtown Durham this weekend for the annual NC Comicon event.

PHOTOS: Duke Upsets UNC In Long-Running Rivalry

Nov 11, 2016
Mikey Bart and Marlon Dunlap of UNC tackle Shaun Wilson to end Duke’s drive down the field.
Hannah Smith / WUNC

The Duke Blue Devils upset the North Carolina Tar Heels 28 to 27 in the rival game Thursday night.

Duke's Daniel Jones ran for two scores and threw for another to help Duke upset No. 15 North Carolina.

The redshirt freshman gave the defense fits all night with his mobility for the Blue Devils, running for 94 yards as part of a ground game that kept moving the chains against the Tar Heels.

PHOTOS: McCrory, Cooper Supporters Wait For Results In Governor's Race

Nov 8, 2016
Roy Cooper
Brian Batista / WUNC

North Carolina Republican Gov. Pat McCrory remains locked in a tight race with his Democratic challenger Roy Cooper. McCrory told supporters that the election isn't over and that they need to respect the electoral system.

An image 'Black Righteous Space' by Hank Willis Thomas
Hank WIllis Thomas

For Hank Willis Thomas, a good photograph is an image that sticks with somebody long after they first see it. As a photographer and conceptual artist, Thomas uses images to critique cultural perceptions about race, gender and class. 

A new exhibit at The Carrack Modern Art Museum in Durham features works from three generations of the Belans family. It includes photography by the late Herbert A. Belans reinterpreted and repurposed by his granddaughter, photographer and artist Leah Sobsey.  Linda Belans, Leah’s mother and Herbert’s daughter, links the works with her poetry. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Leah Sobsey and Linda Belans about how an inheritance of old film negatives turned into a multi-generational family art collaboration.

PHOTOS: A Day Of Mural Painting In Durham

Oct 24, 2016
a woman paints a mural in Durham
Nicholas Byrne / WUNC

This past weekend, a collection of local artists gathered to paint graffiti and murals outside the Duke Arts Annex.

The event, know as Mural Durham, brought together local Durham artists and the Durham community for a day of mural painting, local food, music and fun.

wuncphotos: Share your North Carolina photos with WUNC on Instagram

An image from Bright's series '#1960Now' that explores the parallels between the Civil Rights Movement and the current  #BlackLivesMatter movement today.
Sheila Pree Bright

Photographer Sheila Pree Bright first picked up a camera in search of a means of personal expression. After her first public exhibit, it was clear that not only did she have a gift for making beautiful images, but her work also sparked thoughtful and unexpected conversations about race, politics, and justice. Bright first came into the national spotlight with the series “Suburbia,” which explored black suburban life in Atlanta.

PHOTOS: Opening Night At The NC State Fair

Oct 14, 2016
A family poses for a picture at the entrance on the opening night of the NC State Fair in Raleigh on Thursday, October 13, 2016.
Brianna Ladd / WUNC

From the midway and horticulture exhibits, to new rides and food, the North Carolina State Fair kicked off this week with usual fanfare.

The 11-day celebration includes old favorites, as well as the premiere of its first permanent ride this year: the State Fair Flyer, a ski lift-like ride that transports fairgoers across the midway and offers an aerial view of the grounds.

Courtesy of Zanele Muholi

In 2006, South Africa became the fifth country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage. While social justice activists around the world saw this event as a tremendous victory, the country was still in a lot of turmoil. Homophobic hate crimes and violence were on the rise, and many individuals reported being subject to “curative rape,” a hate crime in which someone is raped to “cure” them of their sexual identity.

World of Bluegrass festival performers
Evan Millican / WUNC

The World of Bluegrass held its annual StreetFest in downtown Raleigh last week.

The event included hundreds of offerings for bluegrass professionals and music aficionados -- and plenty of banjos and fiddles.

Several different people from inside and outside N.C. State campus came to see the corpse flower blossom over the weekend of September 24, 2016.
Brian Batista / WUNC

The rare titan arum, also known as the corpse flower, began to bloom on Thursday, December 22 at a greenhouse at NC State University in Raleigh.

The tropical plant produces a big flower – one of the largest in the plant kingdom – and also a big stink often described as the smell of rotting flesh.

Participants in the 2016 Dragon Boat Race in Cary, NC
Lexie Ma Xiaochi / WUNC

The Koka Booth Amphitheatre in Cary was the site of the third annual Triangle Area Dragon Boat Festival on Saturday September 17, 2016.

The event was organized by Asian Focus, an area nonprofit that supports programs to help Asian American and immigrants of all generations. 

Photo of Mamie Neugent
David Spear

​In the late 1980s and early 90s, North Carolina photographer David Spear spent several years documenting the lives of his neighbors, the Neugents.

The family owned a tobacco farm in Rockingham County, and his photos depicted their attempts to keep their tobacco farm alive at a time when many others were dying. He described the Neugents as "fabulous people" who "raise hell, and they don't try to hide it."

An image of Negar Mottahedeh
Golbarg Bashi

It's easy to think of a "selfie" as a narcissistic way to accrue "likes" on social media and  flaunt your latest traveling adventures. But every "selfie" tells a story about the photographer's world.

Negar Mottahedeh, associate professor of literature at Duke University in Durham, says taking a selfie is a humanizing way to document history in the age of social media. In a recent speech at TEDxDurham, Mottahedeh illustrated the ways selfies can be used as tools for protest and citizen journalism.

The head of the 4th of July Parade in Monroe, NC. It’s unclear the year of the photo.
Frank Marchant / Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina

Happy 240th birthday, U.S.A.

Known as the Fourth of July or Independence Day, today marks the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, 1776 by the Continental Congress declaring that the 13 American colonies were free as a sovereign nation.

photo of "Woodstock" by Burk Uzzle
Burk Uzzle

Burk Uzzle remembers taking pictures at the bus station when he was just a teenager living in eastern North Carolina. In high school, he worked part-time as a photographer for the News & Observer and eventually became the youngest photographer hired by LIFE magazine. Throughout the years, Uzzle captured iconic images of Martin Luther King Jr. and Woodstock, and his archive now spans six decades and prominently features images of his Southern roots.

Image of United States map in Lower Ninth Ward by John Rosenthal.
John Rosenthal

When photographer John Rosenthal vacationed to New Orleans in 2007, he was stunned by the condition of the Lower Ninth Ward. Contrary to the images that he had seen on television and in newspapers, he found the community to be one not in chaos but at a standstill.

Photographer Nadia Sablin spent seven summers documenting the lives of her aunts Alevtina and Ludmila in a small village in northwest Russia. These photographs are some of those shown in her new book 'Aunties: The Seven Summers of Alevtina and Ludmila.'
Nadia Sablin

Photographer Nadia Sablin grew up in St. Petersburg, Russia, and each summer her family escaped the hustle and bustle of the city to spend time with their extended family in a small, rural village. They left Russia for good in 1992 and Sablin didn’t know whether she would ever get a chance to go back.

She went back for the first time more than 15 years later, and although everything in Russia had changed, one little piece of the world remained exactly the same: the small family home in Alekhovshchina.

Army recruits arriving at Fort Benning for basic training
Raymond McCrea Jones

What makes someone want to become a soldier? What does it look like to transition from a civilian to a soldier? How does it affect individuality?

Raymond McCrea Jones, who used to be on staff at the New York Times, wanted to answer those questions. He embedded himself in a company of 162 Army recruits at Fort Benning in Georgia for 10 weeks. His fly-on-the-wall photos show the experience of basic training, from 4 a.m. wakeup calls to grueling field exercises.

Leah Sobsey scanned birds from the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences collections. Pictured are indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea) birds.
Leah Sobsey

From scanning dead birds to the photo that got away, the Click! Triangle Photography Festival gives a snapshot of the local photography scene.

It includes more than 60 events at more than 30 venues throughout October.

Image of Chapman in Shanghai with Professor Meihua Zhu, on the left, a former visiting scholar at UNC.
Mimi Chapman

The power of art is not lost on Mimi Chapman. She is a professor at the UNC School of Social Work who believes that art can have a profound impact on people’s ability to empathize. She also studies how art can help illuminate conscious and unconscious biases and affect how people treat one another.

Image of Eric Pickersgill's art installation
Eric Pickersgill

For some artists, making art is about creating something distinct from everything else that came before it. But in a new exhibit on view at The Ackland Art Museum, 11 artists explore the flip side of that artistic impulse. Their work raises questions about the value of creating new objects and explores the ethical and environmental implications of this work.

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