One-Man Play

Rob Jansen stars in the one-man play, 'The Tramp's New World,' which envisions a post-apocalytic world for Charlie Chaplin's character, 'Tramp.'
Manbites Dog Theater

Charlie Chaplin’s most well-known on-screen character was the “Tramp,” a bumbling man whose humor and playfulness guided audiences through some of the darkest periods of the early 20th century. After the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, renowned journalist and film critic James Agee urged Chaplin to bring back the Tramp. He wrote a screenplay and sent it to Chaplin, insisting that the Tramp’s humor and grace were essential to help the world heal from this tragedy. Chaplin declined, and the play faded mostly into oblivion.

Trieu Tran in 'Uncle Ho to Uncle Sam,' performed Sept. 17-Oct 6, 2013 at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Los Angeles.
Craig Schwartz

Trieu Tran has overcome immense challenges in his life as a refugee from the Vietnam War. His journey to America was sustained on the hope and promise of freedom. But when he arrived, his life was not nearly as glamorous.

Meanwhile, Tran struggled to understand his identity as a refugee in America. He took up acting, eventually landing roles in movies like “Tropic Thunder” and the award-winning TV series “The Newsroom.”

Image of actor Alphonse NIcholson playing the character Abel Green in Frieght.
Nick Graetz

  

A new one-man show by playwright Howard Craft tells the story of a man who exists in five incarnations at different points in American history. 

Image of writer and performer Aaron Davidman.
Ken Friedman

Aaron Davidman grew up on the West Coast in a progressive Jewish family, with a specific understanding of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

Image of Roger Guenveur Smith in his solo show, "Rodney King"
Patti McGuire

Rodney King gained overnight notoriety when videos surfaced of him being violently beaten by Los Angeles police officers.