New Orleans

Image of Pat Mother Blues Cohen
Courtesy of Pat Cohen

Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen started singing blues tunes as a young girl to entertain her parents’ friends at their home in Edison, New Jersey. She later worked for years in the casino industry and won casino talent competitions so often that she was banned from participating. 

Image of Second Line Stompers
Gregg Gelb

Note: this program is a rebroadcast. 

'Loves in need of love today' in Stefanie Jackon's 'Orpheus Soul Brothers' series
Stefanie Jackson

Artist Stefanie Jackson thinks of her drawings as works of fiction; they express emotions and evoke memories, but they focus on telling stories instead of documenting factual events.

Much of Jackson's work stems from important historical moments in African-American history that directly touched her own life, like the economic decline of Detroit, Michigan, or the devastation of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

Image of United States map in Lower Ninth Ward by John Rosenthal.
John Rosenthal

When photographer John Rosenthal vacationed to New Orleans in 2007, he was stunned by the condition of the Lower Ninth Ward. Contrary to the images that he had seen on television and in newspapers, he found the community to be one not in chaos but at a standstill.

The largest mass murder of gay individuals in America occurred at The Upstairs Lounge in New Orleans when 32 people were killed in a fire. Robert Camina's documentary 'Upstairs Inferno' looks back at it.
Robert Camina

Four years after the Stonewall riots, someone deliberately set fire to The Upstairs Lounge, a gay bar in New Orleans’ French Quarter.

Thirty-two people were killed, and many more were injured. It was the largest killing of gay individuals in American history, but to this day, little remains known about the tragedy. The new documentary “Upstairs Inferno” traces the story of the fire and documents the effect it had on survivors and the community.

Louis Armstrong Master of Modernism Yellow background behind black and white portrait of Louis Armstrong with trumpet
http://books.wwnorton.com/ / W.W. Norton and Company

    

Louis Armstrong is a integral figure in American popular music. And although many know him for his 1960s hits like "Hello Dolly" and "What a Wonderful World," his career in the 1920s and 30s really set a precedent for jazz vocals and instrumentals for future generations. 

The Bulltown Strutters bring the street band traditions of New Orleans to their own home in Durham, NC. The 20-member group urges their audiences to join them in parade, dance, and merry-making.

Church of Living God2,  2007 photograph by John Rosenthal
John Rosenthal

John Rosenthal is renowned for his black and white photographs of New York City in the 1970s. The photos archived parts of the city that were vanishing and eventually disappeared: a dusty model of a ship in a bottle in the window of a social club in Little Italy, for example, or seltzer bottles stacked in wood crates.