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Sunday's episode on February 22, 2015, of On The Media focused largely on issues surrounding the Chapel Hill shootings that left three young Muslims dead.

The show examined the divisive language of terrorism, reporting on media coverage and charges of double standards in that coverage, and at responses on social media.

You can listen to the whole program and selected excerpts below.

Malcolm X waiting for a press conference to begin on March 26, 1964.
U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress / Wikimedia Commons

The messages of civil rights leader Malcolm X still resonate 50 years after his assassination.

Conversations about Islam in America, police shootings and freedom of the press are as relevant in 2015 as they were on the day of his death: February 21, 1965.

Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill start a two-day conference to examine the legacy of Malcolm X today.

Yusor Abu-Salha was killed Tuesday night, along with her husband Deah Barakat and her sister Razan Abu-Salha.

Thousands of people gathered on the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill campus last night to remember three students who were shot to death on Tuesday: Yusor Abu-Salha, Razan Abu-Salha and Deah Barakat.

Last year, Yusor came to the StoryCorps booth in Durham with her former elementary school teacher Mussarut Jabeen.  Jabeen is principal of Al-Iman School in Raleigh.  During the StoryCorps interview, the two women discussed their lives, hopes and dreams for the future.

Reactions To Chapel Hill Shooting

Feb 11, 2015
Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha and Razan Abu-Salha were shot and killed in a Chapel Hill apartment complex.
deah.barakat /


Three students were killed near the University of North Carolina campus in Chapel Hill last night. A neighbor has been arrested and is being held in the Durham County Jail. 

Diya Abdo headshot


Growing up as a Palestinian in Jordan, Diya Abdo straddled multiple cultures. Her love of American literature brought her to the United States. 

The Muslims Are Coming! / A film by Negin Farsad and Dean Obeidallah

Since 9/11, some news accounts portray Muslim-Americans only as terrorist threats. These stories create stereotypes in the minds of the American public. A new film, The Muslims Are Coming, co-directed by Negin Farsad and Dean Obeidallah, follows a group of Muslim-American comedians on a tour across America.