Movies On The Radio

Credit Keith Weston / WUNC

"Movies on the Radio" is a series of  conversations about the silver screen from The State of Things. Listeners provide feedback about their favorites and least favorites. Then, Frank Stasio and guests take an in-depth look at what moves us at the movies.  

Joe Wolf / Flickr Creative Commons

Dystopian films take viewers to cities in the sky and barren, post-apocalyptic landscapes. They explore futuristic universes while also tapping into the darker side of the human condition. 

In this episode of "Movies on the Radio," listeners discuss their favorite dystopian films. Host Frank Stasio talks with experts Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about how dystopian art emerges from societal reaction to politics and government.

Laura Boyes will host a screening of the 1930 Film "King of Jazz" at Friday, April 21 at 8 p.m. at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. 

And on May 5, you can catch Marsha Gordon at a special screening of The Big Red One at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh. 

Rosenfeld Media / Flickr

Flying cars, totalitarian regimes, and post-apocalyptic worlds. These are just a few characteristics of the dystopian film genre--movies that explore a twisted view of the future.

A promotional still with John Wayne and Claire Trevor from the 1939 American Western film 'Stagecoach'.
Wikimedia Commons

A gun-slinging cowboy on a mission of revenge takes down the enemy in a quick-draw duel.  He then rides off on his trusted steed with the setting sun casting long shadows on the rugged landscape. This is one of the iconic narratives in Western film, a genre which has gone through a massive evolution since its “good versus evil” and “cowboys versus Indians” days.

Actor John Wayne aims his gun in the 1956 Western film 'The Searchers' by John Ford.
Wikimedia Commons

From gunslingers to saloons, for the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what are your picks for the best Western films of all time? Are you a fan of John Wayne classics like “Stagecoach,” Western satires like “Blazing Saddles, or genre-bending releases like “Django Unchained”?

An image of acrots Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in the film 'La La Land'
Summit Entertainment

Whether it was action blockbusters like “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” or sci-fi thrillers like “Arrival,” Hollywood offered a dynamic mix for audiences in 2016.
 

For this month’s Movies on the Radio, listeners picked their favorite films from the past year, including critically-acclaimed movies like “La La Land” and “Moonlight." 

stu_wp FLICKR Creative Commons

It’s our year end wrap up for Movies on the Radio and we want to know, what was your favorite movie of 2016?  Amid all the summer blockbusters and family films, did anything stand out? We've already got a submission for "The Witch," what's your favorite? Send an email to sot@wunc.org or tweet #sotmovie. Hurry! The holidays have shortened the deadline on this one. We need your submissions by December 15th.

 

Movies on the Radio
WUNC

From sappy to silly to downright vile, Hollywood has tried for generations to capture the many facets of the American family. Just in time for Thanksgiving, and for this month’s Movies on the Radio program, we asked our listeners for their favorite movies about families. In their choices, listeners often saw a version of their own family struggles splashed across the silver screen.

Jonathan Tommy

Is your family more Focker or Corleone? For the next Movies on the Radio, The State of Things is asking, “What’s your favorite movie about families?” Whether functional or dysfunctional, biological, adopted or chosen...heartwarming, funny or dark… we want to know which films capture what family means to you. Send an email to sot@wunc.org or tweet #sotmovie. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Whether it is a scathing satire or a chilling suspense film, plotlines about politics and the political process make for great drama. For this month’s edition of Movies on the Radio, listeners draw parallels between their favorite political movies and the current election season.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what is your favorite movie about politics? 

Do you like the classics, such as “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” or "The Manchurian Candidate?"  Did you enjoy Julianne Moore’s performance as Sarah Palin in “Game Change” or were you charmed by Kevin Kline in the rom-com "Dave?"   Film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes will examine how movies depict politicians and government and discuss memorable scenes from political movies through the ages.

Photo of Prince from "Purple Rain"
Sound Opinions / Flickr

Music can transport people to a particular time and place in a way that not many other things can. And for that reason, it has become an essential element of film.

Sometimes music is used as a tool to underscore a particular emotion or theme, and in other instances it is so distinct and memorable that it becomes a character of its own.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what is your favorite movie about music? 

Did you enjoy the humorous depiction of rock stars in "Almost Famous?" Were you moved by the dramatic portrait of Mozart in "Amadeus?" Do you still remember the soundtracks of "American Graffiti" and "Jaws?" Film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes will examine how movies depict musicians and the music industry and discuss memorable movie music.

Screenshot from Zootopia
BagoGames / Flickr

From Jungle Book to Jaws and Babe to The Lion King, the stars of the silver screen are often not humans but instead are our four-legged friends. Though no animal has ever won an Oscar, viewers have embraced animal actors and characters in film.

Lion King
Jared via Flickr

From Jungle Book to Jaws and Babe to Lion King, the stars of the silver screen are often not humans but instead are our four-legged friends. For the Movies on the Radio on The State of Things, tell us your favorite animal film. Email us here with "Movies" in the subject line. 

photo from "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Moni3 [Public Domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Most movies are sources of adventure and excitement, but some films can also be a source of temptation. Whether a movie was off-limits by your parents or banned by the church, a forbidden film can often be all the more enticing to watch. Maybe your parents thought the dinosaur eating a man off the toilet in "Jurassic Park" was too violent, or that "To Kill a Mockingbird" talked about taboo topics.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next installment of Movies on the Radio, The State of Things is asking, what is your 'forbidden film'? This could be a movie you weren't allowed to watch growing up, or a movie you don't want your children to see. 

Did you sneak into the theater as a kid to watch "Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom"? Or, as a parent, did you hide "Bambi" from your kids because of it's traumatic violence? 

Craig Duffy / Flickr

From "The Godfather" series to "Pulp Fiction," some of the greatest films of all time are about crimes and the people who commit them.

Movie lovers are drawn to fascinating characters like Scarface and Hannibal Lecter. Hollywood has driven good people to love bad characters for generations.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about listeners' favorite crime films in the next edition of "Movies on the Radio."

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what is your favorite crime movie?

From classic crime dramas like "A Few Good Men" to law thrillers like "The Firm," film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes will break down the elements that make the best movies about crime and punishment.

Do you have an affinity for Miami drug lord Tony Montana in "Scarface"? Or do you prefer LA gangsters Vincent Vega and Jules Winnfield of "Pulp Fiction"?

Image of two best friends
Flickr/ Stuart Seeger

Best friends are the constant in many people's lives. They rescue each other when a car breaks down. They join go on late-night quests for fast food. And they console and support each other in a time of need. The relationships of best friends have been fodder for movie plot lines for decades and exist in all genres.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Best friends are there for one another during hard times. They join each other on adventures and are often the first people to offer up advice or a reality-check when it’s needed.

Movies about these friendships have been around for decades and range from lighthearted films like Dumb & Dumber that trace best friends' misadventures to more tender explorations of how friendships withstand life’s up and downs, like Beaches.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

From Citizen Kane to All The President's Men, the world of journalism has provided subject matter for the silver screen for decades.

Some plot lines resonate with viewers for their basis in real-life facts.  Others are popular for their dramatization of the newsroom or television studio.

The State of Things wants to hear from you. What is your favorite journalism-related movie and why? Did Spotlight deserve the Oscar for Best Picture? Is All The President's Men the gold standard? Is Anchorman one of the all-time greats?

An image of Socars statues
Prayltno / Flickr Creative Commons

The Academy Awards are a time to celebrate the year's best in film, from the best in directing to costume design. But as movie stars like Leonardo DiCaprio and Cate Blanchett cross their fingers for a golden statue this year, many movies from 2015 remain overlooked by the Academy.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

The Oscars are coming up on February 28. Leading the nominees this year is The Revenant starring Leonardo DiCaprio in a riveting performance as a fur trapper in the 1820s. Meanwhile, Cate Blanchett received her seventh nomination for her role in Carol.

And some  actors and movie-goers alike claim this year's Academy Awards nominations lack diversity with no actors of color receiving nominations. 

This month's edition of 'Movies on the Radio' looks at movies about food or movies with food scenes.
Eric McGregor / Flickr Creative Commons

Chefs are fond of saying "we eat with our eyes," but that phrase takes on a whole new meaning when it comes to movies about food.

Films like the classic "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" or Stanley Tucci's "Big Night" have had stomachs rumbling for decades. But more recent movies like the animated "Ratatouille" or Jon Favreau's "Chef" have also been material for aspiring chefs and foodies. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next "Movies on the Radio" show, The State of Things wants to know about your favorite movie in which food is one of the leading characters.

From Stanley Tucci's "Big Night" to the animated "Ratatouille" or the classic "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," these are movies that make your stomach rumble.

Send an email to sot@wunc.org with your favorite food movie, and you could be a part of our next Movies on the Radio program.

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