Minorities

The UNC-system saw its highest enrollment ever last fall, and data show minorities are driving the system's growth.

10-year-old Tiylar Friday
Reema Khrais / WUNC

Tiylar Friday is a long-time reader.

"Ever since I was, I think, five," he says.

Today, he's 10. And he's got a lot of books.

"Sometimes I wouldn't like to read a book, but after I get in the middle of it, I just want to keep going cause I’m curious about what would happen next."

When Tiylar was in the third grade at his school in Greensboro, he and his peers were tested for gifted classes.

HealthServe is closing in Greensboro this week and 20,000 people will have to find a medical provider elsewhere.
Flickr.com

Health outcomes are tied to income and education, according to many studies, but little work has been done to examine the connections between long-term wealth and levels of well-being. 

Researchers will explore that idea and other ways economic mobility relates to health in minority populations on Friday at UNC-Chapel Hill's annual Minority Health Conference. 

duke.edu

In the fall of 1963, five undergraduate black students walked onto the campus at Duke University, integrating one of the last remaining segregated schools in the South. Their experience -- and that of the African-American students who followed -- was challenging as they overcame overt racism, biased faculty and social isolation.

Minority communities have always been aware of the problem of racial profiling, but by the late 1990s, it was at the forefront of public consciousness. By 1999, the New York Times was writing an average of three articles on racial profiling a week. The state of North Carolina took note, passing a law requiring police officers to fill out a form including information on the motorist's race at each traffic stop. More than ten years and 13 million traffic stops later, experts have analyzed the data.