The State of Things
12:10 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Governor Vetoes And Signs Controversial Laws

Governor Pat McCrory
Credit Governor's Office

The General Assembly recently finished up their lawmaking session, passing a variety of legislation, some of which has stirred quite a bit of controversy locally and nationally. All that’s left now is for Governor Pat McCrory to sign those laws of which he approves and veto those he’s against. He’s done both this week.

He signed into law a controversial Voter ID law that forces voters to show ID at the polling place, as well as shortens the hours of early voting and eliminates straight-ticket voting.

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The State of Things
12:08 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Exploring The Life, Legacy And Unfinished Work Of Julius L. Chambers

Julius Chambers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Credit Citizenplastic /

In 1948, William Chambers, a black maintenance worker in Montgomery County, NC was denied payment for a job by a white customer. William Chambers spent many afternoons searching for an attorney to represent him, but all the white lawyers he asked refused. William told this story to his son, Julius Chambers, who then vowed to become a lawyer and fight for justice.

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The State of Things
12:04 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Julius Chambers: A Remembrance And Legacy Of A Civil Rights Icon

Julius Chambers
Credit Ferguson, Chambers and Sumter


Julius Chambers has been a fixture on North Carolina’s legal scene for decades, helping lead the battle for civil rights and playing an instrumental role in the desegregation of Charlotte/Mecklenburg schools.

He died last Friday at 76.

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The State of Things
11:14 am
Wed July 3, 2013

DOMA And Voting Rights Act Decisions’ Impact On North Carolina

The United States Supreme Court
Credit Jeff Kubina

Two landmark decisions handed down by the United States Supreme Court last week could have serious implications for North Carolina. Justices struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, leaving southern states free to pursue changes to election law without prior federal approval. The court also struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act, saying that same-sex couples are entitled to the same benefits as heterosexual couples.

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