Journalism

Photo of Yasmin Evans and her mother
Yasmin Evans

As a young Muslim-American journalist, Yasmin Bendaas pays particular attention to how Muslim women are represented in the media.

As international media coverage continues to put a spotlight on the Islamic State Group and American political rhetoric highlights religious stereotypes, Bendaas began to wonder how these representations of Islam have impacted the daily lives of Muslim-American women.

Wikipedia Commons/ Hkeely

 In an era where many consumers get their news from Twitter feeds and Facebook posts, how do complex stories of corruption, crime and power get told? And what are the challenges facing today’s shrinking cohort of investigative reporters? 

Veteran journalist Chuck Lewis says investigative journalism has declined over the years as newsrooms shrink and costs of longer, in-depth reporting grow.
Roger H. Goun / Flickr Creative Commons

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

Chuck Lewis has had a long career as an investigative journalist. He has worked for national news shows, including CBS News' "60 Minutes," and he helped to create the Center for Public Integrity. 

But in the decades since he started digging for the truth, the reporting industry has suffered a serious decline in investigative reporting.

Chuck Lewis
American University

Chuck Lewis has had a long career as an investigative journalist. He has worked for national news shows, including CBS News' "60 Minutes," and he helped to create the Center for Public Integrity. 

But in the decades since he started digging for the truth, the reporting industry has suffered a serious decline in investigative reporting.

Fewer news outlets are spending the time and money for investigations in favor of daily news blurbs, breaking news coverage, or entertainment.

Image of H.L. Mencken
Flickr/Union-Square

 

H.L. Mencken was a columnist, author and journalist regarded as one of the most influential American writers from the early 20th century.

A new memoir by UNC's Kenan Visiting Writer Daisy Hernández
A Cup of Water Under My Bed Book Cover

This was originally broadcasted on 10/21/2014

Daisy Hernández grew up between cultures as a first-generation American child of a working-class Colombian mother and Cuban father. 

Her family hoped that she’d “become white,” but she struggled to meet their demands while forming an identity of her own. Her new memoir, A Cup of Water Under My Bed (Beacon Press/2014), traces her journey, weaving stories of religion and family with details about a new world away from home, where she developed a new political consciousness, came out as bisexual, and worked as a feminist journalist. 

Cover of the book A Cup of Water Under My Bed
Cover Image of the book A Cup of Water Under My Bed

  

Daisy Hernández grew up between cultures as a first-generation American child of a working-class Colombian mother and Cuban father. 

Book cover shows newspaper stands
uncpress.unc.edu

The advent of the internet forced many industries to adjust, and newspapers were no exception. To deal with new competition and the changing face of advertising, community papers are reaching across platforms. A new book, "Saving Community Journalism: The Path to Profitability" (The University of North Carolina Press/2014) seeks to assist local papers in that transition.

 

Ed Williams spent almost half a century writing for newspapers in Mississippi and North Carolina. His journalism career started at The Daily Mississippian and continued through 35 years at The Charlotte Observer.

Sunshine Week Icon
sunshineweek.org

This week is Sunshine Week, a time when newsmakers and advocates push for increased transparency in government. North Carolina public records law gives citizens and journalists equal access to information and mandates that all requests be responded to "as promptly as possible."

The Editor and the Dragon
south.unc.edu / Southern Oral History Program

A new film debuts on UNC-TV tonight, Thursday January 9th. "The Editor and The Dragon: Horace Carter Fights The Klan" tells the inside story of a man of courage, the journalist Horace Carter.

Filmmakers describe the story this way:

Journalist Audra Ang spent seven years reporting from China.
Greg Baker

Audra Ang worked as a foreign correspondent for the AP in Beijing, China for seven years. 

Nicholas Dawidoff's new book Low Collision Crossers is a look inside a year in the life of the New York Jets.
Little, Brown

  

To outsiders, football may look like bone-crushing mayhem.  The headlines coming out of the NFL center around concussions and bullying.

The city of Raleigh hosts the Wide Open Bluegrass Festival this weekend.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tsolson/ / flickr

  

Thousands of bluegrass fans will pour into downtown Raleigh this week for the Wide Open Bluegrass Festival. 

Amazon.com

  Originally broadcast March 13, 2013

The Pew Research Center released its annual State of the Media report for 2012, and television news viewership is down. Political coverage has declined, and on local TV news, 40 percent of the content is made up of traffic, sports and weather. Meanwhile, newspaper newsrooms in 2012 employed 40,000 people, the smallest number of full-time journalists since 1978.

Cover of Jon Buchan's book, 'Code of the Forest'
http://www.jon-buchan.com/code-of-the-forest/

South Carolina lawyer Jon Buchan is fond of saying that all journalists and attorneys have at least one good novel in them. He's been mulling his for years, but he's finally finished and published it. "Code of the Forest" tells the story of a scrappy newspaper, trying to survive an onslaught by a senator determined to silence it. It examines the subtle underpinnings of corruption.

Buchan says that corruption, as he portrays it in his book, is a much more subtle form of influence. One that might infect a politician before they realize it's too late.


As the media covered the tragic Boston Marathon bombing, they also made mistakes. News outlets, with reputations built on truth and accuracy, spent air-time speculating rather than reporting.  Some of the early, incorrect reports posed threats to innocent people who were wrongly-implicated in the bombing.

Staffers from Carolina Connection, a student-run radio program, present the work on the State of Things.  From left: Instructor Adam Hochberg, Wesley Graham, Mike Rodriguez, Kirsten Chang, James Kaminsky, and Mark Haywood.
Shawn Wen

A group of student journalists is getting a course in professional radio reporting at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  The class has opened a world of experience to them. One of the students, Mark Haywood, had the opportunity to report on an incident of human trafficking right in his hometown of Randolph County, North Carolina. 

npr.org

During Superstorm Sandy, the HMS Bounty - a 180 foot, three-masted, wooden ship - was tossed about helplessly in the middle of a raging storm. Two members of the ship's crew died, and the remaining 14 members had to be dramatically rescued by the Coast Guard. A member of the Coast Guard snapped this photograph on his phone from a helicopter that day:

Amazon.com

The Pew Research Center released its annual State of the Media report for 2012, and television news viewership is down. Political coverage has declined, and on local TV news, 40 percent of the content is made up of traffic, sports and weather. Meanwhile, newspaper newsrooms in 2012 employed 40,000 people, the smallest number of full-time journalists since 1978.

North Carolina native Robert Lee Vann was a pioneer of journalism during his lifetime. He served as editor of "The Pittsburgh Courier" which was the largest black newspaper in circulation until Vann’s death in 1940. He was recently commemorated in his hometown of Ahoskie, NC with a long-earned historical marker. Marvin Jones of the Chowan Discovery Group and Cash Michaels, editor of The Carolinian, join host Frank Stasio to talk about both Vann's legacy and the legacy of the black press.

Bo Xilai was a fast-rising politician in China. His sudden downfall plays out like a soap opera, with stories of corruption, hidden money, and murder. This story was picked up by the international press, but the details first broke on a Chinese language website called Boxun.com, which is run out of an office in Durham, NC. Host Frank Stasio will take a look at citizen journalism, working from half a world away with Watson Meng, the founder and editor of Boxun.com, and Scott Savitt, a China journalist and translator.

Lionel Shriver’s latest novel “The New Republic” (Harper/2012) tackles terrorism, journalism and the codependent relationship between the two.

Researchers at Duke University are making it easier for citizen journalists and traditional media companies to work together.

Many of the stories told during the Arab spring were not coming from traditional media organizations - or professional reporters. They were told in photos and videos captured on smartphones by people in their own neighborhoods.

Landon Cox is a computer scientist at Duke. He and a group of researchers there have come up with YouProve, smartphone software that solves two key problems with citizen journalism.