Intellectual Property

James Boyle comes on The State of Things to discuss the shrinking public domain.
Duke University's Center for the Study of the Public Domain

In the public domain, work can be freely shared online, translated into other languages, or republished and cheaply distributed.  

When Congress reconvenes after Labor Day, it will have the opportunity to consider a major expansion of online antipiracy law. The Protect-IP Act, which passed unanimously out of a Senate committee in May, would allow the government to seek a court order against a Web site allegedly violating copyright – and that site could then be entirely removed from the Internet. Industry groups including the Motion Picture Association of America and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce support the bill, but consumer rights groups and free speech advocates oppose it as a threat to a free and open Internet.