Now that the holidays are over, another season has arrived. It's time for children to put pen to paper and scratch out thank you letters — all under the watchful eye of their parents.

In a recent piece for The Guardian, Peter Ormerod argues that it's time to do away with that ritual. He writes that thank you letters "represent arguably the first instance in our lives when insincerity is officially sanctioned, which is particularly sad given that the best thing about children is their honesty."

The Turkey Man

Nov 26, 2014
Photo of Mike Davis is a turkey hunter turned turkey enthusiast who owns more than 700 turkey-themed items.
StarNews Online

Across the country on Thursday, Americans will consume the quintessential Thanksgiving food: turkey. 

Image of Sarah Hale, editor of Godey's Lady Book
Wikimedia Commons


Many people sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner may hearken back to some version of a story about Pilgrims and Native Americans feasting together. 

It's A Wonderful Life

From Elf to Home Alone and Love Actually to A Christmas Story, the tradition of a holiday film is as vital to some people as singing carols or decorating a tree. 

2 children, box of gift. Drawing

Angel trees are in many places in our communities: churches, malls. Each ornament on the tree has a child's name on it, and a list of gifts the child would like for the holidays. Human "angels" take the tag, go shopping, and return some of those gifts wrapped and ready in time for the holidays.

A new start-up company is trying to update the model.

"CommuniGift" is an online platform, designed to make finding and shopping for needy children and families easier.

It works a couple of different ways.