HB2

Transgender man Joaquin Carcano
Gerry Broome / AP

The law that replaced North Carolina's notorious "bathroom bill" sports a new look but maintains LGBT discrimination and prevents transgender people from using restrooms matching their gender identity, according to a lawsuit Friday.

downtown Raleigh skyline
NCDOTcommunications / Flickr, Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/bbmA6K

A record-setting 15.6 million tourists visited Wake County in 2016, up 3.5 percent from the previous year. Craft breweries, live music and museums were part of the draw, according to Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau President and CEO Dennis Edwards.

FILE - In this Tuesday, June 23, 2015 file photo NBA Commissioner Adam Silver speaks during a news conference to announce Charlotte, N.C., as the site of the 2017 NBA All-Star basketball game.
Chuck Burton / AP

The NBA All-Star game is headed back to Charlotte in 2019, a couple of years later than anticipated. The NBA announced that the All-Star weekend will be held Feb. 15-17 in Charlotte and the game will be played at the Spectrum Center, home of the Charlotte Hornets.

The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse seen from the light keepers house in Buxton. The lighthouse was put in service in 1870 and is the world's tallest brick lighthouse at 208 feet. Its beacon can be seen 20 miles out at sea.
Cliff Owen / Associated Press

House Bill 2 apparently did not dampen tourism in 2016.

North Carolina recorded a record $22.9 billion in visitor spending last year, according to figures recently put out by the Department of Commerce.

That’s an increase of 4.3 percent from 2015 and supported more than 218,000 tourism jobs, according to commerce.

Credit Suisse will add 1,200 jobs in Research Triangle Park
Credit Suisse / Flickr

Financial services giant Credit Suisse will add 1,200 new jobs in North Carolina and invest more than $70 million at its Research Triangle Park campus, the company announced Tuesday.

FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2015, file photo, Penn State's Frannie Crouse (9) jumps for a header as teammate Emily Ogle, left, watches during the NCAA Women's College Cup soccer final against Duke in Cary, N.C.
Ben McKeown, File / AP

The NCAA has awarded Division I championships to Greensboro, Winston-Salem, Raleigh and Cary over the next four years.

The LEAF Project / Flickr/ Creative Commons

State lawmakers have repealed the controversial House Bill 2, but the Charlotte nondiscrimination ordinance that inspired the defunct law could still play a big role in that city's Mayoral race.

Rachel Seibel walks past signage being put up in preparation for the NBA All Star Game festivities this weekend, in New Orleans, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017. Charlotte won't be a ghost town this weekend, but it sure won't be buzzing like many had hoped.
Gerald Herbert / AP

Civil and human rights groups are decrying the NBA’s decision to make Charlotte eligible again to host the league's All-Star game.

NCAA
NCAA

The NCAA says it will consider North Carolina as a host for championship events again after the state rolled back a law that limited protections for LGBT people.

North Carolina forward Isaiah Hicks (4) drives against Duke in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game during the semifinals of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament, Friday, March 10, 2017, in New York.
Julie Jacobson / AP

The Atlantic Coast Conference is ready to start holding events again in North Carolina after the state rolled back a law that limited protections for LGBT people.

North Carolina State Capitol, Raleigh.
Jim Bowen / Flickr

The replacement bill for House Bill 2 has been signed into law by Gov. Roy Cooper. Cooper called House Bill 142 a compromise between state lawmakers from both sides of the aisle. 

North Caorlina lawmakers debate a compromise to repeal House Bill 2 on March 30, 2017.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Updated 6:48 p.m. 3/30/2017

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper has signed a compromise measure to repeal House Bill 2, the controversial law that limits protections for LGBT people.

LOGAN ULRICH / WUNC

Prominent leaders from the North Carolina General Assembly have taken the reigns and are working to rewrite the controversial House Bill 2. 

North Carolina legislative building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

This week in state politics, Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation and Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch discuss efforts to change HB2 on the occasion of its first anniversary. They also discuss the first override of a Governor Cooper veto- judicial elections in North Carolina will once again be partisan contests.

Logan Ulrich / WUNC

House Bill 2 sparked national discussion after it was introduced in the North Carolina legislature in March 2016. At the center of HB2 was whether transgender people should have the right to use public bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity rather than the biological sex listed on their birth certificate. One year later, the debate over HB2 continues.

a bathroom sign at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham
Gerry Broome / AP

A year ago, state legislators passed House Bill 2, a controversial law that almost immediately set off a national debate about public safety, common sense, and government authority. 

HB2's Impact: Politics

Mar 23, 2017
A composite photo of former Gov. Pat McCrory (left) and current Gov. Roy Cooper (right).
Logan Ulrich / WUNC

One year ago, House Bill 2 moved through the General Assembly and was signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory. A frenzied political day amplified partisan bickering, triggered unintended consequences, and established a divisive law that remains on the books.


A young soccer fan poses for a photo in front of a giant inflatable soccer ball outside of WakeMed Soccer Park prior to the NCAA Women's College Cup final between Penn State and Duke in Cary, N.C., Sunday, Dec. 6, 2015.
Ben McKeown / AP

Legislators have spent much of the past year - even the last few weeks - posturing on House Bill 2's pros and cons, without any action. But perhaps the most tangible impact of the law has been on the business front.


HB2's Impact: Legal

Mar 23, 2017
In this photo taken Thursday, May 5, 2016 Joaquin Carcano is shown at his home in Carrboro, N.C. Carcano, a 27-year-old transgender man, works for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After HB2 passed, he found himself in a difficult position
Gerry Broome / AP

Politically, and economically, the question swirling around HB2 is when. When—or will—the legislature reach consensus and repeal the controversial law? Legally, however, the question is: what now?


HB2's Impact: Schools

Mar 23, 2017
Hunter Schafer and her parents Katy and Mac
Allen G. Breed / AP

At the heart of the HB2 court case is the question of which bathroom and locker room transgender students are allowed to use in public schools. For one of the plaintiffs in the case, HB2 has made life much more complicated.


In this photo taken Thursday, May 5, 2016 Payton McGarry is reflected in the entrance at his workplace, Replacements Ltd. in McLeansville, N.C.
Gerry Broome / AP

After state legislators passed House Bill 2 last year, transgender rights took center stage in North Carolina - and across the United States.


All Our HB2 Coverage

Mar 23, 2017
The LEAF Project / Flickr/ Creative Commons

House Bill 2 has had a significant impact on North Carolina's image and economy. WUNC - North Carolina Public Radio has covered the story since the law passed on March 23, 2016. 

 

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics,  an analysis of Gov. Roy Cooper's first State of the State address. Cooper used the phrase "common ground" 13 different times, called again for a repeal of the controversial House Bill 2 and touted the largely-symbolic budget plan as a vehicle to invest in education and  teachers.

a young man holding a pride flag
Emma / Flickr, Creative Commons

LGBTQ people face a high risk of physical and sexual violence and harassment, according to Triangle-based nonprofit research institute RTI International.

Image of bathroom sign
The LEAF Project / Flickr Creative Commons

The North Carolina plaintiffs fighting House Bill 2 in federal court face more legal uncertainty after Monday's U.S. Supreme Court decision.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

The week in North Carolina politics, lawmakers and Governor Roy Cooper continued their spat over confirmation powers.

Image of bathroom sign
The LEAF Project / Flickr Creative Commons

State lawmakers have filed a bipartisan bill to repeal House Bill 2 with some conditions.

The proposal got immediate backlash this week from other Democrats and LGBT rights groups who want a clean repeal of HB2, and it is not clear whether it has enough votes to pass.

Meanwhile, a committee in the state Senate has voted to issue a subpoena for Secretary of Military and Veterans Affairs Larry Hall after he failed to show up at three confirmation hearings.

Image of bathroom sign
The LEAF Project / Flickr Creative Commons

State lawmakers are making another attempt to repeal House Bill 2, the controversial state law passed last year that requires people to use the public bathrooms that correspond with the sex listed on their birth certificate.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper has put the HB2 ball back squarely in the legislature’s court, or so he hopes.

Governor Roy Cooper
Logan Ulrich / WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper laid out his vision for North Carolina in an inaugural address Saturday morning.

He said he wants to expand Medicaid, focus on economic problems instead of social issues, and called on lawmakers and residents to rise above partisan politics.

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