Liseuse Au  Bouquet De Roses (Woman Reading with a Bouquet of Roses) - Henri Matisse

French artist Henri Matisse was known for his use of color and his fluid and original draftsmanship. 

Durham Artist Rich James has like staying pretty anonymous while playing under the moniker of WowolfoL, but he's stepping out and into the light.

Music by the Durham-based Wowolfol band is difficult to describe. 

About 200 people use services at the IRC (Interactive Resource Center) each weekday.

Glimpses of poverty can be seen across North Carolina on a daily basis. From median strips to emergency rooms and school cafeterias to unemployment offices, no communities are immune.

In Greensboro many people in need use the Interactive Resource Center (IRC) for daily access to computers, showers, and a sense of community. More than 200 people visit the center each weekday.

"I went from $80,000 a year to, I'm lucky if I make $80 a month," says Earl Zayack, a slender man with brown hair and a salty goatee.

"So it was a huge, humbling experience for me."

Scene from "Frequency" (in picture actresses Lisa Gagnon and Meredith Sause).

 People rarely associate gay and lesbian films with the science fiction genre. But a Durham-based production company, KVWorks, created a sci-fi lesbian web series. 


Musician Laila Nur developed her “revolutionary love” music style when she moved alone to Greensboro at 19. 

A Fresh Tune For West Africa

Jul 11, 2014


Grounded in West African tradition and propelled by the funk and jazz of today, Africa Unplugged blends its own genre of music .

The Greensboro group explores new ways to formulate West African music on their new self-titled album.

The band performs as part of the “Find Your Cool” concert series at the CCB Plaza in Durham next Thursday.

Composed of artists, nurses, farmers and students, The Collection is as much a community as a band. The group, presently 15 members, easily expands and contracts as musicians come and go.They describe their sound as a rock band that tripped into an orchestra pit.

Trees in Chapel Hill,
Laura Candler

Officials with Duke Energy have decided to hold off on a program that would have used a chemical product, Cambistat, to slow the growth of trees near power lines. The utility planned to inject the application into the soil around trees.  The application would slow growth, reduce how often trees near power lines needed to be trimmed, and save money. But residents questioned the risks, and complained that they were being forced into the program. 

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

Members of the Greensboro City Council will get an update Tuesday afternoon about the downtown Civil Rights Museum.  Leaders in Greensboro were upset to learn late last week that part of a loan they approved was paid out before a written agreement went into place.  The city council agree d last fall to provide the Civil Rights Museum with a $1.5 million loan. 

Triad Update

Jan 21, 2014
The lunch counter where Greensboro students staged a civil rights sit-in protest on display in the National Museum of American History in Washington DC.
Wikipedia author RadioFan

 Franklin McCain, civil rights activist and one of the Greensboro Four, died this month. 

Dmitry Sitkovetsky
Greensboro Symphony

The State of Things will be Live at Triad Stage in Greensboro on January 21.

Frank Stasio will have a number of guests including the Azerbaijani violinist who has led the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra for more than a decade.

Musician, arranger and conductor Dmitry Sitkovetsky has performed across the globe: from Azerbaijan to Moscow and Los Angeles to New York.

For the last decade, he has served as music director of the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.

Sikovetsky will perform live on the Triad Stage.

Jaybird Williams of the Soul Central Band, grasping a microphone / Soul Central band


You may have seen him at Fincastles in downtown Greensboro. He’s dubbed “the singing waiter” for his profession and his passion. Bobby “Jaybird” Williams and the Soul Central band bring the funk, as well as the R & B and soul, to the Triad. Host Frank Stasio talks to them, and they play live at the Triad Stage in Greensboro. 

Rep. Howard Coble (R) is retiring next year. The race to replace him is already underway.
Jeff Tiberii

 Audio FileJeff Tiberii's report on candidates who want to succeed Congressman Howard Coble.Edit | Remove

Greensboro Performing Arts Center task force
Greensboro Performing Arts Center


Organizers behind a downtown performing arts center in Greensboro announced this week that the project is on schedule to break ground next fall.  The arts center will cost an estimated $65 million, with $30 million in funding from the city and $35 million in private donations from the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro (CFGG).

Mark Walker and Laura FJeld both hope to replace 83-year-old Howard Coble who is retiring after 30 years in Congress.
US House of Representatives

North Carolina’s longest serving Republican in the House of Representatives says he will not run for re-election.

Congressman Howard Coble of the sixth district first won his seat in 1984, and has been re-elected ever since then. Coble says he is mentally sharp, but some problems have made him change his mind about running again.

 Coble held a news conference at Guilford County’s Republican headquarters yesterday, recorded by WXII-TV. The 82-year-old said his back and skin cancer issues have begun to catch up with him.

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro


The Spartan Jazz Collective from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro is made up of students and faculty.

The group will perform a retrospective of work by percussionist composer and native North Carolinian Max Roach. The Spartan Jazz Collective is Chad Eby, Melvin Holland, Evan Ringel, Jonathan Wiseman, Thomas Linger, Aaron Gross, Kassem Williams, and Dr. Neeraj Mehta.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The struggling Civil Rights museum in Greensboro will receive a $1.5 million loan from the City. Museum leaders first asked for one and a half million dollars for educational programming earlier this year, than later said they needed the money to keep up with mortgage and loan payments. Members of the city council voted 6-3 Tuesday night and the city will provide half the money in the next 60 days.

Greensboro skyline
Scott Moore, Flickr, Creative Commons

Fundraisers of proposed Greensboro Performing Arts Center announced this week they’ve received $20.7 million dollars in pledged private support. Proponents of the project want to bring a venue similar to D-PAC to Greensboro. It’s estimated to cost $60 million  and the hope was to raise one third of that through private channels.

HealthServe is closing in Greensboro this week and 20,000 people will have to find a medical provider elsewhere.

The closing of the Healthserve Community Health Clinic in Greensboro is expected to affect thousands of low income patients. The clinic is closing, in part, because of the State legislature’s decision to reject federal Medicaid expansion. Host Frank Stasio talks to WUNC Greensboro Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii about this and other Triad news live from Triad Stage in Greensboro.

New River Breakdown by Terry L. Kennedy / Unicorn Press


Terry Kennedy wanted nothing more than to become a business maven and take over the world when he was in college. Literature was for people with too much free time on their hands. But he gradually learned that he was terrible at business and passionate for creative writing. Kennedy's latest book of poetry is called “New River Breakdown” (Unicorn Press/2013).  

Phive is a band based in Greensboro.
Phive, Facebook


Greensboro-based band Phive was previously known mainly for their work as a cover band. But they’ve expanded their sound recently, thanks in part to member Afika Nxumalo and his connection to South Africa. His mother grew up there, and her experiences helped inspire the band’s recent song commemorating Nelson Mandela’s birthday, “Madiba.”

HealthServe is closing in Greensboro this week and 20,000 people will have to find a medical provider elsewhere.

An estimated 20,000 patients will be affected by the closing of a health clinic in Greensboro later this month.  HealthServe provides care for people who are low-income, and have little or insufficient health insurance. The clinic began as a volunteer effort by local doctors in the 1990s. HealthServe has lost funding from the County and Moses Cone Hospital. The State’s recent decision to not expand Medicaid was the third strike.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro has formally asked city leaders for $1.5 million in funding.

Since the museum opened in 2010, it has run an annual deficit and failed to meet attendance goals. Museum leaders floated the idea of asking the city to help fund educational programs.

Raleigh Mayor Charles Meeker and Mayor-elect Nancy McFarlane

Today was the candidate filing deadline for several area mayoral races. Mayors in Durham, Raleigh and Greensboro will faces challenges in their bids for reelection.

In Durham, current mayor Bill Bell will be running for re-election with challenges from East Durham minister Sylvester Williams and Michael Valentine, a current member of the Durham Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee.

Phive is a band based in Greensboro.
Phive, Facebook

Greensboro band Phive has released a new single dedicated to Nelson Mandela. They made the announcement yesterday on Mandela Day, the birthday of the South African leader. Phive spoke with PRI's the World from WUNC's studios in Durham. You can listen to the interview here.

Here's the music video of their new song, "Madiba."