Ft. Bragg Stories

Paratroopers with the 82nd Airborne Division wait after being fitted with parachutes for a training jump at Fort Bragg, NC, on July 26, 2017.
Credit Matt Couch / WUNC - North Carolina Public Radio

WUNC wants to hear your stories about Ft. Bragg’s first 100 years.  We’re gathering first-person accounts of life on and around the post – from the World Wars to the 21st century. 

We’ve partnered with The Fayetteville Observer and WUNC’s American Homefront Project, a national initiative that reports on military and veterans issues for public radio. We’re collecting your stories now. We’ll broadcast and publish them on WUNC, in the Fayetteville Observer, and online.

We’ll also host a storytelling session Saturday, Nov. 4 the Airborne and Special Operations Museum in Fayetteville.  The free public event will feature a curated hour of your stories, as told by veterans, active duty service members, and other people in the Ft. Bragg community.  It will begin just after the  Fayetteville Veterans Day Parade.

Have a story to share?  Get started by filling out our form.

Ways to Connect

On Veterans Day, WUNC presents stories recorded during a live storytelling event at the Airborne and Special Operations Museum in Fayetteville, NC.  The hour long broadcast is hosted by Eric Hodge. Hear these stories Saturday, November 11 at 2 p.m. on North Carolina Public Radio.

Over the hour you'll hear from active duty soldiers and veterans who share their Ft. Bragg Stories. You can listen to the broadcast online, too:

Ft Bragg Stories A mixed 'chalk' of U.S. and British paratroopers line up to board a C-130 transport plane for the main jump of the joint exercise.
Jay Price / North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

North Carolina is home to the largest U.S. military installation in the world by population. It employs more than 50,000 military and close to 30,000 civilians and contributes tens of billions of dollars to the state’s economy.

Retired Army Colonel Fred Black came to Fort Bragg as a second lieutenant platoon leader in 1968. He remembers the sense of pride and accomplishment among the men of the 82nd Airborne Division.

William Weaver was 14 and a rising high school sophomore in the fall of 1964.

He was also one of 14 black students integrating the all-white West High School in Knoxville, Tenn.

"As soon as we got into the school, the principal was calling the roll. He said, 'Bill Weaver,' and I said, 'My name is William.' And he said, 'Oh, you're a smart N-word.' I'd been in school maybe 30 minutes and he suspended me," Weaver, 67, says, while recounting his first day at school during a recent visit to StoryCorps.