Feminism

Breathing Back

Feb 24, 2015
Breathing Back: A Meditation Chorus is now on display at The Carrack.
Alexis Pauline Gumbs / http://thecarrack.org/exhibit/breathingback/

  The final words uttered by Eric Garner, "I can't breathe," have become a mantra for protesters across the nation speaking out against police brutality.

Two Durham-based artists have repurposed the phrase for a new cause: to help outraged and exhausted communities connect to a legacy of activism and build resources for their long-term spiritual, emotional and physical resilience. They call it “Black Feminist Breathing.”

Creative Commons/ Wellcome Library, London

Writer Megan Mahew Bergman describes her newest collection of short stories as “10 years of my reading life.” Almost Famous Women (Scribner/2015) is historical fiction that explores the lives of powerful and unusual women who have remained in the margins of history. The stories range from an account of conjoined twins who were sold into show business in North Carolina, to the life and legacy of Africa’s first female horse trainer. Host Frank Stasio talks to Megan Mahew Bergman about women who took risks, broke rules, and disrupted cultural and gender norms in the early to mid 20th century.

Image of La Bête Magique performing at The Casbah
Tim Walter

For much of music history, rock music has been considered a boys club. 

A photo of a girl near a Girls Rock poster.
Girls Rock NC

Girls Rock NC is turning 10 years old this summer.  The series of week-long day-camps gathers girls of varying ages and musical abilities to form bands.  They write original music and play a show at the end of the week. 

But tonight, some male musicians are covering songs by female artists at the Haw River Ballroom in Saxapahaw to benefit the nonprofit.  With me this morning is Girls Rock NC founder Amelia Shull, and Stu McLamb of the band The Love Language

Toward a Womanist Ethic of Incarnation Black Bodies the Black Church and the Council of Chalcedon
us.macmillan.com / macmillan

In many black churches, women do the administrative work, raise funds, and educate the congregation's children. It is rare to find black women in higher leadership roles like preachers and pastors. Eboni Marshall Turman is the director of black church studies at Duke Divinity School, and author of Toward a Womanist Ethic of Incarnation: Black Bodies, the Black Church, and the Council of Chalcedon (Palgrave Macmillan; 2013). 

Diya Abdo headshot
http://www.guilford.edu/about/faculty-staff/profile/index.aspx?linkid=370&moduleid=17

 

Growing up as a Palestinian in Jordan, Diya Abdo straddled multiple cultures. Her love of American literature brought her to the United States. 

Black and White photograph of Workers Marching in Roanoke Rapids
south.unc.edu

    

In the 1970s, the small town of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina was dominated by the J.P. Stevens textile mills, which controlled many aspects of its workers' lives. 

Homeward Bound: The New Domesticity by Emily Matchar
Emily Matchar / http://emilymatchar.com

What’s going on with the youth these days?  Some are getting into knitting sweaters. Others are tending to backyard chicken coops. They are cheesemaking, canning, beekeeping and growing their own vegetables. These labor-intensive homemaking projects may be more than a trend towards rustic pleasures.

Transforming Knowledge: Public Talks on Women's Studies 1976-2011 by Jean Fox O'Barr
http://www.shewrites.com/ / She Writes Press

    

Jean Fox O'Barr was denied a teaching job at Duke University in the late 1960s. The reason? Her gender.  But later a few years later, with a shortage of professors, they asked O’Barr to join the political science department. She went on to found the Duke women's studies department and co-founded the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. 

Hannah Shaw

Mount Moriah fans are familiar with Heather McIntyre’s heart-wrenching vocals.  But they may not be familiar with her work with the summer camp Girls Rock NC.  In fact, several fan favorites of the Triangle music scene support Girls Rock, including singer-songwriter Laura Thurston and Maria Albani of Schooner.

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