Electric Cars

John Stender, program participant
Leoneda Inge

Tinkering with the family car used to be good training for getting a job at a body shop or a garage. But the vehicles rolling off assembly lines these days are so high-tech, a whole new generations of workers is needed to repair them.

There's a new degree program at Fayetteville Tech designed to fill the growing demand for highly-trained mechanics.

Jon Stender is one of the first students to enroll in the new collision repair and refinishing technology two-year degree program.

A picture of a man charging an electric car.
David Dodge / Green Energy Futures via Creative Commons

Eight different auto manufacturers and 15 different utility companies are teaming up with the Electric Power Research Institute to test technology that will allow them to determine when electric cars can recharge.

A picture of a man charging an electric car.
David Dodge / Green Energy Futures via Creative Commons

As more alternative fuel vehicles take to the roadways, North Carolina is working to prepare first responders how to react when they're part of an emergency.

The NC Solar Center has worked with the State Fire Marshall's office to develop a workshop for emergency services personnel in the Triangle. Soon, responders in other parts of the state will be able to complete the training online. They'll learn to identify gas, biofuel and battery-operated vehicles.

Electric Car
Leoneda Inge

A new North Carolina State University study challenges common assumptions connecting electric vehicles and lower emissions.  

Electric vehicle fuel costs are about one third the amount a conventional car spends on fuel in North Carolina.
Wikimedia Commons

Researchers at NC State University have come up with a safer and more efficient way to wirelessly transfer power. They’re working toward creating a process to charge electric cars that are in motion. The team of engineers has recently improved a process to send power from a stationary source to a mobile receiver.  The long-term goal is to have highway charging stations that run along the road, and would power electric vehicles.

Electric vehicle fuel costs are about one third the amount a conventional car spends on fuel in North Carolina.
Wikimedia Commons

A new tool on the US Department of Energy’s website allows users in each state to compare the price of power for an electric car to the cost of driving the same distance using gasoline. In North Carolina, a gallon of regular, unleaded fuel costs an average of $3.41. The equivalent amount of electricity costs about a third of that- an average of $1.02. That’s 12 cents less than the national average.

One of NC DOT's electric vehicle charging stations.
NCDOT

The North Carolina DOT says it had to remove four electric vehicle charging stations from rest areas due to conflicting state and federal laws. 

Transportation officials collected the stations before a state law took effect in March.  The law directed the DOT to find a way to charge drivers for using the stations.  But a federal law says states can only collect money from rest areas if it comes from vending machines. 

The stations were in place for 14 months and the DOT says 146 vehicles used them during that time. 

The 'Chevy Volt' is one of the more popular 'Plug-in' electric vehicles in North Carolina.
Leoneda Inge

A new readiness plan aims to help the state of North Carolina prepare for hundreds of thousands of electric vehicles on the road in the next decade.  The state’s first Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) readiness plan was created through the 'NC PEV Readiness Initiative: Plugging-in from Mountains to Sea (M2S).' 

The City of Raleigh will be one of the first US cities to try out new wireless technology for electric vehicles.   

Just like everything else – even electric vehicle charging stations are going wireless. 

Evatran Video:  Unleash your EV. To learn more, visit Plug-less Power dot com.

Accelerating Electric Cars Into More Cities

Jun 26, 2012

Transportation officials from eight states are meeting in Raleigh today to brainstorm how to accelerate the use of electric cars.

Asma Khalid: If you drive around Raleigh-Durham, you've probably noticed a few electric car charging stations.  But, that's not typical for most states. Since January 2011, approximately 30,000 electric vehicles have been sold in the entire country. So, clearly the Triangle is ahead of the curve. Judi Greenwald is with the center for Climate and Energy Solutions. Her group is cosponsoring the Raleigh meetings.

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