Education

Duke to Offer Free Online Classes

Jul 18, 2012

Duke University will begin offering free online classes to the public this September.

Asma Khalid: Duke faculty have signed up to teach eight internet classes. They range from neuroscience to astronomy.  So why fork out more than $40,000 a year for tuition if you can access these high-quality Duke professors for free?  Lynne O'Brien is organizing the partnership at Duke. And she says these online classes won't replace the on-campus experience.

Wake County School officials are praising students and staff at 4 of the district’s elementary schools for demonstrating higher proficiency on test scores.

Dave DeWitt: The four “Renaissance Schools” are Barwell, Brentwood, Creech Road, and Wilburn. They’re located in different parts of the county, but all serve a predominately low-income population.

Hal Kwalwasser's examination of successful American school districts continues today with a look at Watauga County in western North Carolina. Kwalwasser documented the dedication of Watauga's teachers and how they work with families to make sure that students thrive in school in his book, “Renewal: Remaking America's Schools for the 21st Century” (R & L Education/2012). He joins host Frank Stasio again for the second part of our conversation on education reform.

Two of North Carolina’s private institutions of higher education are partnering with a non-profit chain of charter schools.

Dave DeWitt: Duke University and Davidson College are entering into an agreement with the KIPP schools. KIPP, short for Knowledge is Power Program, is a network of charter schools operating in 20 states. There are currently 2 KIPP schools in North Carolina, in Charlotte and Gaston. They are open enrollment charter schools, with an emphasis on preparing low-income students for college.

Hal Kwalwasser was an anti-trust lawyer before becoming counsel to the Los Angeles Unified School District. He applied his legal skills to America's educational policy to break down the problems and find the solutions recorded in his new book, “Renewal: Remaking America's Schools for the 21st Century” (R & L Education/2012).

PNC is investing a million dollars in North Carolina to spur the economy and boost preschool education.

Asma Khalid: The Pittsburgh-based bank is collaborating with Wake County Public Schools, Carolina Ballet and the North Carolina Museum of Art to introduce low-income students to the arts.

Wake County Superintendent Tony Tata welcomes the PNC initiative.

Experts and educators are coming together today to discuss an economic transformation for Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Leoneda Inge:  The down economy has not been kind to higher education and Historically Black Colleges and Universities, or HBCUs have suffered even more. Andrea Harris is president of the North Carolina Institute of Minority Economic Development.  She has invited black college leaders and the head of the White House Initiative on HBCUs to debate the financial survival of these institutions.

Education leaders in Guilford County are looking at how private donations would affect public schools.

Jeff Tiberii: A group of parents at one Greensboro Elementary School wants to go beyond the average book or bake sale. They’re hoping to raise $1.5 million for a new building. School board members are considering both sides of an issue that would likely provide some schools with more private money than others. Chairman of the board Alan Duncan:

Poetic Justice P.S.: American Graduate Part 3

Jun 15, 2012

Graduation ceremonies are pretty much done but we have a P.S. for you, A poetic P.S. As part of WUNC's participation in the American Graduate Project, we commissioned slam poets Kane Smego and Will McInnerney to host an after-school writing workshop at Northern High School in Durham. And they did- for ten weeks. They're here to tell the stories of two young people who grabbed onto words and held tight.

The Chapel Hill - Carrboro school district will get its first magnet school school in 2013. But not all parents are happy about it.

Dave DeWitt: The Chapel Hill - Carrboro School Board voted 5 to 1 to turn Frank Porter Graham Elementary into a magnet school. It will offer a Spanish-English Dual Language program.

Some parents at Frank Porter Graham had opposed the change. Parents at other schools that will lose their dual language programs also fought the decision.

Pages