Durham Arts Council

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In the 1930s, the federal government started to map out regions deemed financially stable enough to receive mortgage assistance through a process called “redlining.” The areas identified as “too risky” for loans were largely concentrated in minority and low-income neighborhoods. During the same time, the City of Durham implemented tree-planting programs across various neighborhoods.

Cervantes Is Among Us, one photo that's part of the 'I am Quixote/Yo Soy Quixote' arts exhibit on view at the Durham Arts Council.
Jean-Christian Rostagni

This year marks the 400th anniversary of Miguel De Cervantes' infamous two-part novel “El Quixote.” It is considered by many to be the first modern novel, and its themes continue to resonate with today’s artists and thinkers.

To celebrate the anniversary, Triangle-based artist Rafael Osuba coordinated a 7-month long festival, “El Quixote Festival,” that gathers artists around the state to share works that reflect the character and spirit of Don Quixote.

Durham Art, Mariott City Center, Durham Sculpture
Leoneda Inge

Durham community leaders, artists and residents are working to make sure downtown remains people-friendly as it grows.

After a year of getting to know Durhamites, award-winning Landscape Architect and Environmental Artist Mikyoung Kim presented an art infused vision plan for downtown Durham.  Kim’s job was to connect the corridor between the Old Durham Bulls Ballpark and the new one.