Duke University

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James Joseph grew up in the heart of Klan country in Louisiana.

He vowed to one day earn the respect of the racist leaders. Years later, he became the first ambassador to South Africa to present his credentials to Nelson Mandela. Host Frank Stasio talks to James Joseph, professor emeritus of the practice of public policy at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy.

Mandela, Mary and james Joseph shaking hands
Joseph family archives

Nelson Mandela was a global icon who had an incredible humility. And one of the interesting things I remember about my experience is that when I presented my credentials to Mandela, as the U.S. Ambassador, he invited my wife and I to have tea with him afterwards. And we were sitting there, both of us thinking, ‘How do we approach asking Mr. Mandela to take a picture with us?’

South Sudanese Writer and Duke Student, Nyuol Tong
selfsudan.org / Self Sudan

When Nyuol Tong was six years old, his family was caught in the crossfire of the Sudanese Civil War. After living in Sudanese refugee camps, and Egypt, Tong made his way to the United States. 

When Nyuol reflects on his life in Sudan and Egypt, he talks about the constant shifting he had to do in order to survive. 

Jessica Jones
Jessica Jones

Every college football season, there’s usually one team that turns out to be a surprise. This year, it’s Duke.

The Blue Devils have won ten games-- the most in school history. It’s a big turnaround for a team long overshadowed by basketball and a laughingstock of the Atlantic Coast Conference. But now, Duke is headed to the ACC championship game.

The team earned its invitation to the ACC over the weekend, after it beat UNC.  At a sports bar near campus, lifelong Duke fans Larry Goss and Bobbi Harris hugged each other with tears in their eyes.

Wesley Hogan
Christopher Sims, via CDSPorch.com

Wesley Hogan's interest in storytelling stretches back to her childhood. 

Creative Commons

Think you’re avoiding the advertisements when you fast forward through using your DVR?

Think again. New research from Duke’s Fuqua School of Business shows that sometimes commercials are even more effective when you’re not paying attention. Host Frank Stasio talks to Gavan Fitzsimons, a professor in Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

DSA Chorus
Leoneda Inge

The Fisk Jubilee Singers are known world-wide for their flawless voices and performance of Negro Spirituals.  Paul Kwami is the choir’s musical director and is on a five city, high school southern tour to personally help young voices hone and preserve the songs that have inspired people of all cultures.

Kwami’s first stop: The Durham School of the Arts.

duke.edu
duke.edu / duke.edu

Samuel Buell had an interest in justice from a young age. As a child, he sat in front of the TV with his parents and watched the Watergate hearings. He knew it was momentous, but he didn’t understand the exact significance until much later.

The Neuse River bike and pedestrian trail in Raleigh, forest, trees.
City of Raleigh

Researchers at Duke University have found evidence that climate change is shortening the life cycles of trees in the U.S.

Research in tropical areas like Peru has suggested that trees are migrating to cooler areas by producing offspring in higher elevations or latitudes, but the latest study says most plants in the U.S. might not be able to move quickly enough to keep up with rising temperatures. 

Transforming Knowledge: Public Talks on Women's Studies 1976-2011 by Jean Fox O'Barr
http://www.shewrites.com/ / She Writes Press

    

Jean Fox O'Barr was denied a teaching job at Duke University in the late 1960s. The reason? Her gender.  But later a few years later, with a shortage of professors, they asked O’Barr to join the political science department. She went on to found the Duke women's studies department and co-founded the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. 

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