Duke University

The State of Things
12:45 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

The Politics of Disgust

David Pizarro
Credit http://www.peezer.net/

  

Feelings of disgust can be a useful in navigating environmental threats. When we are disgusted, we avoid contaminated or poisonous things. But new research shows that disgust may also subconsciously influence our political and moral judgments. Psychology professor David Pizarro examines the ways disgust affects decision-making in the political realm.

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Arts & Culture
12:25 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

For All Your Southern Sound Needs, A Sonic Dictionary

Mary Caton Lingold talking to her Sounds of the South class
Credit Alex Granados

Duke University Junior Tom Shelbourn got his own version of culture shock when he took the Sounds of the South English class last semester.

He is from England, and when he attended a performance of the Fisk Jubilee Singers and listened to them sing  "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," he knew he'd heard the song before. But not like that.

"It's actually a chant that you will hear at every international rugby game," he said. "You will hear that song often louder than the national anthem at times."

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Education
8:24 am
Wed January 8, 2014

With 48 Hours, Duke Students ‘Rethink’ Education And Find New Ideas

First-place winners of Duke University's 'Rethink Education: The Innovation Challenge' Winter Forum pose for a picture. The team proposed an online database that can be shared between schools in North Carolina and India to improve STEM education.
Credit Reema Khrais / WUNC

A high tech pen-pal system shuttling messages,  knowledge and know-how between schools in Durham and those in India. A program that would have students repair bicycles as a part of their studies. How about older students teaching younger students through video tutorials? Or paying high achieving students to tutor?

These were some of the bright ideas cooked up by Duke undergrads for the “Rethink Education: The Innovation Challenge” winter forum at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business

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The State of Things
1:00 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

South Sudanese Duke Student Writes Of Home

Nyuol Tong, Duke student and writer, from South Sudan
Credit http://www.selfsudan.org/ / Self Sudan

  

When Nyuol Tong was six years old, his family was caught in the crossfire of the Sudanese Civil War. After living in Sudanese refugee camps, and Egypt, Tong made his way to the United States. 

When Nyuol reflects on his life in Sudan and Egypt, he talks about the constant shifting he had to do in order to survive. 

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The State of Things
1:20 pm
Fri December 27, 2013

What's Inside The Brains Of Songbirds

Duke scientists look into the brains of songbirds.
Credit johnholdway.com

Scientists are learning fascinating things by studying songbirds. 

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Salt marshes
8:38 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Duke Study: Salt Marshes Depend On Crabs, Snails And Fungus For Preservation

Salt marsh ecosystems depend on healthy biodiversity.
Credit Rob Bixby / RobBixbyPhotography, Flickr Creative Commons

A new study from Duke University shows the importance of maintaining key species to support biodiversity. 

Researchers manipulated the populations of crabs, snails and fungus in a salt marsh in Georgia.  Brian Silliman is an associate professor of marine conservation biology at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment.  He says each species provides an important function in preserving the marsh. 

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Science & Technology
3:00 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

How Strobe Lights Are Helping The Carolina Hurricanes Increase Performance

Carolina Hurricanes trainer Peter Friesen (left) watches as NHL goalie Justin Peters performs a drill with a tennis ball while wearing 'stroboscopic training' eyewear.
Credit Peter Friesen @NHLCanes / Carolina Hurricanes

It's pretty amazing to think that strobe lights in a club, the ones that make you kind of dizzy, could actually help our brains process images.

Duke researchers knew that they were on to something. They had done at least one other study on "stroboscopic visual conditions." So, they teamed up with some men whose livelihoods depend on visual acuity, hockey players, to test their theories out.

They designed special glasses with kind of an internal strobe light. The glasses intermittently let vision in, and then cut it off.

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The State of Things
11:15 am
Mon December 16, 2013

A Journey From Klan Country To South Africa

James Joseph
Credit duke.edu

James Joseph grew up in the heart of Klan country in Louisiana.

He vowed to one day earn the respect of the racist leaders. Years later, he became the first ambassador to South Africa to present his credentials to Nelson Mandela. Host Frank Stasio talks to James Joseph, professor emeritus of the practice of public policy at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy.

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Politics & Government
10:44 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Duke Prof: Nelson Mandela Asked Me To Take a Picture With Him

Nelson Mandela (left) with Mary and James Joseph
Credit Joseph family archives

Nelson Mandela was a global icon who had an incredible humility. And one of the interesting things I remember about my experience is that when I presented my credentials to Mandela, as the U.S. Ambassador, he invited my wife and I to have tea with him afterwards. And we were sitting there, both of us thinking, ‘How do we approach asking Mr. Mandela to take a picture with us?’

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The State of Things
11:38 am
Mon December 9, 2013

South Sudanese Duke Student Writes Of Home

South Sudanese Writer and Duke Student, Nyuol Tong
Credit selfsudan.org / Self Sudan

When Nyuol Tong was six years old, his family was caught in the crossfire of the Sudanese Civil War. After living in Sudanese refugee camps, and Egypt, Tong made his way to the United States. 

When Nyuol reflects on his life in Sudan and Egypt, he talks about the constant shifting he had to do in order to survive. 

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