Community Activism

Laura Pellicer

For close to two decades, Richard Joyner fought to get away from the farms of Pitt County, North Carolina. He grew up in a family of sharecroppers and repeatedly witnessed racial and economic injustices. His family was never properly compensated for their labor, and his father was treated poorly by white land owners.

Later in his life, Joyner became the pastor for the small 300-person community of Conetoe, North Carolina. Within one year, 30 of his congregants died from health-related illnesses. He decided to return to farming to grow healthy food for his community.

Jose Angel Figueroa

Iris Morales was among the first women to join The Young Lords, a Puerto Rican nationalist group founded in the late 1960s that aimed to fight the colonial status of Puerto Rico in addition to poverty and racial inequality within the United States.

An image of the book cover for 'Dancing in Damascus'
Routledge

In March 2011, many Syrians stood up in the midst of the Arab Spring to protest President Bashar al-Assad and demand the country’s leader step down. Since then, a tumultuous civil war has ensued between the government, its citizens and rebel extremists.

To Right These Wrongs  The North Carolina Fund and the Battle to End Poverty and Inequality in 1960s America
UNC Press / uncpress.unc.edu

    

In 1963, almost a quarter of North Carolinians were living in poverty. 

Governor Terry Sanford and his political associates decided it was time to get creative about building a strategy for eradicating poverty in the state. And with that, the North Carolina Fund was born.  The Fund was a way to sponsor community organizing initiatives in local communities across the state, particularly by getting poor people involved directly.