Community

Marchers and singers at the Poor People's Campaign, Washington DC. May-June 1968, Jimmy Collier is on the left, & Frederick Douglass Kirkpatrick on right.
Smithsonian Folkways / Smithsonian - Folkways - http://s.si.edu/2B1fejh

Music as a form of protest has a long history in the U.S. Activists have used songs to guide countless movements, from the abolition fight in the 1700s to anti-Vietnam War demonstrations and beyond.

Katie Wyatt poses with children from the program she co-founded, Kidznotes.
Ken Demery Photography

Katie Wyatt first fell in in love with classical music when she joined her school’s orchestra in third grade. Wyatt played the viola and appreciated being part of a group that created art together. Wyatt was a military kid, so her family moved around about every four years. But no matter where she lived, Wyatt found a way to plug into her community through music. 

Construction of the greenhouses in Cleveland that are part of the Evergreen Cooperative.
wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a2/Green_City_Growers.jpg

State lawmakers around the nation offer tax incentives to manufacturers in hopes of bringing new jobs to their state. But what happens when they strike out? Some believe that it’s possible to generate more jobs and community wealth by partnering with local institutions to build worker-owned businesses.