Comic Books

Black Panther, African Fashion, African Americans, Comic Books
Leoneda Inge

You can count on comic book superfans to dress-up like their favorite characters for a big movie premiere.  But the opening weekend of "Black Panther" has brought out new fans and new ware. The “Afrocentric” tone of the film has many moviegoers wanting to dress the part, from African-inspired jewelry to authentic Kente cloth.

photo of Victor Lawe dressed as  the black panther in the studio with host Frank Stasio
Dana Terry

Weeks before the release of "Black Panther," presale tickets were on course to outsell all other superhero movies. It was one of the most tweeted about movies of 2017, despite not having a release date until February of this year.  Host Frank Stasio takes a look at the buzz behind the movie with comic book aficionados and scholars.

Writers and artists: James Boyle, Keith Aoki, Jennifer Jenkins / Creative Commons

For centuries, musicians have borrowed and sampled from each other, creating musical evolution as they advance their own styles and careers. However, with each cycle of musical cross-fertilization comes attempts to police it.

A new comic book, “Theft! A History of Music” (James Boyle and Jennifer Jenkins/2017), dissects 2000 years of music history and its legacy of copyright and control.

NC Comicon
nccomicon.com

There was a time when comics meant thin paper booklets with drawings of superheroes. But today's comics fly beyond the page—they are multimedia experiences.

And comic conventions offer opportunities to see the latest on the intersection of traditional comics with movies, music, ebooks and video games.

Tommy Lee Edwards

Comicons, or conventions of comic fans, are best known for throngs of costume-clad attendees and access to the industry’s best comics creators. 

Cover to the first installment of John Lewis' March trilogy of graphic novels
topshelfcomix.com

Congressman John Lewis (D-Ga.) was once inspired to fight for civil rights by a comic book about Martin Luther King Jr. and his nonviolent protest in Montgomery, Alabama. 

Meghan Modafferi and Durham Comics Project

Superheroes are not the only characters to grace the pages of comic books. The Durham Comics Project invites ordinary people to tell their own stories in cartoon squares. Started by Amy Godfrey, a librarian at Durham County Library, the project seeks to illuminate the small and big moments that make a community. 

When comic book authors set out to construct their superheros, how do they factor in the believability of those characters’ powers?  And no matter how fantastic those powers may be, what is the importance of a good story in comic books?  Suveen Mathaudhu is a professor at NC State who studies the science of superheroes.  Host Frank Stasio talks with Mathaudhu and comic book creator Howard Craft.

NC Comicon

    

In its fourth year, the North Carolina Comicon is bringing groups of superhero creators, publishers and artists to the Durham Convention Center this weekend for a collection of nerdy goodness.

Some of the biggest names in comics will be there. And if that’s not enough, you might win a ride in the old-school Batmobile.

Jeremy Whitley, co-creator of Firetower Studios and the mind behind the comic “Princeless,” said this area is a prime spot for comic art.

Captain America's Shield
Pop Culture Geek/Flickr / creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

When you watch an X-men movie or read a Captain America comic, you can find a new way to look at material science. Superhero comics can be just as much science as they are magic.

Action Lab Entertainment / Jeremy Whitley

Comic book fans know the pleasure of becoming absorbed in an alternate world. One where weirdos and freaks reign supreme as superheroes and saviors. It’s the perfect escape for somebody that doesn’t feel as though they quite fit in. For Jeremy Whitley, comics were engrossing, so much so that he wanted to make his own. But then he had a daughter.