Charlottesville

Donald Trump
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP - 2017

President Trump continues to receive criticism after his remarks earlier this week about violence that took place last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in North Carolina politics, a conversation about unrest in Charlottesville; a Confederate statues comes down in Durham; and anti-white supremacists hold vigils across the Triangle. Meanwhile, Governor Roy Cooper calls for the removal of all Confederate statues across the state.

Confederate Monuments, Charlottesville, Durham County Monument
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

A crowd of people gathered in downtown Durham late Monday to witness the toppling of a long-time Confederate monument. 

Elena Ceberio

Hundreds have gathered across the Triangle in candlelight vigils for victims of the deadly attack in Charlottesville, Virginia. One day after a car plowed into a crowd of people counter-protesting a white supremacist rally, North Carolinians gathered at various sites to remember the slain 32 year-old Heather Heyer and 19 others who were injured.

Rescue personnel help injured people after a car ran into a large group of protesters after a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday.
AP Photo/Steve Helber

The events in Charlottesville over the weekend hit close to home for many North Carolinians. Debates over Civil War and Confederate monuments and the recent rise of white supremacists are certainly topics we’ve dealt with here in recent years. 

But for one woman from The Triangle, the deadly attack in Charlottesville was personal. Her name is Susan and we’re not including her last name because she fears reprisals from white supremacists.