Books

Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun's smiling self-portrait.
Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun / Wikimedia Commons

A white-toothed smile is a gesture that many likely engage in dozens of times a day without thought. Historian Colin Jones traced the history of the smile and found a toothy smile is a relatively young phenomenon. 

In his recent book, "The Smile Revolution In Eighteenth Century Paris," he argues that the white-tooth smile emerged in 18th century Paris in conjunction with the cult of sensibility and the creation of modern dentistry.

The Secret Game

23 hours ago
North Carolina College Eagles, 1943-1944, from left to right: George Parks, Aubrey Stanley, James “Boogie” Hardy, Floyd Brown, Henry “Big Dog” Thomas.
Alex Rivera

On a Sunday morning in March 1944, most of Durham, North Carolina, was in church. That's the way basketball coach John McLendon wanted it when his all-black college team from North Carolina Central University (then the North Carolina College for Negroes) faced off against an all-white team from Duke University’s medical school. 

N.C. State University professor Rupert Nacoste's latest book is "Taking on Diversity."
makinggumbo.com

Rupert Nacoste served in the U.S. Navy during military race riots in the 1970s.

His commanding officers chose him to facilitate conversations about race relations among his fellow sailors. The experience prompted him to pursue a career as a social psychologist. 

Katherine Stewart's book investigates a Bible study club with chapters in thousands of U.S. schools.
PublicAffairs

In 2009, journalist Katherine Stewart heard that something called The Good News Club was coming to her daughter’s public elementary school in Santa Barbara, California.

At first she thought its mission seemed benign, but once she began to look into the organization and how it operated, she felt compelled to dig in further.

Patrik Henry Bass is from Laurinburg, North Carolina and now he's the editorial projects director for Essence Magazine.
http://www.essence.com/

Patrik Henry Bass has spent the last 49 years searching for the extraordinary moments in life. 

As a child he found those moments in the books he devoured at the library—the stories he read carried him far beyond his hometown of Laurinburg, North Carolina. His love of literature led him to a career in journalism. Today he's an award winning writer and the editorial projects director of Essence Magazine.Host Frank Stasio talks with Bass about his life journey and the many careers that led him to his dream job in New York City as a curator in the literary world. 

The John Hope Franklin Young Scholars worked together to write and published a novel about a Durham teenager.
David Stein

More than 30 Durham Public School students recently published a novel that combines fact, fiction and illustration.

“Running For Hope” (John Hope Young Franklin Scholars Program/ 2015) is a creative attempt to explore the life story and impact of historian John Hope Franklin while documenting the modern-day challenges of growing up as a teenager living in a diverse community. It interweaves the fictional story of 9th grader Kendrick Parker with illustrated scenes from Mirror to America, an autobiography by John Hope Franklin. 

North Carolina writers share how their state inspires them in "Amazing Place: What North Carolina Means to Writers."
UNC Press

From Thomas Wolfe to Lee Smith, the state of North Carolina is home to a wealth of literary greats.

But what is it about the Tarheel State that inspires these authors? That's the prompt Marianne Gingher asked 21 North Carolina writers. Their answers form a new creative nonfiction collection called Amazing Place: What North Carolina Means to Writers (UNC Press/2015).

N.C. author Liza Wieland
East Carolina University

For North Carolina author Liza Wieland, three separate narratives converged to her new book, Land of Enchantment.

The novel traces the experiences of three multiracial women in three different parts of the country. The characters share common themes around love, loss, racial identity and art. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with writer and English professor at East Carolina University Liza Wieland.

David Joy's new book tells the story of a young man working for his father's meth ring in rural North Carolina.
David-Joy.com

Jacob McNeely grew up in the mountains of North Carolina.

A life of crime as an employee of his father's meth ring is the only one he has ever known. But a violent event and a reunion with his first love offer McNeely the possibility of escape. 

The men's basketball teams from UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University battle each other tonight for the 239th time.

The storied rivalry is notorious for dividing friends, family and coworkers over which shade of blue is best.

But in a rare collaboration, Tar Heel sportswriter Art Chansky and Blue Devil sports marketer Johnny Moore chronicled the history of the rivalry in the book, The Blue Divide (Triumph Books/2014). 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Chansky and Moore about the Tobacco Road rivalry that many call the greatest in sports.  

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