Learning To Cope With Extreme Narcissism

Nov 27, 2015
Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy for more than 30 years and has noticed an increase in narcissism in society.
Kathy Stanford

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

For more than 30 years, Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy. In that time, he noticed an increase in narcissism in society.

He sees it in the “selfies” people take or the idolization of celebrities with “me-first” attitudes.

Learning To Cope With Extreme Narcissism

Sep 23, 2015
Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy for more than 30 years and has noticed an increase in narcissism in society.
Kathy Stanford

For more than 30 years, Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy. In that time, he noticed an increase in narcissism in society.

He sees it in the “selfies” people take or the idolization of celebrities with “me-first” attitudes.

Narcissism exists on a spectrum from the benign qualities most people show from time to time to the diagnosable Narcissistic Personality Disorder, according to Burgo.

Image of Eric Wilson, who is a professor of English at Wake Forest University and the author of 'Keep It Fake.'
Wake Forest University

Eric Wilson argues that the often-said phrases "shoot straight from the hip," "tell it like it is," and "keep it real" are all fallacies.

We regularly create less-than-authentic identities, whether it is through Facebook profiles, plastic surgeries, or tuning into a news channel that simply verifies our opinions, according to Wilson.

But he also says we should embrace the ways we choose to show ourselves, even if they are "fake." After all, if everything is fake, then everything is real, too.

Book cover to 'The Cold Dish' which was the first instalment of the Longmire Mystery Series.

Walt Longmire is a fictional Wyoming county sheriff who returns to work after his wife's death. Assisted by his friends and his daughter, Longmire investigates major crimes within his jurisdiction while campaigning for re-election.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Longmire creator Craig Johnson about the Longmire Mystery Series and about the books becoming a popular television show on A&E and now Netflix. Johnson reads Saturday at 11 a.m. at McIntyre’s Books in Pittsboro and Sunday at 3 p.m. at Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh.

University of South Carolina Press

In his 13 years at the Raleigh News and Observer, J. Peder Zane says he tried to perfect the art of the newspaper column. 

Zane came to North Carolina in 1996 to be the paper's book review editor after years as a reporter for the New York Times. His journalism experience informed the way he would tackle his own commentary: by connecting today's newsmakers to the complex characters in American literature.

Author and activist Eileen Flanagan
She Writes Press

At 49, author and environmental activist Eileen Flanagan hardly recognized herself.

Her large home, her stocks in a hydraulic fracturing company and her family's multitude of unnecessary gadgets all seemed at odds with the way she lived three decades ago as a young Peace Corps volunteer in Botswana. 

Domestic Garden

Apr 30, 2015
John Hoppenthaler's new book of poems is an exploration of age and marriage.
Annie Hogan / Carnegie Mellon University Press

When John Hoppenthaler wrote his newest book of poetry, Domestic Garden (Carnegie Mellon University Press/2015), he was experiencing change in his personal life.

The poet and professor at East Carolina University married just before turning 50 years old, and he also became a stepfather. At the same time, his mother’s health was declining. 

The transitions became the backbone of his intimate and vulnerable poetry.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Hoppenthaler about his life, work and poetry.

Born To Run And Natural Born Heroes

Apr 28, 2015
Author Christopher McDougall

The myth of the modern hero is someone with exceptional abilities and extraordinary strength.

But author Christopher McDougall says becoming a hero is just a matter of tapping into the body's capability for natural movement. 

  Rather than hitting the gym, McDougall told Frank Stasio of WUNC's The State of Things, people should be exercising outdoors through activities that echo the movements humans evolved to do as hunter-gatherers.

Ursula Vernon's "Self-portrait."
Ursula Vernon

Ursula Vernon considers herself a “creator of oddities,” but she fell into this career by accident.

Her mother was a professional artist, so the artistic lifestyle held no mystery or appeal to her; she wanted to be a scientist. But after taking one art class in college she realized that art was her true calling.

Vernon has since authored a long-running text and graphic novel children’s book series called Dragonbreath and an award-winning adult comic called Digger.  

Host Frank Stasio talks to Ursula Vernon about her career, artistic style, and latest book “Castle Hangnail” (Dial Books for Young Readers/ 2015).

Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun's smiling self-portrait.
Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun / Wikimedia Commons

A white-toothed smile is a gesture that many likely engage in dozens of times a day without thought. Historian Colin Jones traced the history of the smile and found a toothy smile is a relatively young phenomenon. 

In his recent book, "The Smile Revolution In Eighteenth Century Paris," he argues that the white-tooth smile emerged in 18th century Paris in conjunction with the cult of sensibility and the creation of modern dentistry.