Basketball

Coach K
Jeff Tiberii

NC State and UNC are moving on in the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament. But Duke‘s season has come to an abrupt end.

Jeff Tiberii: The second seeded Blue Devils were shocked by the Lehigh Mountain Hawks, 75-70, in Greensboro on Friday night. Earlier in the day UNC beat Vermont 77-58 in the same building. And many Carolina fans hung around for the upset. Lehigh senior Jordan Hamilton:

Jeff Tiberii

The Men's NCAA basketball Tournament comes to Greensboro this week where North Carolina and Duke hope to survive and advance. The event typically brings tens of thousands of visitors and many millions of dollars to the region. On the floor the expectation is for some of the best basketball the sport has to offer. Off the court, there has been some timely madness as well.

The men's Atlantic Coast Conference regular season champion will be decided tomorrow. That's when North Carolina will travel up Tobacco Road to take on rival Duke. The two teams are tied for first place going into the final regular season game. Speaking on an ACC teleconference this week, Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said it's been a challenge to get to this point.

The ACC Women’s Basketball Tournament tips off tomorrow in Greensboro.

Jeff Tiberii: For the 13th consecutive year the event takes place at the Greensboro Coliseum. This season the conference boasts 3 of the top 10 Women’s teams in the nation: Duke, Miami and Maryland. Meanwhile, UNC-Chapel Hill finished fifth in the A-C-C during the regular season. Head coach Sylvia Hatchell has led her team to eight of the last 10 Tournament Championship games.

Wes Miller
Jeff Tiberii

Many veteran college basketball coaches have thinning hair, wrinkles and a scowl to protest questionable calls. This isn't the case at UNC Greensboro, where Wes Miller has a full head of hair, the smile of a college student and just two months of experience. He’s the youngest coach in men’s Division 1 and is trying to get his team to think about a championship, all while removing the ‘interim’ next to his name. Jeff Tiberii reports on the former Tar Heel turned Spartan.

Big-time college basketball is a way of life in North Carolina. It brings excitement and millions of dollars to the Triangle, and gives the region much of its identity. But actually playing in the Atlantic Coast Conference is out of reach for everyone but the most elite athletes. Except at UNC-Chapel Hill, where a Junior Varsity basketball team continues to prosper. It’s a one-of-a-kind opportunity for “regular” students.

Eagles Soar Into D1

Aug 12, 2011

The five-year wait is now over, and North Carolina Central is officially a member of the NCAA’s Division I.
 

The NC Central Board of Trustees voted back in 2005 to move from division 2 to division one. The move was somewhat controversial, as it meant the Eagles would no longer play in the popular CIAA basketball tournament.

The Eagles then played as an independent with no conference affiliation. Last year, NC Central was a provisional member of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference.

It’s been a difficult off-season for fans of NC State’s men’s basketball team. Alumnus Sidney Lowe was forced to resign as head coach in March. And last month, another former star, Lorenzo Charles, died in a bus accident.

On the court, the Wolfpack is trying to find its way under a new head coach. Mark Gottfried says he’s taking the team’s rebuilding effort one step at a time.

UNC Coach Roy Williams (left) and Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski Feb. 9, 2011 in Durham
goduke.com

The UNC and Duke men’s basketball teams square off Saturday night in Chapel Hill with the regular season conference title on the line. Both teams are 13-and-2 in the ACC. Tar Heels coach Roy Williams calls Duke an “unbelievable opponent.”

goduke.com

College basketball's March Madness is about to engulf fans across the country. At Duke University, an engineering professor says the usual suspects will dominate the NCAA Tournament. And Adrian Bejan says that can be explained by his theory of Constructal Law. He says great basketball players tend to wind up at the same colleges and universities in the same way water flows to a single point through many small streams that join bigger and fewer river channels.

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