2012 NC Primary

Ted Cruz visited a Raleigh Baptist church on Tuesday afternoon.

On Tuesday afternoon, Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz greeted supporters at a Raleigh Baptist church and taped a town-hall style interview with Megyn Kelly of Fox News.

He’s the latest presidential candidate to visit North Carolina ahead of the March 15 primary.

Runoff Elections Set

May 18, 2012

The races are set for primary runoff elections in two months.

Gurnal Scott: Several Council of State races, congressional contests and state legislative elections will take place in this 2nd primary set for July 17. Gary Bartlett of the State Board of Elections says he hasn't seen more than an eight-percent turnout for a runoff during his tenure. Bartlett adds the low turnout saves the state some money when it re-opens the polls

If you have a questions about today's primary ballot, there is a number to call for assistance.

Voters will go to the polls tomorrow with a lot of decisions to make. Local and statewide nominees will be determined, as will a constitutional amendment that would ban same-sex marriages and civil unions. Local elections boards have seen a unique set of circumstances in preparing for election day.

North Carolina's early voting period comes to an end today.

Gurnal Scott: Several key races and a controversial amendment question on marriage has kept voters coming out up to this last day to vote before Tuesday's primary. State board of Elections executive director Gary Bartlett says the last two weeks have had ebbs and flows.

Frank Palombo

Congressman Walter Jones has handily won North Carolina’s Third District since 1995.  Now it’s re-election time again and this may be his biggest fight yet.

Leoneda Inge:  For a while, Congressman Walter Jones had a nick-name on Capitol Hill.

Adam Kokesh:  Welcome back to Adam versus the Man. Joining us tonight is Congressman Walter “Freedom Fries,” formerly known as Walter “Freedom Fries” Jones.

Differing Views Of Amendment In Hickory Church

May 2, 2012
Reverend Doctor T. Anthony Spearman
John Biewen

North Carolina voters will decide on Tuesday whether to join thirty other states that have amended their constitutions to ban same-sex marriage. North Carolina law already defines marriage as between a man and a woman; the amendment would enshrine heterosexual marriage in the constitution, and ban civil unions. Those for and against the measure have focused their efforts on mobilizing people of faith. Reporter John Biewen followed the debate over gay marriage in an African American church in Hickory.

The top Republican candidates for State Auditor are seeking support in the final week before ballots are cast.

The Democratic candidates wanting to be the state's next Lieutenant Governor are working to show voters the differences between them.

Gurnal Scott: State Senator Eric Mansfield and State Personnel Director Linda Coleman still have a lot of work to do as they seek their party's nomination. Public Policy Polling last week showed more than half of likely Democratic voters surveyed have not made up their minds. Coleman says she thinks their choice should be easy.

The debate over a proposed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage and civil unions includes its potential economic impact.

With the May 8th vote less than two weeks away, the battle over a proposed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage and civil unions is heating up. For our series examining the arguments over the amendment, Isaac-Davy Aronson looks at one of the claims made by its opponents.

A proposed amendment to the state constitution banning gay marriage and civil unions has divided religious communities. For our series examining the arguments over the amendment, Isaac-Davy Aronson spoke to two North Carolina faith leaders.

Isaac-Davy Aronson: Michael Curry is the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. He opposes the amendment.

Michael Curry: This is coming out of my faith, as a Christian, as an Episcopal bishop, as an African American man, you don't do harm to people.

Walter Dalton

Earlier this week we profiled two Democratic candidates for governor: former U.S. Congressman Bob Etheridge and State House Representative Bill Faison. Today, in the final installment of our series covering the main Democratic candidates, we’ll hear from Lieutenant Governor Walter Dalton. He’s from the western town of Rutherfordton, where he was raised by his widowed mother.

Five candidates are running for the Republican nomination for State Superintendent. Dave DeWitt reports that the race will come down to the last days.

Dave DeWitt: The five candidates suffer from a bad case of poor name recognition. Richard Alexander, Mark Crawford, Ray Earnest Martin, John Tedesco and David Scholl are not well-known statewide.

A proposed amendment to the North Carolina constitution would define marriage between one man and one woman as the only valid or recognized domestic legal union in the state. Opponents of the amendment claim its wording would put certain protections and benefits at risk for all unmarried couples and their children. Among them: child custody and visitation rights.

Bob Etheridge

There are three main Democratic candidates in the race to become North Carolina’s governor. Yesterday we heard from State House Representative Bill Faison, who says his priority is jobs. But the subject of today’s story is focused on education. Bob Etheridge is a former U.S. Congressman who also served as the state’s Superintendent of Public Instruction for seven years.

Jessica Jones: Bob Etheridge was born at home in Turkey, North Carolina, as the first of five children. He says neither his mother nor his father finished high school.

Opponents of a proposed amendment to the state constitution banning same-sex marriage and civil unions say the measure is written too broadly. Among the effects they claim it could have is the invalidation of domestic violence protections for unmarried couples. Amendment supporters call that a scare tactic.

Bill Faison

There are three main candidates vying to become the state’s Democratic nominee for governor. For the next three days, WUNC will profile each of those candidates seeking to hold the state’s highest office. Today we hear from Bill Faison, a state representative who’s a successful plaintiffs’ attorney.

North Carolina’s 13th congressional district is shaping up as one of the most contentious races on the May 8 primary ballot. Two of the candidates, Paul Coble and George Holding, are fighting over who is more conservative.

Dave DeWitt: Paul Coble is no stranger to running for elected office. The one-term mayor of Raleigh and current chair of the Wake County Board of Commissioners has run nine times. He says his experience should count.

A final debate between the leading Democrats seeking to become Governor was held last night. Gurnal Scott reports a question about the marriage amendment on the ballot gave voters a clearer picture of where they stand on this divisive issue.

Paul Coble and George Holding are waging a fierce battle for the Republican nod in the 13th Congressional District. The District extends from North Raleigh through the rural counties north of the Triangle. It was re-drawn by the State Legislature and went from a safe Democratic seat to one that is likely to become Republican. The two men leading the race for the seat are very similar.

Dave DeWitt: Coble and Holding are so alike, in fact, they even share the exact same three political heroes.

The three top Democrats in the race for Governor squared off again last night. UNC TV hosted the second of three nights of debates. Gurnal Scott reports on the issue that two of the candidates hoped would separate them from the third.

Official Amendment Language And Explanation

Apr 17, 2012

Official language and explanation of the proposed amendment to the North Carolina Constitution from the State Board of Elections:

The 2011 General Assembly approved a measure (Session Law 2011-409) that would put language into the North Carolina Constitution related to legally recognized marriages in the state.

The proposed amendment to Article 14 of the North Carolina Constitution would add a new section, to be called Section 6. It would read as follows:

The Democratic frontrunners for Governor are working to distinguish themselves from one another before early voting begins later this week. Gurnal Scott looks at one issue where these men stood apart in last night's debate.

Yesterday we heard from a volunteer who belongs to the main advocacy group working to pass a constitutional amendment barring gay marriage and civil unions on the May 8th ballot. Yesterday’s profile focused on one man’s belief that the state constitution should follow the Bible when it comes to same-sex marriage. Today’s profile features a middle-aged mother of two who says she opposes the measure because she understands how discrimination feels.