The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook or Tumblr.

Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

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The State of Things
12:34 pm
Wed April 20, 2011

The State Of Water

Book cover, ''The Big Thirst''

Fishman joins host Frank Stasio to discuss what he believes to be the beginning of a worldwide water revolution.

North Carolinians are no strangers to drought but there are many other factors that lead to water insecurity. Water pollution, contamination, rainfall levels and population growth all dictate the amount of water that is available to a community. Charles Fishman, author of the new book, “The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water” (Free Press/2011), says we should be prepared for the day when water will no longer be inclusively cheap, clean and plentiful.

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The State of Things
11:58 am
Tue April 19, 2011

Death Penalty Data

Robinson joins host Frank Stasio to share more information about his report and talk about how this data could affect policymakers’ ideas about the death penalty.

North Carolina halted executions about five years  ago. Capital punishment is still legal in the state, but a dispute over the lethal injection process led to a de facto moratorium on the death penalty. Since then, the state’s murder rate has fallen, and investigations of the State Bureau of Investigation’s crime lab have
exposed mishandling of evidence in criminal cases. Matthew Robinson, a professor of government and justice studies at Appalachian State University, has been researching those facts and other data about the death penalty in North Carolina. His findings reveal that capital punishment is more costly than life imprisonment and that race and gender frequently factor into death penalty sentencing.

The State of Things
11:53 am
Tue April 19, 2011

30 Americans

Soundsuit
Credit www.ncartmuseum.org

Host Frank Stasio discusses the exhibit with his guests.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being labeled an “African-American artist”? That question is at the heart of a new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Art. It features the works of 31 contemporary artists - photography, video, sculpture and more – with each piece revealing a bit about the experience of blacks in America.

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The State of Things
11:36 am
Tue April 19, 2011

Ten Miles Past Normal

Ten Miles Past Normal

Host Frank Stasio talks with young adult novelist France O'Roark Dowell about the struggle of fitting in as a teenager.

Durham writer Frances O'Roark Dowell tackles the awkwardness of high school in her new young adult novel "Ten Miles Past Normal" (Atheneum/2011). The main character is Janie, a ninth-grader who once thought living on a farm would be great. She proposed the idea to her parents when she was in elementary school, and they embraced it. Now she is an outcast who sometimes goes to school with hay in her hair or goat droppings on her shoes.

The State of Things
11:06 am
Mon April 18, 2011

Meet Donald Davis

Donald Davis
Credit www.blairpub.com

Davis joins host Frank Stasio to discuss how ministering and storytelling go together and what it's like to grow up in the mountains and retire by the sea.

Donald Davis was born and raised in Waynesville, North Carolina. His people go back in Haywood County to the 1700s on both sides. He left home to attend Davidson College and Duke Divinity School. He was a Methodist minister for years before retiring to become a full time storyteller. He now lives on Ocracoke Island and spends most of the year traveling the country visiting festivals and leading workshops in the fine art of oral communication. Davis has committed some of his stories to paper in the new book, "Tales From a Free-Range Childhood" (John F. Blair/2011).

The State of Things
12:39 pm
Fri April 15, 2011

Mount Moriah

Mount Moriah

McEntire, Miller and Will Hackney join host Frank Stasio to perform live and talk about how love, family and Christianity all play influential roles in their music.

Mount Moriah is a Southern folk music band based in Durham, North Carolina. Their self-titled debut CD has rich lyrics that tackle themes such as reconciliation, religious symbolism and gender identity.

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The State of Things
11:51 am
Fri April 15, 2011

Staying Blue

Gibbons Ruark - Staying Blue

In honor of National Poetry Month, Ruark joins host Frank Stasio to read a selection of poems and talk about why he chose to retire in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Raleigh-based poet Gibbons Ruark grew up the son of a United Methodist minister, moving from town to town in eastern North Carolina. He graduated from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and received his master's degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He taught at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro before settling into a position at the University of Delaware for 37 years, but he never stopped writing about his North Carolina home. His work immortalizes hybrid magnolias and sun lit porches. Ruark is the award-winning author of eight books of poetry, including the most recent, "Staying Blue" (Lost Hill Books/2008).

The State of Things
11:33 am
Fri April 15, 2011

In His Own Voice

Simon Estes

Simon Estes was part of the first generation of African-Americans to break into opera. He's performed for numerous presidents and prominent religious figures, and he's worked with every major international opera company there is. Estes is the guest speaker this Saturday at World Voice Day, sponsored by the Duke Voice Care Center.

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The State of Things
12:35 pm
Thu April 14, 2011

The Witches Of Lublin

The Witches of Lublin

The audio play "The Witches of Lublin" transports listeners to 18th century Poland. Rivke is the matriarch of a family of female klezmer musicians who get themselves into trouble when the local nobleman, Count Sobieski, demands they play at his son's name day celebration. Klezmer music is traditionally male dominated, and Rivke knows that the Jews of Lublin will consider it a scandal if she plays for the Count. But denying him could have serious consequences. Host Frank Stasio will talk about the radio drama and how it tackles topics like anti-Semitism and misogyny with Sue Zizza, co-producer and director of "The Witches of Lublin"; playwright Ellen Kushner; and playwright and composer Yale Strom.

Host Frank Stasio will talk about the radio drama and how it tackles topics like anti-Semitism and misogyny with Sue Zizza, Ellen Kushner, and composer Yale Strom.

The State of Things
12:21 pm
Thu April 14, 2011

Sir Walter Raleigh, Life And Legend

Sir Walter Raleigh: Life and Legend

Host Frank Stasio talks about this explorer, historian, poet, courtier and self-made man with Mark Nicholls.

Sir Walter Raleigh never hoisted the English flag on the coast of North Carolina. He did not throw his cloak across a puddle for Queen Elizabeth I. And though he liked to smoke, he did not introduce either tobacco or potatoes to Europe from the New World. Though history has misconstrued much of the story of Sir Walter Raleigh, for whom North Carolina's capital is named, he was a compelling character nonetheless. Host Frank Stasio talks about this explorer, historian, poet, courtier and self-made man with Mark Nicholls, co-author of “Sir Walter Raleigh: Life and Legend" (Continuum International Publishing Group/2011).

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