The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook or Tumblr.

Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

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The State of Things
12:07 pm
Thu April 28, 2011

Art's New Place

Raleigh Contemporary Art Museum

Host Frank Stasio talks about the CAM's past and its hopes for the future.

Raleigh will get a little bit hipper this weekend when the Contemporary Art Museum - CAM Raleigh - opens in the downtown warehouse district. The organization behind the museum has been around for a couple of decades, but their new building marks a new era.

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The State of Things
11:58 am
Thu April 28, 2011

Hurricane Prediction

Hurricane Ivan

Scientists are predicting up to 16 major storms this hurricane season. But what happens once a hurricane does develop is much more difficult for scientists to predict. Gary M. Lackmann, a professor in the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University has found a way to calculate the severity of a hurricane using a sophisticated forecast system that gives more details about the eye of the storm.

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The State of Things
12:16 pm
Wed April 27, 2011

North Carolina’s Nuclear Near Miss

Now a retired newspaper editor, Rouse joins host Frank Stasio with his memories from the night of the crash.

Just after midnight on a winter’s day in 1961, an Air Force plane crashed in Faro, North Carolina. Aboard the B-52 were eight military crewmembers and two nuclear weapons, which fell to the ground from thousands of feet in the air. Fortunately, the weapons caused no damage, but some of the nuclear remnants remain buried in the town of Faro, just outside Goldsboro. Michael Rouse was a young reporter for the Goldsboro News-Argus in 1961.

The State of Things
12:03 pm
Wed April 27, 2011

The Future Of Nuclear

Host Frank Stasio examines the role that nuclear energy will play in powering the future.

Twenty-five years after the devastating nuclear accident at Chernobyl, the world’s attention is again focused on nuclear energy and the risks associated with nuclear technology. The massive damage to Japan’s Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant is contributing to growing fears over the safety of such facilities. But are those fears misplaced? How safe is nuclear power? Experts remain divided over the risks and benefits.

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The State of Things
12:59 pm
Tue April 26, 2011

Two Tar Heel Retirements

Woody Durham

Host Frank Stasio talks with Dave DeWitt, WUNC’s Raleigh Bureau Chief and education reporter, about these two men and the posts they are leaving.

This morning, longtime Raleigh mayor Charles Meeker announced that he will not be running for re-election. Meeker’s retirement could signal the start of a new political era for North Carolina’s rapidly-growing capital city. In other retirement news, Woody Durham, “The Voice of the Tar Heels,” stepped down as Carolina’s play-by-play announcer after 40 years of calling UNC’s football and basketball games.

The State of Things
12:49 pm
Tue April 26, 2011

Mental Health Disorder

Host Frank Stasio will talk about housing for the mentally ill.

Mentally ill residents in North Carolina don't have a lot of housing options if they can't make it on their own. There is a good chance they will end up in an adult care home. These facilities are usually reserved for the elderly, and they don’t offer mentally ill residents much in the way of services or rehabilitation. The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating North Carolina to see if its reliance on adult care homes violates the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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The State of Things
12:42 pm
Tue April 26, 2011

The Year of Magical Thinking

When Joan Didion suddenly lost her husband in 2003, she chronicled the experience in her memoir "The Year of Magical Thinking." Before the book was even published, her daughter, Quintana, died. In Didion's adapted play, "The Year of Magcial Thinking," she takes the audience on a journey through her sometimes surreal grieving process. Chapel Hill’s PlayMakers Repertory Company is staging the production from April 27th -May 1st.

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The State of Things
11:36 am
Mon April 25, 2011

Meet Lou Lipsitz

Lou Lipsitz
Credit www.loulipsitz.com

Lipsitz joins host Frank Stasio for National Poetry Month to talk about the connection between poetry and therapy.

Lou Lipsitz spent 30 years as a professor of political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and several more as a psychotherapist. Lipsitz is also a poet, often combining the art of teaching and counseling with his writing. His new collection of poems is called “if this world falls apart” (Lynx House Press/2011).

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The State of Things
1:40 pm
Fri April 22, 2011

Remembering Chris Hondros

Chris Hondros
Credit www.chrishondros.com

Host Frank Stasio will talk with Amber Nimocks and JD Pooley, two friends and former colleagues of Hondros’.

Photojournalist Chris Hondros was killed in Libya on Wednesday along with Tim Hetherington, the Oscar-nominated director of the war documentary "Restrepo." Hondros grew up in Fayetteville, graduated from North Carolina State University and worked for a time at the Fayetteville Observer. After Hondros left North Carolina, he became an acclaimed war photographer, winning numerous awards and becoming a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2004.

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The State of Things
1:36 pm
Fri April 22, 2011

The Watery Part Of The World

Book cover, ''The Watery Part of the World''

Parker joins host Frank Stasio to talk about creating a work of historical fiction and why island folk are the best secret keepers.

Aaron Burr, Vice President for Thomas Jefferson’s cabinet, fathered only one child that survived past infancy. Her name was Theodosia Burr Alston, a well-educated and accomplished woman who was highly respected in her time. In the winter of 1812, Theodosia mysteriously disappeared on a ship voyage from South Carolina to New York.

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