The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook or Tumblr.

Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

Composer ID: 
5187f7dce1c872f9d0bc2b95|5187f7d9e1c872f9d0bc2b8e

Pages

The State of Things
11:34 am
Mon June 20, 2011

Meet The Civil War Battlefield

Bennett Place
Credit www.nchistoricsites.org/bennett/

The Civil War was one of the bloodiest wars fought in American history. Although the North won, led bravely by President Abraham Lincoln, Union victory was never a foregone conclusion. Historian Joseph Glatthaar says Lincoln may have been a great political leader, but he didn’t know much about military strategy. The president’s missteps made the Civil War longer and almost caused the resignation of one of the Union’s great generals.

Read more
The State of Things
10:00 am
Fri June 17, 2011

Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter

Book cover, ''Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter''

Host Frank Stasio talks with Tom Franklin about his newest book.

Author Tom Franklin made his name with a collection of short stories called “Poaches.” His latest novel is a murder mystery that mines his Southern boyhood for material. Not only does “Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter” (Harper Perennial/2011) keep the reader enraptured with its well-paced crime story, it also explores truths about race relations and friendship in the modern, rural South.

The State of Things
10:00 am
Fri June 17, 2011

The Winton Triangle

Credit www.chowandiscovery.org

As part of WUNC’s series ''North Carolina Voices: The Civil War,'' Winton Triangle historian Marvin Jones, a photographer and the Executive Director of the Chowan Discovery Group, joins host Frank Stasio with the story of this unique North Carolina community.

More Americans marked at least two boxes for “race” on the 2010 Census than ever before. The country may not be increasingly multiracial but it certainly is increasingly conscious of its multiracial identity. In Northeastern North Carolina there is a community that is historically mixed race. Landowning free people of color have lived together in The Winton Triangle for 260 years. Their ancestors include people who moved from the Chesapeake Bay area as well as Chowanoke, Meherrin, and Tuscarora Indians, Africans and East Indians.

The State of Things
10:00 am
Fri June 17, 2011

Spirit Family Reunion

Spirit Family Reunion is a Brooklyn-based band with a Southern soul and a rowdy, toe-tapping repertoire. Their music is a blend of front-porch Americana, old-time gospel and bluegrass. They sing about redemption, salvation and celebration.

Read more
The State of Things
12:42 pm
Thu June 16, 2011

The Homefront is the Battlefront

Movie still from the film, ''Gone with the Wind''

Thavolia Glymph and Laura Edwards join host Frank Stasio

The Civil War is often referred to as the last war fought on American soil. Since then, we fight wars over seas and we watch the battles play out on TV or the Internet. For black and white women living in the American South, the Civil War was fought all around them, but the true enemies were poverty, hunger and despair. For those women, the battlefront was not a distant idea because the battlefront was the homefront. As part of our series, “North Carolina Voices: The Civil War,” Thavolia Glymph and Laura Edwards join host Frank Stasio to discuss what life was like for women in North Carolina during the war.

Read more
The State of Things
12:38 pm
Thu June 16, 2011

North Carolina Quakers During The Civil War

Did you know that Quakers were the first organized non-native religious group in the Carolinas? In the late 1600s, the governor and assembly of North Carolina were majority Quaker. Today, the Piedmont Triad has the largest concentration of Quakers in North America. But leading up to the Civil War, Quakers left the state in droves because of their opposition to slavery. During the war, their pacifism sent them north and west to free states. Greensboro’s Guilford College was first established as a boarding school in 1837 in order to maintain some Quaker presence in the state.

Read more
The State of Things
11:44 am
Wed June 15, 2011

State's Rights and the Reconstruction Amendments

Michael Gerhardt
Credit law.unc.edu

The 14th Amendment may be the most hotly debated 2,000 words in American history. It was adopted on July 9, 1868 and is considered the most important of the “Reconstruction Amendments.” Those amendments - the 13th, 14th and 15th - reconfigure the relationship between the states and the federal government. Among other things, they put the federal government in the position of monitoring the way states protect civil rights.

Read more
The State of Things
11:24 am
Wed June 15, 2011

Beauty Pageants

Credit missnc.org

The Miss North Carolina beauty pageant begins this Tuesday. The winner of that will compete in the illustrious Miss America beauty pageant. Both contests are influential, doing much to perpetuate a certain image of female beauty. But is that image of beauty harmful?

Read more
The State of Things
11:58 am
Tue June 14, 2011

Moonshine

Charlie Thompson

Host Frank Stasio talks about the history of moonshine with Charlie Thompson and Dan Pierce.

Charlie Thompson wanted to learn more about his grandfather’s history in moonshine, so began investigating his hometown and the “Moonshine Capital of the World,” Franklin County, Virginia. What he found was a complicated picture of poverty and necessity juxtaposed with a hierarchy of power that was revealed during a famous conspiracy trial in 1935.

Read more
The State of Things
11:35 am
Tue June 14, 2011

Black Soldiers In The Civil War

Visualize a Civil War soldier and a sepia colored picture of a white man likely comes to mind. But thousands of African Americans in North Carolina served in the Union Army during the Civil War. They trained in the town of New Bern after its fall in March 1962.

Read more

Pages