The State of Things

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We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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Get a daily show update, and special news.

Image of sticky notes with one titled find job
www.flazingo.com / Flickr Creative Commons

New economic numbers out this month show workers in the Triangle are finding fewer jobs, and those who do have employment are making less money. 

The latest unemployment figures are the highest the Triangle has seen since August of last year. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Triangle Business Journal reporter Jason deBruyn about the latest figures. 

Profile photo of Mark Dreibelbis from the NCHSAA.
www.nchsaa.org/ / www.nchsaa.org/

For Mark Dreibelbis, not much is more exciting than the world of high school sports. From the fans to the rules, he loves every minute. As an associate commissioner with the North Carolina High School Athletic Association, Dreibelbis serves on national committees that have adopted a host of new rules in recent years aimed at keeping student athletes safe.

What Is A Terrorist?

Jul 2, 2015
Image of terrorism definition
Jagz Mario / Flickr Creative Commons
Image of Damon Tweedy, who is a professor psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke.
Stock Photography

When Damon Tweedy was in his first year of medical school, he learned a number of startling statistics that led him to the conclusion that being black is somehow bad for your health.

He heard over and over how black patients were faring worse than other patients in almost every field of medicine, but nobody seemed to be talking about the reasons for this disparity.

An image of a jail cell
AlexVan / pixabay Creative Commons

Two suicides of inmates in the Jackson County jail during a four-month period prompted investigations by the State Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Both men died of hanging and the investigations found that both deaths occurred when jailers failed to conduct visual checks required by state rules. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Asheville Citizen-Times investigative reporter Tonya Maxwell about the cases. 

Image of Peach Pico de Gallo from Sandra Gutierrez's book 'The New Southern-Latino Table'
Sandra Gutierrez

The first community cookbook was published by Maria J. Moss in 1864 to raise funds for Union soldiers injured during the Civil War. Over the following centuries, thousands of other communities followed in her footsteps and used cookbooks as a way to raise money, share a particular message, and communicate peer-to-peer with others in their community.

Image of a sweat bee on button snakeroot
Barbara Driscoll

Bees are vital to the American food system. Honey bees alone contribute more than $15 billion to the American economy through pollination of plants that produce fruits, nuts and vegetables.

red wolf
Dave DeWitt

The Red Wolf Recovery program in eastern North Carolina will continue – at least for now. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that the 27-year old program will require some changes and further review. The agency will not release new animals into the wild while it studies the program further.

About 50-75 wild red wolves currently roam a five-county area on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula.

The North Carolina legislative office building
Wikipedia

State lawmakers passed a temporary spending measure this week to keep North Carolina’s government running for 45 days.

The move allowed lawmakers to avoid the midnight deadline tonight that marks the end of the fiscal year. Legislators to continue to debate differences over tax structure, education spending and Medicaid. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol reporter Jorge Valencia about the latest. 

An image of the Supreme Court
Kjetil Ree / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court says housing discrimination does not have to be intentional to be illegal.

Last week's ruling in the case of Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project held that while the state did not intend to create racially discriminatory housing policies, the negative outcomes for minority communities in Dallas meant a violation of the Fair Housing Act.

The decision could affect the way states across the country assign affordable housing projects, including in North Carolina.

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