The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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The State of Things
12:31 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

UNC Board of Governors Close Academic Centers

Protesters disrupt UNC board debate about poverty center.
Credit https://twitter.com/adv_project

Over the protests of students, the UNC Board of Governors moved forward with tuition and fee increases, as well as the controversial decision to close three academic centers in UNC system.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with WUNC reporter Dave Dewitt about the decisions and the outcries from faculty and students about the Center on Poverty, Work, and Opportunity at UNC Chapel Hill; the Center for Biodiversity at East Carolina; and the Institute for Civic Engagement and Social Change at North Carolina Central.

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The State of Things
12:15 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

A Lifetime Of Diplomacy: Ambassador Thomas Pickering

Ambassador Thomas Pickering
Credit Wikipedia

  

Ambassador Thomas Pickering began his career in the foreign service more than 40 years ago. He has served as ambassador to many countries including Jordan, El Salvador, Israel, Nigeria, India and the Russian Federation.

He served as the United States ambassador to the United Nations and as undersecretary of state for political affairs at the State Department. Recently, Ambassador Pickering led the department panel’s investigation into the 2012 attack in Benghazi.

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The State of Things
12:05 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

From Nest To Sea And Back Again

Credit US Fish and Wildlife Service

  

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill may have proof that sea turtles use the magnetic field of the earth to find their way back to their nesting places after traveling hundreds of miles at sea during adulthood.

Scientists have long suspected sea turtles use their sensitivity to magnetism to locate their hatching sites, but tracking them over long distances and time spans made the theory difficult to prove.

Host Frank Stasio talks with J. Roger Brothers, PhD candidate at UNC-Chapel Hill and lead author of the latest study on sea turtle navigation.

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The State of Things
12:03 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

How Love Might Fix The Criminal Justice System

Credit Carolina Academic Press

  

The U.S. justice system is meant to protect Americans from wrongdoing and hold accountable those who would harm others.

But advocates for reform point to incidents like the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner as just a few examples of a broken system.

Peacemaking criminologist Michael DeValve says love can rebuild it, arguing that where equality fails, empathy and compassion can succeed.

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The State of Things
12:01 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

The Return Of Six String Drag

From left to right: Kenny Roby, Ray Duffey, Rob Keller, Dave Wright and Luis Rodriguez
Credit Michael Traister / Six String Drag

North Carolina musician Kenny Roby teamed up with his friend and bass player Rob Keller in the early 1990s to create a roots band called Six String Drag.

The alternative country-soul-rock music thrust Kenny, Rob and the rest of the band into their own careers, but now they are back together, and they have created their first album in 18 years, called Roots Rock 'N' Roll.

They returned to their eclectic style with a few images of the 1950s and 1960s thrown in, including a song called "I Miss the Drive-in."

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The State of Things
12:10 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Cheating For College Athletes From The Outside

Credit Alberto G. / flickr

    

College athletics programs are under a lot of pressure to make money for their schools. That means, among other things, keeping players academically eligible.

The scandal at UNC-Chapel Hill is one example. An investigator there found that over the course of 18 years, nearly 3,000 students took classes that did not require them to show up. About half were student athletes, and the report pointed the blame at a few administrators.

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Arts & Culture
12:03 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Downton Abbey At The Biltmore

Costume expert Nancy Lawson tweaking the mannequins before the exhibit's opening.
The Biltmore Company

Biltmore House is bringing Downton Abbey to Asheville with a new exhibit featuring more than 40 original costumes from the show.

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The State of Things
12:01 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

An Ever-Evolving City

Sarita and her family arrived from Nepal in 2008, where they had lived in a refugee camp for many years after fleeing political instability in Bhutan.
Andrea Patiño Contreras

The economy can have a major influence on the history of a city.

Factories once brought folks from the world over to new places with a similar goals in mind - to prosper and make a better life. That is the story of Lynn, Massachusetts. Once the home of General Electric and the countless shoe factories, the city was home to immigrants from Canada, Ireland, Greece, Italy and Armenia. Now, Lynn bears only the vestiges of its industrial success and is economically depressed. Immigration continues but from new areas of the world.

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The State of Things
12:02 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Bringing Back Radio Haiti, A Station That Told The Overlooked Stories

Some of the tapes from the Radio Haiti archive now housed at Duke University's Rubenstein Library.
Laura Wagner/ The Radio Haiti Archive

Radio Haiti was the first independent Haitian radio station and the first public media platform to broadcast largely in Creole.  

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The State of Things
12:00 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Turning An Old Idea Into A New Phenomenon

The participants in ARAPDIS find mental health therapy in the garden, sharing and observing the daily green delights.
Photo by Barcelona-based photographer Violeta de Lama, courtesy of Wil Weldon.

More and more people around the world are choosing to get their hands dirty—digging in the dirt in their backyard or at a community garden to plant produce.

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