The State of Things

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We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

 Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

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Combat veterans often struggle at the end of life with feelings of guilt, abandonment and regret. For some dying service members and their families, a military hospital is a place where they can make those last days meaningful.

Host Frank Stasio talks with KUOW reporter Patricia Murphy about end of life care for our nation’s soldiers.

University of South Carolina Press

In his 13 years at the Raleigh News and Observer, J. Peder Zane says he tried to perfect the art of the newspaper column. 

Zane came to North Carolina in 1996 to be the paper's book review editor after years as a reporter for the New York Times. His journalism experience informed the way he would tackle his own commentary: by connecting today's newsmakers to the complex characters in American literature.

Jon Stickley Trio
Jon Stickley Trio

Durham native Jon Stickley has jumped around from Indy rock bands to renowned bluegrass groups like Big Fat Gap and Town Mountain.

But he's found another musical home in Asheville with his newest creation, the Jon Stickley Trio. 

Jon has combined his experience with rock, bluegrass and Americana with two other talented musicians who have classical and hip-hop backgrounds.

In many cities, the crumbling housing projects that once housed the nation's poorest families are being replaced by mixed- income housing developments.

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development has made mixed-income housing the preferred model for providing affordable housing. The concept is to deconcentrate individuals who earn lower incomes and to assist those families in maintaining a residence in a community that serves various income levels. A recent study examines the effects of low-income children living alongside more affluent neighbors.

Image of Cliff Collins, owner of Cliff's Meat Market
D.L. Anderson

Cliff’s Meat Market has been a cornerstone of the food industry in the Triangle for more than four decades. Cliff Collins started the shop when he was in his 20s, and it’s now one of the last family-owned markets in the area. Many have noted that the key to Cliff’s success is his ability to evolve alongside the community he serves and create products to meet their needs.

Jim Grimsley was an 11-year-old boy growing up in Jones County, North Carolina, when the first black children enrolled in his all-white school.

It was more than 10 years after Brown v. Board of Education and Grimsley’s whole world was about to change. Grimsley gets into this in his new memoir, in which he describes the racist environment in which he was raised and how he began to rethink his assumptions.

Wells
wikimedia

  A superior court judge in Wake County today halted fracking in the state. The court order prohibits the Mining and Energy Commission from accepting or processing fracking permits. The decision is a temporary legal victory for environmental groups across the state.Meanwhile, at the legislature, House representatives are preparing to debate a $22.2 billion spending plan. The initial proposal includes more money for teachers, state employees and incentives. Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC reporters Dave Dewitt and Jeff Tiberii about the latest.

Book cover to Ronald Manheimer new book 'Mirrors of the Mind.'
Jorvik Press/2015

Many think of philosophers like Nietzsche, Kierkegaard and Augustine as confined to dusty old anthologies and philosophy survey courses.

But retired philosophy professor Ronald Manheimer wanted to change that perspective and take readers out of philosophers' heads and into their lives. His new book, "Mirrors of the Mind: Reflecting on Philosophers' Autobiographies" (Jorvik Press/2015) delves into the lives of some of the most well-known philosophers.

    

Host Frank Stasio talks with Manheimer about how these great thinkers' lives informed their theories.

Image of Katharine Wright sitting beside Wilbur before her first flight in 1909.
Courtesy of Special Collections and Archives, Wright State University

The state of North Carolina has many claims to fame, but there is likely none more popular or controversial than the slogan on the state license plate: “First In Flight.” The phrase commemorates the spectacular achievement of brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright who piloted their first flight in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in 1903.

    

Medicaid reform is at the forefront of the state's legislative agenda this session, but legislators are still debating how to design the reform. 

The Senate wants to privatize administration and let commercial insurance companies control the market while the House and Governor McCrory want state health care providers to be in charge. A new report from Wake Forest University argues for a hybrid strategy.

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