Marketplace

M-F 6:30 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

The NRA hasn’t always been the NRA

Feb 15, 2018

The National Rifle Association spent about $5 million lobbying Congress last year. That's up from around $1.5 million 10 years ago, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.  But the NRA is not just a Washington lobbying powerhouse. Its reach extends across the country.  

Click the audio player above for the full story. 

Inflation pressure evident at producer level

Feb 15, 2018

The producer price index for January rose 0.4 percent month-to-month, and 2.7 percent year-to-year. Core producer prices, excluding volatile food and energy prices, were up 2.2 percent year-to-year. Producer prices remained muted after the Great Recession as economic growth was sluggish, but upward price pressure appears to be building at both the wholesale and retail levels now, as the labor market approaches full employment and economic activity ramps up, creating supply and labor bottlenecks.

Google begins blocking "annoying" ads on Chrome

Feb 15, 2018

Google earns roughly 90 percent of its income from showing you ads online, so it might seem counterintuitive that the company’s Chrome browser will now automatically hide all ads on websites that use certain annoying and intrusive kinds of advertising.

Racial discrimination in the home loan industry used to be explicit and legal: Redlining indicated neighborhoods where African-Americans and other people of color lived, and encouraged banks not to lend there. Now it looks a bit different.

More U.S. cities are talking about opening supervised places for addicts to inject their drugs, including San Francisco, with a target opening date of this summer.

What's that saying? You can't manage it if you don't measure it? Everybody's got their own answer about how to stop mass shootings, but nobody has substantive data. That's because there's effectively a ban on spending federal money for research on gun violence. Then: We know the National Rifle Association spends big on lobbying, but thinking of the NRA as just a Washington powerhouse lobbyist obscures its actual impact in this economy. Plus, what you need to know about Google's new ad blocker.

(Markets Edition) Amid all the hubbub about the Consumer Price Index's inflation figures yesterday, retail sales were looking a little low. Diane Swonk, chief economist at accounting firm Grant Thornton, joined us to explain why and what tax refund delays may have to do with it. Afterwards, we'll talk to Stephan Richter — editor in chief of the publication The Globalist — about the cheap costs of living in Germany. 

Even for cryptocurrency traders, the taxman cometh

Feb 15, 2018

As more people invest in cryptocurrency, will they report gains or losses to the IRS? One tax preparer says only a fraction of tax filers have reported cryptocurrency investments so far. How much money could the IRS be missing out on? And what should cryptocurrency traders be aware of when it comes to possible tax consequences?  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

02/15/2018: The tax-dodging device known as bitcoin

Feb 15, 2018

(U.S. Edition) Cyril Ramaphosa will take power as South Africa's president after Jacob Zuma stepped down amid corruption allegations. On today's show, we'll look at Ramaphosa's political experience, along with the type of economy Ramaphosa will inherit. Afterwards, we'll discuss how people who own cryptocurrencies aren't disclosing their gains on their tax returns.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After months of pressure to resign, embattled South African president Jacob Zuma will leave office today. We’ll tell you what’s next for the nation and how its new leader will try to revive the battered economy.  Then, Iranian authorities have arrested nearly 100 currency traders and shut foreign exchange bureaus – all aimed at trying to stop the Rial falling in value amid concerns the nuclear deal with the U.S. could collapse. Afterwards, custom-tailored clothing is nice to have, but can hit your wallet hard.

Someone probably owns most of the things you say

Feb 15, 2018

Many™ of™ the™ words™ you™ say™ are™ probably™ trademarked.™

And this is causing a lot of problems for people who are trying to start businesses.  

Google Chrome’s built-in ad blocker is set to start blocking some of the most annoying ads — pop ups, automatic players and the like. But while ads can be irritating, ad-tracking software might actually be worse. To get a closer look at this kind of tracking and why it should matter to consumers, Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood speaks with Casey Oppenheim, co-founder and CEO of the privacy software company Disconnect. 

Netflix brings award-winning producer on board

Feb 14, 2018

Netflix has made a deal to bring prolific producer Ryan Murphy into the fold to create a bunch of binge-able series and movies. The five-year deal is reported to be worth $300 million. It's the streaming giant's latest move to book top-level talent. Less than a year ago, Netflix signed an estimated $100 million four-year deal with Shonda Rhimes. The company is clearly doubling down on original content.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Does data mean retailers are pulling back?

Feb 14, 2018

We got some number today hot off the keyboards of the folks at the Commerce Department. They show that retail spending in January was lower than December by 0.3 percent. That dip was notable because the consensus was actually that it would be slighter higher. A drop when you’re expecting an increase, that turned some heads.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Why the pace of Muslim women entering the workforce is accelerating

Feb 14, 2018

There’s a old saying that’s true for the politics of any given economy and economics writ large: demography is destiny. Who's in your workforce matters a whole lot, and across the Muslim world, that’s increasingly women. Saadia Zahidi is the head of Education, Gender and Work at the World Economic Forum. She talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about her new book, "Fifty Million Rising: The New Generation of Working Women Revolutionizing the Muslim World." The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

We hate days like this, when there's been a shooting in a school or at a concert. There's no economic angle right after a tragedy like this. It's not our story, but we can't ignore it. So we're gonna acknowledge it, trust that you've had your fill of it elsewhere and turn to our news of the day. It came this morning with a much-anticipated but kind of underwhelming report on inflation. It's up a bit, but nowhere near as drastic as we'd all expected it to be. Nevertheless, it's one more data point for policymakers to consider as they figure out how to steer this economy.

For Dallas Fed president, sustaining long-term growth will take more than tax cuts

Feb 14, 2018

The Consumer Price Index rose 0.5 percent in January, a bit ahead of market expectations. While it's easy to read a lot into a single data point, this is just one of the figures that policymakers use as they decide how to steer the economy. Robert Kaplan, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, is one of those policymakers. He sits on the Federal Open Market Committee, one of the bodies that helps the Federal Reserve set monetary policy. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal sat down with Kaplan to discuss the state of the economy.

Stitch Fix's CEO says there should be more seats at the table, not in investors' hot tubs

Feb 14, 2018

Tech, like a lot of other industries, is dominated by men. Women get $3 in venture capital for every $4 that men do, according to tech site Crunchbase. And only 17 percent  of startups had a woman as their founder in 2017. Katrina Lake, the founder and CEO of Stitch Fix, has experienced that sexism first hand. In 2017 she was the only female CEO to take a tech company public in the U.S.

A tax credit that has helped to revitalize historic buildings across the U.S. was almost eliminated during the recent tax overhaul. But advocates for the tax credit pointed out that every congressional district has at least one historic tax credit project. Nationwide, more than 1,000 projects took advantage of this credit in 2017.

02/14/2018: What next, Jay Powell?

Feb 14, 2018

(Markets Edition) It turns out inflation is running higher, based on new data from the Consumer Price Index. We'll talk to Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings Group, about whether we should worry about these figures and what we should expect from the Federal Reserve. Afterwards, we'll look at allegations that the VIX Index, a measure of the stock market's expectations of volatility, is rigged. 

Clothing and car insurance prices drive inflation

Feb 14, 2018

WASHINGTON — U.S. consumer prices, excluding the volatile food and energy categories, rose 0.3 percent last month. That was the biggest climb in a year and is likely to fan inflation fears in financial markets.

The Labor Department says overall consumer prices rose 0.5 percent in January, the most in four months. Inflation rose 2.1 percent from a year earlier and core prices increased 1.8 percent. The increases were led by much higher clothing costs and more expensive car insurance.

Here's how inflation works

Feb 14, 2018

Given that fears of higher interest rates driven by inflation have been one key factor in the turbulent markets this month, much attention is being paid to the release of the consumer price index just now. It's up by 0.5 percent, more than expected. The core rate, excluding volatile food and energy prices, is up 0.3 percent, the most in a year.  

02/14/2018: The employee is always right

Feb 14, 2018

(U.S. Edition) We'll get a reading on inflation today with the release of the Consumer Price Index, which looks at the prices on goods including food, gas and clothing. Let's dive into the causes of inflation and how it's affected the markets. Afterwards, we'll take a look at how Trump's infrastructure plans calls to boost workforce training programs, and then we'll chat with Brad Grossman — creator of the Zeitguide, a periodical that gives advice to C-suite leaders — about why employers are starting to put a greater emphasis on employee satisfaction.

The Trump administration’s new infrastructure plan promises a boost in workforce training programs — specifically, 1 million apprentices in two years. But some critics say there aren’t enough specifics in the proposals.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

You may or may not celebrate Valentine's Day, but it's still one of the busiest days — no, weeks — of the year for these CEOs and their companies. Jim McCann is the founder and CEO of 1-800-Flowers, and when he talked with us back in 2014, he called this week the company's "Super Bowl." Then: Tariq Farid may have started his career as a florist, but he came up with a new business idea when he decided to use fruit instead of flowers and went on to found and run Edible Arrangements. He talked with us back in 2015. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… Japan notched its eighth-straight quarter of growth – the longest such streak since the 1980s. Though it was a slower pace than earlier in 2016, we explain what’s propelling growth forward. Afterward, in the wake of Hollywood’s Harvey Weinstein scandal, the British film industry is setting out new guidelines to tackle sexual harassment and bullying in the UK entertainment industry. Then, French President Emmanuel Macron has pushed through key labor and corporate tax cuts.

What's keeping your CEO up at night

Feb 14, 2018

The customer employee must come first.

Major cultural and social changes are happening in the business sector, which includes a greater emphasis on employee satisfaction.

Tech, like a lot of other industries, is dominated by men. Women get $3 in venture capital for every $4 that men do, according to tech site Crunchbase. And only 17 percent of startups have a woman as their CEO. Katrina Lake, the founder and CEO of Stitch Fix, has experienced that sexism first hand. In 2017, she was the only female CEO to take a company public in the U.S.

An inquiry is being conducted after allegations that the aid group Oxfam covered up a sex scandal involving some of its senior staff. There's money on the line to be lost, but also the worrying matter for any charitable organization of lost public trust.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Getting Facebook out of controversy

Feb 13, 2018

It has been a rough couple years for Mark Zuckerberg and the company he owns. Facebook is at the uncomfortable center of the controversy over the 2016 election and how easily the company's news algorithms were duped by the Russians. And it is also being accused of spreading fake news on its site.

During the past two years, Zuckerberg has been trying to fix it all.

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