Marketplace

M-F 6:30 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

Marketplace for Thursday, August 27, 2015

4 hours ago

PODCAST: Happy birthday, now cut me a check

9 hours ago
David Brancaccio

First up: market's seem to be mellowing slightly, but that doesn't mean we're out of the volatile, volatile woods. We look at what that could mean for interest rates. Next, financial planners are telling people to stay the course and think about the long term, but what if you don't have that kind of time? Finally, you can sing the "Happy Birthday" song all you want but be careful about putting it in that screenplay you're working on. Believe it or not, the copyright is owned by Warner/Chappell Music, and they've been known to charge six figures for its use.

Marketplace Tech for Wednesday, August 27, 2015

15 hours ago
Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, August 27, 2015: On today's show,  gaming retailer GameStop reports earnings. The world's largest personal asset manager, BlackRock,  is turning to robots to give clients financial advise. Plus, a conversation with a security researcher in Australia who may change the way you think about the Ashley Madison data hack. 

Airing on Thursday, August 27, 2015: What recent market volatility means for the stewards of the Federal Reserve descending on Jackson Hole, Wyoming, this week  for their annual retreat. China cracks down on warehouse executives at the center of the Tianjin explosion. Plus, a conversation about urban planning in New Orleans and how the city's innovative approach to parking reduces congestion and creates more opportunities for local businesses. 

How volatile is the market? Let's consult the VIX

Aug 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

The Volatility Index (VIX) measures whether or not there’s too much fear or optimism in the markets. Robert Whaley, father of the VIX, says at the “beginning of the week it was about at a level of 12, at the end of the week it was at 28. That was the biggest percentage increase the VIX has ever had in its entire history.”

Currently, the VIX is around 34 percent. But what exactly does that mean? “It’s a measure of the volatility you expect over the next 30 days,” Whaley says. He adds that the VIX is usually around 20 percent.

No worries on China's streets

Aug 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal, Rob Schmitz and Hayley Hershman

The Yuan devaluation and China’s market crash has caused global chaos. But Rob Schmitz, Marketplace’s China correspondent in Shanghai, says people on the street in China really aren’t that worried. A Sichuan restaurant owner told Schmitz “that business is really good.”

“Most importantly [China’s] got a growing economy," Schmitz says. "We've seen the headlines this week about China’s market crash ... [but] China’s economy is continuing to grow at around 6 or 7 percent, faster than nearly every other economy in the world.”

No, the economy is not like a roller coaster

Aug 26, 2015
Sam Weiner

When the market goes wild, people say the economy is like a roller coaster. And, frankly, I am sick and tired of this disgusting comparison. Someone has got to stick up for the inventor of roller coasters, my grandfather, Dr. Johann T. Rollercoaster.

And yes, laugh at his name if you must. It was changed at Ellis Island from the original Rollercoasterstein.

How Nevada could cast a shadow over solar

Aug 26, 2015
Scott Tong

A big bet on solar energy may be about to go sour in Nevada. State regulators are considering a utility's proposal to charge owners of rooftop solar systems a monthly fee for being connected to the grid.

That kind of fee, called a demand charge, would take the savings out of solar for most homeowners, undermining the business model of solar companies. Utilities in several states are pressing for similar charges. One big solar installer, Vivint Solar, has already stopped doing business in Nevada because of the uncertainty.

Blame low wages on slack

Aug 26, 2015
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

A new report from the Congressional Budget Office is shedding some light on why wages aren’t going up, even as the unemployment rate goes down. 

Blame it on slack, the CBO says. That is, extra workers in the labor market — people who’ve given up looking for a job. 

These extra workers aren’t officially counted as unemployed because they’re not looking for work. They might be boomers who are pushed toward an unexpectedly early retirement. Or millennials who decide to stay home with the kids.

Marketplace for Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Aug 26, 2015

What we've learned about the market's safety nets; Apple's "Sinodependency"; and stopping the roller coaster metaphor in its tracks.

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