Marketplace

M-F 6:30 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

There might be a way to eliminate traffic jams

Aug 26, 2016
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David Lazarus and Crystal Castle

Next weekend for Labor Day, AAA estimates that 35 million Americans will travel. And about 86 percent are due to fill up their gas tanks for one final summer road trip. 

The company also estimates that it costs about 57 cents a mile to drive. But with so many people on the road, most of that fuel will be wasted idling in traffic. However, there is a glimmer of hope. Benjamin Seibold, a professor at Temple University who studies traffic, said jams can be mitigated simply by changing the way you drive. 

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Molly Wood

When it comes to TV screen resolution, apparently you can never have too many Ks.

Panasonic and Sony are teaming up to produce and sell 8K TVs by 2020. Those screens would essentially offer eight times the resolution of a standard high definition television set, so it seems like a good time for the return of my new segment: Tech Intervention.

You know what? You can have too many Ks. We're not going to need 8K TVs in 2020.

Americans are eating more cheese than ever

Aug 26, 2016
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Donna Tam

You might think it’s your American duty to buy a few extra blocks of cheddar this weekend, given the U.S. government's need to purchase surplus cheese in order to help the dairy industry. But rest assured. You have already played your part.

Americans are eating more cheese than ever — consuming over 34 pounds per capita in 2015 — and there’s no end in sight for our love with this dairy staple.

Supermarket price wars heating up

Aug 26, 2016
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Adam Allington

Competition is heating up between America's biggest grocery chains, and food prices are falling as a result. Discount retailer Dollar General said Thursday that it's cutting prices on hundreds of items across 2,000 stores.

The strategy follows a similar path set forth by other chains such as Wal-Mart, Kroger and Trader Joe's. Cutting costs to get people in the door is a time-tested strategy, but it could mean slimmer margins for both grocery stores and suppliers.

As it turns out, that could be a risky move.

Moving manufacturing jobs to Mexico isn't a bad thing

Aug 26, 2016
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David Lazarus and Crystal Castle

It isn't news that there has been a drop in manufacturing employment. 

In fact, those jobs have been in decline since the 1970s, and have dropped by 5 million since 2000. But what may come as a surprise is that the jobs that have left the United States and relocated south of the border have actually benefited workers in the United States. In order to produce commodities, Mexico needs to consume a chunk of good from the U.S. About 40 cents of every dollar that the United States imports from Mexico comes from the U.S.

This fall, TV networks go back in time

Aug 26, 2016
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Reema Khrais

Time travel seems to be a popular motif with broadcast networks these days. Three different shows about time shifting are coming to three different networks. There’s NBC’s "Timeless," Fox’s "Making History," and ABC’s "Time After Time."

But the characters aren’t the only ones trying to rewrite history. The television networks themselves are jumping into a kind of time machine.

This fall, along with their usual shows about doctors, lawyers and cops, the networks are also adapting movies and reviving old series.

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Amy Scott

Shayla Thacker had a rough start at the University of Minnesota. There were the usual freshman adjustments, like living away from home for the first time and a heavier workload.

“Then in the classes, there’s not too many students that kind of fit my profile,” she said.  

Thacker, now 22, is African-American and was raised by a single mother whose income fell below the poverty line. She’s also the first in her family to go to college.

“Just finding other students to relate to, it wasn't a natural process to connect with some of my peers,” she said.

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Marketplace Weekend Staff

As August winds down, it's time to go back to school. The United States spends $12,296 per public school student, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. That money helps take care of school operations and maintains school property.

For this week's conversation, we want to know about how you spend on education. Are you splurging on school stuff for your kids? Or maybe you're still paying off the degree you completed years ago? What have you learned?

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Ben Markus

Some people might see Sara Garton, a 74-year-old former copy editor, as a threat to Aspen’s affordable housing system. She’s lived in her one-bedroom condo in an affordable housing unit for 30 years and has no intention of moving out.

“We are in what we call the black hole of affordable housing — can’t get out,” she said. “I can’t afford this lifestyle in New Castle.”

New Castle is about an hour and a half away, a town on the interstate where housing prices are a lot cheaper.

Weekly Wrap: Janet Yellen cries hawk

Aug 26, 2016
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Molly Wood

Markets closed mixed after Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen said interest rates definitely, could, maybe go up in the next few to several months, probably. That kind of vagueness is nothing new.

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Donna Tam

The burkini just keeps making waves. France’s highest administrative court has made it possible to overturn the bans implemented on the full-body swimsuit, the BBC reported today.

The court said the ban  in one Mediterranean town "seriously and clearly illegally breached fundamental freedoms," and the ruling could set precedent for other towns with similar bans. The burkini covers everything, but a person’s hands, feet and face.

On today's show, we'll talk about the possible demise of ITT Tech; a billion-dollar hit to Japan's pension fund; and the Port of Houston's efforts to gain some post-Panamax traffic.

 

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Andy Uhler

The U.S. Department of Education said Thursday that ITT Educational Services – which is the parent company of ITT Technical Institutes – can’t use federal financial aid to enroll new students anymore. It’s the latest in the department’s move to assert closer regulation on for-profit colleges.

Houston spends millions to woo post-Panamax ships

Aug 26, 2016
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Gail Delaughter

The widened Panama Canal is likely to have a significant impact on global shipping. Here in the U.S., gigantic ships that could only fit on West Coast docks can now get through the canal to the Gulf of Mexico. That means a sizable increase in traffic for the Port of Houston — which has already begun a billion-dollar plan to upgrade its infrastructure.

A fully public Fed?

Aug 26, 2016
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Sabri Ben-Achour

The Fed is an odd bird.  The headquarters in D.C. is a federal agency, the regional branches are not. You can even tell by the email addresses. Headquarters' addresses usually end in .gov, regional Fed addresses end in .org. 

“The 12 regional banks are private institutions owned by the commercial banks ,” said Andrew Levin, professor of economics at Dartmouth.

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Amy Scott

As kids continue heading back to school, the new book "Policy Patrons" looks at what many see as the outsize role of private philanthropy in public education.

Groups like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation have spent billions of dollars to promote causes like high school and college completion, charter schools, and the Common Core standards.

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about why some want the Fed to change the way it operates; the role of private philanthropy in public education; and the fall opening of Prince's estate, Paisley Park.

Marketplace Tech for Friday, August 26, 2016

Aug 26, 2016
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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about technology's presence at Burning Man, a Nevada festival of art and self-expression; play this week's Silicon Tally with Tricia Berry, director of the Women in Engineering Program at the University of Texas at Austin; and look at how Nextdoor, the social network for neighborhoods, is aiming to get neighbors to do less racial profiling. 

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Dan Bobkoff

The residents of Kibera, in Nairobi,  have a message for foreign aid groups in their community: if you want us to come hear what you have to say, you need to pay us. 

So many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have flooded this poor area that many locals have become disillusioned by the foreigners who say they want to help. 

Frank Ocean and the business of really fancy music videos

Aug 25, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

Earlier this week, Frank Ocean released 17 songs as part of a new album, Blonde – his first in four years. But in the style a la Beyonce and Lemonade, Ocean also released a visual album called “Endless”…oh, an also, an oversized art magazine called “Boys Don’t Cry.” Multiple pop-up shops appeared in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and London.

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Kai Ryssdal

Update: According to the Associated Press, authorities in Rio are charging Lochte with making a false robbery report.

Ryan Lochte lost all his big sponsorship deals after his idiocy down in Brazil during the Olympics. Today, you might say he's failing upward, or something.

What's behind Uber's $1.2 billion loss

Aug 25, 2016

You know what's worse than losing a million dollars? Losing a billion dollars.

But a report today says Uber managed to lose a billion dollars in just the first half of this year.

The Bloomberg report also says Uber isn't profitable in the U.S. this quarter, in part because of its ongoing price battles with rival Lyft.

Kai Ryssdal spoke with Marketplace's senior tech correspondent Molly Wood to see what's behind the loss. 

Like any business, revenue drop hurts RNC

Aug 25, 2016
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Kim Adams

The Republican National Committee has had one of its worst fundraising months in recent years. There are many theories as to why: the candidate, the media, the donors, and more.

But no matter the reason, the truth is that the RNC is like any business; when there's less money coming in, there's less business it can do. That means fewer voter registration drives, fewer ads, and less staff support for the campaign of the party's presidential nominee — this election, that's Donald Trump.

Could we have prevented Zika?

Aug 25, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Seems like there’s a new scary disease every year—two years ago Ebola’s hemorrhagic fever and this year Zika’s misshapen baby heads. Zoonotic diseases like these have cost the world billions of dollars and millions of lives.  Earlier this month, the CDC issued its first travel warning in the continental U.S for mosquito-born Zika in Miami Florida.

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