Marketplace

M-F 6:30 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: Major U.S. airlines are the subject of a federal investigation by the Department of Justice looking into whether they may be illegally coordinating to keep ticket prices up. More on that. Plus, we'll talk about New York City's ban on so-called “poor doors,” the separate entrances to mixed-income buildings that were to be used by lower-income residents. Plus, a conversation with Elizabeth Holmes, who at 31 is the youngest female, self-made multi-billionaire in America, according to Forbes.

U.S. rice growers want to get in on Cuba

10 hours ago
Tracey Samuelson

The U.S. will open an embassy in Havana, Cuba — so said President Barack Obama Tuesday, a significant step showing that efforts to normalize relations with Cuba are ticking along. However, the embargo still stands and only Congress can lift it. Should that happen, many U.S. exporters will stand to benefit, including American rice farmers.

Ray Stoesser grows about 4,000 to 5,000 acres of rice on his Texas farm and would very much like to see some of it head to Cuba.

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, July 2, 2015

10 hours ago
Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: First up, we'll talk with Nathaniel Popper, author of "Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money," about whether or not the banking crisis in Greece is good for Bitcoin. And Matt Novak, who writes Gizmodo’s Paleofuture blog, joins us to talk about Back to the Future: Part 2 and the origins of our obsession with hoverboards.

Donna Karan leaves behind a fashion legacy

21 hours ago
Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

Over the last two decades, Donna Karan International has been one of the biggest brands in the fashion industry. Founder and chief designer Donna Karan announced on Tuesday that she was leaving her namesake company to focus on other projects.

Fashion journalist Kate Betts says that Karan has left a clear impact in the world of fashion.

“She designed for women in a way that was very sensuous and much more feminine than previous looks for women,” Betts says.  “It was a revelation for many professional women.”

Marketplace for Wednesday, July 1, 2015

23 hours ago

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Puerto Rico is in dire financial straits.  So what, you might shrug. Well, if any of your money is invested in a municipal bond fund, you might own Puerto Rican bonds, and they could take a hit. Marketplace's Adam Allington finds out who’s vulnerable. Next: Speaking today in Tennessee, President Obama will try to court conservative states to expand Medicaid under Obamacare. We unpack his sales pitch on using federal dollars to help states’ bottom lines.

The Obamacare sales pitch

23 hours ago
D Gorenstein

It’s been almost a week since the Supreme Court’s momentous ruling that further cements the Affordable Care Act as the law of the land, and Wednesday President Barack Obama flew to Nashville, Tennessee, to talk about health care.

While some consider this a bit of a victory lap, the president’s choice of Tennessee suggests it’s much more of an overture.

Checking in with the secretary of commerce

23 hours ago
Daisy Palacios and Kai Ryssdal

From the Export-Import Bank to the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal, a lot has been happening in the commerce world. We sat down with Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker to discuss the latest commerce news.

The Export-Import bank officially closed Tuesday — a move Pritzker wants reversed. 

“We need to re-establish and reauthorize the Export-Import Bank. This is a critical tool to keep U.S. businesses competitive in the global economy," Pritzker says.   

U.S. investors could take a hit on Puerto Rican bonds

23 hours ago
Adam Allington

The tiny island of Puerto Rico, the U.S territory in the Caribbean, is being called “America’s Greece” by some.

Like Greece, Puerto Rico has more debt than it can pay back, upwards of $70 billion, and now it’s asking its creditors for a restructuring of that debt.

Unlike Greece, Puerto Rico isn’t talking about abandoning the dollar, but U.S. investors do stand to take a sizeable hit if the territory defaults on its loan obligations.

Ford and Chrysler sales kicked into gear for June

23 hours ago
Mark Garrison

Two of the Big Three American automakers — Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Ford Motor Co. — are reporting nice gains in their June sales, according to numbers out Wednesday. A stronger job market and easy access to credit are spurring many Americans to trade up from the older cars in their garages.

But that’s not the only reason carmakers are happy these days. A booming housing market is also a factor: contractors are breaking ground on more homes, which means they’re buying more trucks.

Jeff Tyler

Just like the lottery, sports contracts can pay more when the profits are spread out over time. For example, let’s consider two of, arguably, the most bone-headed (or brilliant?) sports contracts of all time. The deal to fold the St. Louis Spirits has been called one of the best sports deals of all time. The contract has been so profitable that it’s used as a textbook example by business school professors. During basketball season, the deal inspires sports reporters to ask, “Would you believe a team that doesn’t exist still makes $17 million a year?”

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