Here & Now

M-Th 1-3p & F 1-2p
Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here & Now is an exciting daily news magazine hosted by veteran journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson. The program is designed to reflect the fluid world of news as it's happening, with timely, smart and in-depth reporting and conversation. It's produced by NPR News, WBUR Boston and a consortium of 12 public radio stations that includes WUNC.

Hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
Credit WBUR

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

A Claim That Electric Cars Aren't Green Fuels Firestorm

An electric charging station is seen on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 in Montpelier, Vt. (Toby Talbot/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:10 pm

Plug-in electric cars have lower greenhouse gas emissions than the average gas-guzzling vehicle.

But conservationist Ozzie Zehner argues in a piece called “Unclean at Any Speed“ that electric cars may be worse for the environment than traditional gas-powered cars.

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NPR Story
4:28 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Hedge Fund Pleads Not Guilty To Fraud Charges

General Council for SAC Capital Advisors LP, Peter Nussbaum exits Manhattan federal court, Friday, July 26, 2013, in New York. (Louis Lanzano/AP)

Prosecutors said a large volume of evidence including electronic messages, court-ordered wiretaps and consensual recordings is stacked against a Connecticut-based hedge fund that pleaded not guilty Friday to criminal charges accusing it of letting insider trading flourish for more than a decade.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Antonia Apps told a federal judge in Manhattan that investigators had “voluminous” evidence against SAC Capital Advisors, a Stamford, Conn.-based firm owned by billionaire Steven A. Cohen.

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NPR Story
3:05 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Film Critic Makes Acting Debut In 'Computer Chess'

Film critic Gerald Peary plays Pat Henderson in the new film “Computer Chess.” (YouTube)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:25 pm

It’s probably safe to say most professional film critics feel quite comfortable scrutinizing movies in darkened theaters.

But Gerald Peary, a longtime reviewer for the now-defunct Alternative News Weekly, the Boston Phoenix and other national publications, recently made a bold leap to the other side of the camera.

His acting debut is in “Computer Chess”, a quirky new feature by indie filmmaker Andrew Bujalski.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Andrea Shea of WBUR has the story.

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NPR Story
3:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

A-Rod Wants To Play, Yankees Refuse

New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez speaks to reporters after his second rehab baseball game with the Charleston RiverDogs, against the Rome Braves in Charleston, S.C., Wednesday, July 3, 2013. (Chuck Burton/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:25 pm

Alex Rodriguez, still recovering from an injury, issued a statement early yesterday asking to be activated for Friday’s game against the Tampa Bay Rays, but the Yankees declined.

When asked by WFAN radio if he still trust the Yankees, A-Rod said, “You know, I’d rather not get into that.”

NPR’s Mike Pesca joins us to explain what’s going on off the baseball diamond.

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NPR Story
3:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

The Impact Of Seeing Disaster Videos Over And Over

A screenshot from a video of the train derailment in Spain. (YouTube)

The train derailment in Spain is the latest in a series of disasters this year that have been caught on video and been played over and over again in the media.

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

New Music: From Parisian Blues To American Pop

The members of the Washington, D.C. band Misun. (Misun)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:25 pm

KCRW’s DJ Travis Holcombe joins us regularly to play some of the music that’s been catching his ear.

Today, he brings us songs by French-born Don Cavalli, British band Temples, North Carolina singer-songwriter Jackson Scott and D.C. pop trio Misun.

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

If Detroit Went Bankrupt, Why Is Philadelphia Paying?

An empty field north of Detroit's downtown, Oct. 24, 2012. (Carlos Osorio/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:25 pm

When Detroit filed for bankruptcy last week, city comptrollers and treasurers around the country held their collective breaths. That’s because cities, it turns out, don’t file for bankruptcy in a vacuum.

Philadelphia is already feeling the effects of Detroit’s bankruptcy.

That city will pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional interest costs over the next 20 years because the interest rate on Philly’s new $197 million bond offering is going up a quarter percent.

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

London Marks One-Year Anniversary Of The Olympics

Inside the London Olympic Stadium in April 2012. (jeffowenphotos/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:25 pm

A new poll shows two-thirds of UK residents believe the country got its money’s worth from the Olympics, even though the $13 billion cost was three times the original budget.

London is celebrating the one-year anniversary of the games this weekend with a big international track and field meet in the Olympic Stadium, featuring Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt.

The BBC’s Alex Capstick looks at the legacy of the London Olympics.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

An Argument Against Standing Desks

(Pace McCulloch)

One office worker says he enjoys sitting and he’s tired of the “superior moral attitude” from the standers around him.

Writer Ben Crair told Here & Now he accepts the medical studies showing that sitting at your desk is bad for your health. His objection to standing is based on “the pure satisfaction I get from sitting,” he said.

He argues there are other solutions to the health problem of sitting too long.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

New Alzheimer's Research Could Lead To Treatments

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Feb. 6, 2012. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

A new report in the journal Nature shows a significant step forward in figuring out what causes things to go wrong in the brain early on in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research could lead to new treatments.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is projected to triple by 2050. So there’s urgent demand for treatments — or even better, a cure — but so far, there has been little progress on that front.

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