Will Michaels

Daily News Producer

Will Michaels started his professional radio career at WUNC.

He was first an intern while studying at UNC-Chapel Hill. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC after graduation in 2010 as the producer for the local broadcast of Morning Edition, rising before the sun to help host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He joined the team for The State of Things later that year.

In 2016, Will became WUNC's first Daily News Producer, creating content for WUNC newscasts and periodically filling in as host for Morning Edition or All Things Considered.

Outside of radio, Will holds a seat on the board of the North Carolina Governor's School Alumni Association. He attended Governor's School in 2005 for drama, and still considers himself a theatre geek at heart.

Ways to Connect

Greensboro Police Department

The Greensboro city council says state officials should revoke the law enforcement license and reconsider charges against a white police officer who violated the department's use-of-force policy in a confrontation with a black man.

Charlotte shooting protesters
Chuck Burton / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Charlotte's police chief says video footage of the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott does not show 'definitive evidence' that Scott pointed a gun at officers before he was fatally shot.

photo of a unisex bathroom sign
Tombe / Wikipedia

A third Republican lawmaker said the North Carolina General Assembly should call a special session to revise or repeal House Bill 2. 

Jarrett Campbell / Flickr Creative Commons

The NCAA's decision to pull championship events out of North Carolina leaves a handful of cities without coveted college sports games, and the economic benefits that come with them.

Greensboro and Cary, in particular, expect to lose $14.6 million and $2 million in revenue, respectively.

red wolf
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Federal wildlife regulators want to scale back the red wolf recovery program in northeastern North Carolina. 

The Fish and Wildlife Service issued a decision Monday on its two-year review of the 30-year-old program. The red wolf was the first endangered species reintroduced to the wild in 1987.

A photo of the North Carolina band Balsam Range
Courtesy of Balsalm Range

The National Folk Festival gets underway in Greensboro on Friday night, marking the three-day festival's second year in the Triad. 

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory
Hal Goodtree / Flickr Creative Commons

The North Carolina Chamber is again denying any involvement with helping to write the controversial state law known as HB2.

"The North Carolina Chamber had no part in suggesting, drafting or reviewing House Bill 2 and anyone who suggests otherwise is misrepresenting the facts," the Chamber said in statement Thursday.

patmccrory / YouTube

Gov. Pat McCrory has released a campaign ad that pushes back against the outcry over North Carolina's HB2.

Photo of Felicia Reeves
Suzan Bayorgeon

Prosecutors in North Carolina and New Jersey are reopening the case of Felicia Reeves, a western North Carolina woman who was found dead in New Jersey last year.

Authorities originally concluded that Reeves had taken her own life in a motel room, but Reeves had claimed to be a police informant, raising questions about whether someone would have wanted her dead.

There is no evidence that police in New Jersey followed that lead during their investigation of Reeves' death.

police block a road entering Cedar Key, Fla.
John Raoux / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Updated Saturday 9:00 p.m.

Dare County Emergency Management says all major roads and bridges are now open. Flooding was worse than expected, as the back end of Hermine came through the Outer Banks. Ferries are expected to begin operating on Sunday, and the mandatory evacuation of visitors will likely be lifted.

Cover of "Another Brooklyn"
Jacqueline Woodson

In the late 1960s, Jacqueline Woodson and her family moved north from the segregated South to Brooklyn, New York.

It was a racially formative time and place that would later be known as the last wave of the Great Migration.

But at the time, Jacqueline simply knew Brooklyn as home. It was the place where she and her friends grew from children into adults, and shared the best and worst of a city that had become a vibrant destination for people of color.

"The Physics of Life" by Adrian Bejan
Adrian Bejan

What is life and its meaning?

That question has perplexed philosophers and other theoretical scientists for centuries.

They have sought both spiritual and intellectual guidance to come up with intricate conclusions for what it means to be alive.

But mechanical engineer Adrian Bejan says there is a much simpler conclusion: physics.

The old well at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.
Tim Schleicher / flickr, Creative Commons

Legislative leaders are at odds with environmentalists over a new policy initiative at UNC-Chapel Hill.

The state budget sets aside $1 million for scientists to conduct environmental research and make public policy recommendations. But some professors worry about potential ties to the legislature that could pressure them to sway their findings for political gain.

Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC's Dave DeWitt about the new program, which has been dubbed the North Carolina Policy Collaboratory.

LaVare Leith Foundation

 

An organization in Durham is running what is believed to be the only sober living center for LGBT people in the South. 

LaVare's House, which was established by the LaVare Leith Foundation in 2014, has nine beds for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people who are recovering from drug and alcohol addiction.

Roy Cooper and Pat McCrory
File photo / WUNC

Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and his Democratic challenger Roy Cooper outlined their economic visions today to a room full of business leaders in Pinehurst.

photo of Wildin Acosta
Courtesy of the Acosta family

Attorneys for a Durham teenager who is being held at an immigration detention center in Georgia say they expect him to be released soon. 

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

Local elections boards are raising questions about how to restore the early voting period after a court ruling struck down North Carolina's newest elections law.

Willy Somma

Durham native Heather Havrilesky has spent most of her professional life as a social commentator of sorts. 

She has written online cartoons about the absurdity of life, reviews of crappy TV reality shows, and columns about why we love crappy TV reality shows.

It is perhaps no wonder that she has become a successful advice columnist.

Havrilesky is the writer behind "Ask Polly," a weekly column in New York magazine in which she guides readers through existential questions.

Photo of Mike Pence and Pat McCrory
Evan Vucci / AP

With a little more than three months until the 2016 elections, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is facing strong backlash—even from some fellow Republicans—​against his latest verbal onslaught, in which he attacked the parents of a fallen soldier.

The controversy comes as Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton opens a sizable post-convention lead in most polls. Will this latest controversy affect Trump's chances in North Carolina? And what effect could it have on Gov. Pat McCrory, who has campaigned with Trump in the state?

Photo of Mamie Neugent
David Spear

​In the late 1980s and early 90s, North Carolina photographer David Spear spent several years documenting the lives of his neighbors, the Neugents.

The family owned a tobacco farm in Rockingham County, and his photos depicted their attempts to keep their tobacco farm alive at a time when many others were dying. He described the Neugents as "fabulous people" who "raise hell, and they don't try to hide it."

Ken Ilgunas

This program originally aired on April 21, 2016.

Ken Ilgunas was working as a dishwasher near the oil refineries of Alaska when his friend suggested they should hike the entire length of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.

He immediately agreed, and a year later he started the journey from Alberta, Canada to the Gulf Coast of Texas on foot.

Jay Price / WUNC

It is a long-standing tradition for presidential candidates to address the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention in election years.

This year, the event is in North Carolina, a key swing state. That is especially appealing to the candidates in this election because veterans regularly vote in larger numbers than other voters. 

But this year, veterans are not enthusiastic about their choice in either party.

a thermometer surpassing 100 degrees farenheit
Joe Chung / https://flic.kr/p/4PeJ6U

North Carolina is in the midst of an extreme, extended heat wave. Heat index values are expected to be as high as 105 degrees in some parts of the state.

That much heat can make it dangerous to be outside, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Gail Hartfield.

Diana Matthews / Algonquin Books

This program originally aired April 4, 2016

Lee Smith started writing stories when she was nine years old and sold them for a nickel a piece.

Many of them were inspired by the gossip, true stories and daily grind she observed at her father's dime store, deep in the coal mining mountains of Virginia.

Governor Pat McCrory
Hal Goodtree / Flickr Creative Commons

The NBA announced that the 2017 All-Star Game will not be held in Charlotte as planned.

The decision comes after state lawmakers did not make enough changes to the law known as House Bill 2 to satisfy the league. It could cost the state more than $100 million in economic impact and the decision will be a factor in the gubernatorial race between incumbent Gov. Pat McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper.

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