Phoebe Judge

Host / Reporter

Phoebe Judge is an award-winning journalist whose work has been featured on a numerous national radio programs. She regularly conducts interviews and anchors WUNC's broadcast of Here & Now. Previously, Phoebe served as producer, reporter and guest host for the nationally distributed public radio program The Story. Earlier in her career, Phoebe reported from the gulf coast of Mississippi. She covered the BP oil spill and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina for Mississippi Public Broadcasting and National Public Radio. Phoebe's work has won multiple Edward R. Murrow and Associated Press awards. Phoebe was born and raised in Chicago and is graduate of Bennington College and the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

She is a co-founder of the podcast Criminal.

Ways to Connect

UNC and Duke are hosting edit-a-thons in hopes of diversifying Wikipedia's edting pool.
screenshot from wikipedia.org

Women have their fingerprints all over the history of mankind, but men have had a larger role in filling the pages of history books. 

Fire Pink Trio recently released their first album, "Poetry in Motion."
Melanie Hatton / Firepinktrio.com

The classical music group Fire Pink Trio gets its name from the vibrant mountain wildflower that grows throughout North America.

They bring the same energy and creative force to their work, from the classics of Brahms to the contemporary pieces of North Carolina composer Dan Locklair. And their experience as educators allows them to pass on the sound to the next generation of classical musicians. The trio released a debut album last month: Poetry in Motion: Music for Flute, Viola, and Harp. 

A picture of a coal ash pond.
Waterkeeper Alliance

    

This week, Duke Energy has paid $171 million to shareholders and the state of North Carolina.

The first bill was for $146 million to settle a lawsuit that claimed the company misled shareholders when it agreed to a merger with Progress Energy in 2012. The other $25 million was a fine from the state for spilling coal ash at a power plant in Wilmington.

Meanwhile, the conversation continues about how to dispose of the coal ash sitting at 14 sites across the state.

Guest host Phoebe Judge gets an update from WUNC environment reporter Dave DeWitt.

J.B. Buxton
J.B. Buxton

    

J.B. Buxton began his career in education in an unlikely place: South Africa.

As a Morehead Scholar from UNC, Buxton taught in a South African school as apartheid began to crumble. The experience shaped Buxton's perspective on education and launched his long career in education policy.

He served as education advisor to Governor Easley and as Deputy State Superintendent of the North Carolina Schools. Buxton now leads the move for a charter school to serve Southeast Raleigh's neediest students.

Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology Christine Drea upclose with a hyena
Kathy Moorhouse / http://dukemagazine.duke.edu

Some of the world’s top animal behaviorists are leading a groundbreaking study of lions and hyenas for the Smithsonian Channel series Killer IQ: Lions vs. Hyena.

David Joy's new book tells the story of a young man working for his father's meth ring in rural North Carolina.
David-Joy.com

Jacob McNeely grew up in the mountains of North Carolina.

A life of crime as an employee of his father's meth ring is the only one he has ever known. But a violent event and a reunion with his first love offer McNeely the possibility of escape. 

Hands being held.
flickr.com/photos/mabeljuillet/

How do we die?

For some death comes suddenly, and there is no time for preparation, but for others death slowly creeps up on us. Though it is inevitable, we often avoid the opportunity to prepare for it.

Gov. Pat McCrory
Governor's Office

    

Gov. Pat McCrory filed new forms with the State Ethics Commission that show previously undisclosed travel expenses. 

The governor now says outside groups paid for seven of his trips in 2013, totaling more than $13,000. The money comes from appearances at national governors' conferences, including four backed by the Republican Party. 

The governor says it is appropriate for those groups to pay for his travel. Critics say failure to show the expenses on the original form follows a pattern of nondisclosure at the governor's office.

"The Last Barn Dance" tells the story of North Carolina dairy farmer Randy Lewis.
Ted Richardson and Jason Arthurs

    

Randy Lewis' dairy farm has been a gathering place for the people of Eli Whitney, N.C., for more than 50 years.

His family's annual barn dances are living relics of simpler times in North Carolina's agricultural industry.

But the Great Recession forced farmers to find new ways to save those traditions. Many went out of business. Lewis and a handful of others stopped falling further into debt by bottling their own milk. But it remains to be seen whether cultural traditions like the barn dance will stay alive.

Oysters On The Rise

Mar 10, 2015
North Carolina's oyster sales doubled between 2005 and 2012.
Miwok / Flickr Creative Commons

  

Oyster growers, researchers and enthusiasts gather in Raleigh today and tomorrow for the North Carolina Oyster Summit.

Food writer and oyster expert Rowan Jacobsen will give the event's keynote address on the rise of oysterculture in the southeastern U.S. and North Carolina. He wrote a book, A Geography of Oysters: the Connoisseur's Guide to Oyster Eating in North America (Bloomsbury USA/2007).

Governor Pat McCrory unveiled his budget plan yesterday.

Education tops the governor's priority list but critics say it doesn't go far enough. Meanwhile, in Washington, Senate democrats are calling for a vote on North Carolina native Loretta Lynch's confirmation as attorney general. Both North Carolina senators have pledged to vote against her confirmation. 

Kevin Spacey plays southern politician Frank Underwood in the Netflix series "House of Cards."
Wikimedia Commons

In the Netflix hit series, House of Cards, Kevin Spacey plays a politician from Gaffney, South Carolina named Frank Underwood.

The fictional president has a heavy southern accent, but some question its authenticity. Vox.com produced a popular video analyzing Spacey's "r-dropping."

Cover art for Silent Lunch's most recent EP, Late to Bloom. Album art by Julienne Alexander.
Julienne Alexander

Durham’s Silent Lunch is a punk trio that plays music that they describe as “abrasive, sweet, brutal and tender.”

Their stiff upper-lip approach to music can be felt through their straight-ahead drumming, a purposeful gracelessness on guitar and lyrics delivered with a take-it-or-leave-it flair.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with Silent Lunch: Emily O’Sullivan, bassist and vocalist; Kaitie Hereford, drummer; and Hannah Spector, guitarist and vocalist about their music and they perform live. 

Governor Pat McCrory released his budgetary agenda today.
Wikimedia Commons

    

Governor Pat McCrory set forth his budgetary agenda today.

The proposed budget included emphasis on increased educational spending. The most recent projections show a $270 million shortfall, but state budget director Lee Roberts says the deficit is small relative to the overall budget.

The legislature will consider the governor's proposal in the next few weeks.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with Roberts about the budget priorities. 

Supreme Court building, Washington, DC, USA. Front facade.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Daderot

The U.S Supreme Court will take up a case this week that potentially puts half a million North Carolinians at risk of losing their subsidized health insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

In King v. Burwellthe high court will examine whether the federal government can assist in paying insurance premiums for all Americans or if it can only offer funds in states that have created their own health care exchanges.

    

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of key moments in the civil rights movement, including Bloody Sunday and the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

John F. Blair Publisher

  

Known in North Carolina as the "Barbecue Man," Bob Garner shares his love of the state's favorite food through recipe books, restaurant reviews, and regular segments on UNC-TV's North Carolina Weekend, where some foods get his stamp of approval: "Mmm-mmm."

But his newest book takes readers on a culinary trip around the state from the little-known Neuse River Fish Stew and Ocracoke Fig Cake to the classic Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, Texas Pete hot sauce and Mount Olive pickles.

Protesters disrupt UNC board debate about poverty center.
https://twitter.com/adv_project

Over the protests of students, the UNC Board of Governors moved forward with tuition and fee increases, as well as the controversial decision to close three academic centers in UNC system.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with WUNC reporter Dave Dewitt about the decisions and the outcries from faculty and students about the Center on Poverty, Work, and Opportunity at UNC Chapel Hill; the Center for Biodiversity at East Carolina; and the Institute for Civic Engagement and Social Change at North Carolina Central.

Ambassador Thomas Pickering
Wikipedia

  

Ambassador Thomas Pickering began his career in the foreign service more than 40 years ago. He has served as ambassador to many countries including Jordan, El Salvador, Israel, Nigeria, India and the Russian Federation.

He served as the United States ambassador to the United Nations and as undersecretary of state for political affairs at the State Department. Recently, Ambassador Pickering led the department panel’s investigation into the 2012 attack in Benghazi.

University of Georgia students and faculty standing in solidarity with the victims of the Chapel Hill shooting.
@athens4everyone / Twitter

In the days since the triple homicide of Chapel Hill residents Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha and Razan Abu-Salha, two hashtags have surged through social media feeds: #chapelhillshooting and #muslimlivesmatter.

Demonstrators in Qatar march on Sunday February 15, 2015.
SilverEnvelope / Twitter

Several thousand demonstrators took part in a march in Qatar on Sunday to show solidarity with the families of the North Carolina victims Deah Barakat, his wife Yusor Abu-Salha, and her 19-year-old sister Razan Abu-Salha.

BBC

On Tuesday, three individuals were murdered near the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.  All three were Muslim. 

Almost immediately, the story began spreading across the world, gaining international traction with #MuslimLivesMatter and #ChapelHillShooting. 

KKK members take weapons from the back of a car prior to the shooting between them and members of the Workers Viewpoint Organization/Communist Workers Party on Nov. 3, 1979.
News & Record file photo

In 1979 a clash between white supremacist groups and protestors in Greensboro left five dead and 12 badly injured.   The incident gained national attention and over the past 36 years the city has undergone a number of programs to try and provide some reconciliation.  But a new move by the North Carolina Highway Advisory Marker Committee is drawing some controversy. 

brick building Laurinburg, Scotland County, N.C.
Lance McCord / Flickr/Creative Commons

The North Carolina Legislature is back in town and ready to get to work for the year.  During this "long session" lawmakers will likely take up a number of important topics including Medicaid and teacher pay.  But what do you do if you represent a county that is oftentimes overlooked?

Representative Ken Goodman does just that.  Goodman represents Scotland County which is in one of the poorest parts of the state.

Route 12 on Hatteras Island was cut in five locations by Hurricane Irene.
Steve Helber / AP

The National Hurricane Center will be providing new warnings about storm surge starting next year. 

In the past, hurricane warnings have been issued based on wind predictions. Now, storm surge will be taken into account as well.

Jamie Rhome of the National Hurricane Center says that is especially important for states like North Carolina.

"I can't just say that storm surge is going to be bad in North Carolina because in some places it is going to catastrophic and in the next community over it might not be so bad," Rhome says.

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