Nicole Campbell

Producer, "The State of Things"

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The State of Things
10:34 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Hofmann Forest

J.V. Hofmann and class measuring pine in reed bed at Hofmann Forest, about 1937. .
Credit Historical State, NCSU Libraries

News and Observer reporter Renee Elder weighs the pros and cons of NCSU selling Hoffman Forest

  The Hofmann Forest is referred to as the "crown jewel" of forestry research in North Carolina, and it’s one of the main educational sites for forestry students.

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The State of Things
10:45 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Midwifery In North Carolina

WUNC's Capitol Bureau Chief Jessica Jones discusses pending policy to allow midwifery in North Carolina

An increasing number of families each year in the United States decide to have home births. But in North Carolina, having a home birth conducted by a single Certified Professional Midwife is illegal.

Republican Senators are seeking to decriminalize Certified Professional Midwife practices as well as build a licensing process for midwives.They've recently introduced the Home Birth Freedom Act and a move to decriminalize direct entry midwifery.The bills have received a lot of criticism for allowing midwives without nursing credentials to practice independently. WUNC's Capitol Bureau Chief, Jessica Jones, joins Host Frank Stasio to discuss the perspectives surrounding Senate Bills 106 and 017.

The State Of Things
11:36 am
Thu March 7, 2013

A Look Back At The 1968 Poor People’s Campaign And How We Create Black And Brown Unity Today

Power to the Poor: Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974
Credit gordonmantler.com

A conversation about the Poor Peoples Campaign, then and now.

The assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968 often overshadows what may be his most radical crusade. The Poor People’s Campaign in the spring of 1968 was organized by a coalition of predominately Black and Brown organizers working across the color line.

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The State of Things
10:34 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Former Nun Reflects On The Sanctuary Movement

Credit hrcr.org

Frank Stasio talks with Darlene Nicgorski

Darlene Nicgorski was a nun when she was convicted of conspiracy and faced a 25-year prison term in the 1980s for her work helping Central American refugees. She didn’t end up having to serve that term, but her work in the so-called Sanctuary Movement made her the poster child of immigrant activism in the 1980s.

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The State of Things
11:17 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Exploring Gaps In America's Food System From The Farm To The Table

Black farmers protest at Lafayette Park across from the White House in Washington, D.C. on September 22, 1997. Protesters alleged the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) denied black farmers equal access to farm loans and assistance based on their race. North Carolina farmer Timothy Pigford and 400 other black farmers filed the Pigford v. Glickman (Pigford I) class-action lawsuit against USDA in 1997. The USDA settled Pigford I in 1999.
Credit USDA photo by Anson Eaglin / flickr

A panel of experts discuss food justice

Starvation is often considered a problem distant from the American experience. But for many United States citizens, hunger is a way of life. And many of them live right here in North Carolinians.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, about 636,000 households in the state have been labeled “food insecure” within the past year. This means that over 17 percent of our families lack consistent access to nutritious food. Families hit hardest by food insecurity are Black, Latino and homes led by single mothers.

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The State of Things
12:27 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Muslim Women Speak Up About the Veil

Credit Adam Jones / flickr.com

Women Speak Up About the Veil

Rarely do articles of clothing receive as much attention as the Muslim headscarf does in the 2000s. In quite a strange twist, the glances and questions that women who wear the headscarf, in non-Muslim majority societies receive is many times in contradiction with one of the purposes of the veil, which is to not draw attention to oneself.

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The State of Things
12:11 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Celebrating The Man Who Recorded The World

Alan Lomax with James (Son) Thomas, Delta Blues Festival, Greenville, Mississippi, 1979. Photo by Bill Ferris.
Credit culturalequity.org

Bill Ferris and Nathan Salsburg join Isaac-Davy Aronson to discuss the legacy of Alan Lomax

Alan Lomax dedicated seven decades of his life to recording and distributing the sound of as much of the globe as he could reach. Beginning as a 17-year-old from Austin, Texas, Alan traveled with his father, John Lomax, to plantations, farms and prisons in the deep South.

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The State of Things
11:51 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Remembering Chapel Hill's 1970s And 80s Feminist Children's Book Press

Members of Lollipop Power Inc, with their publications.
Credit Photo Given by Marjorie Fowler

A discussion with founding members of Lollipop Power Inc.

  When you opened up a children’s book in the 1960s, chances are you saw girls in pink playing with dolls and boys in blue going on adventures. And most of the characters were probably white.

A group of women in Chapel Hill, many of them mothers and academics, decided they wanted to see more diverse and empowering images in children’s literature and took matters into their own hands. This collective became the printing press known as Lollipop Power Inc.

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The State of Things
11:23 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Artist's Exhibit Explores The History Of Slavery Through Her Ancestry

'Bloodlines' art by Toni Scott
Credit unc.edu

  As a young person, Toni Scott was inspired by stories passed down of her great-grandmother Fannie. Her exploration of her maternal line led her to grapple with the violence of slavery and African-American oppression.

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The State of Things
11:29 am
Mon February 4, 2013

How Former Museum Director's Struggle For Access to Education Led Her to the Triangle

Betsy Bennett
Credit naturalsciences.org

Meet Betsy Bennett

  Meet Betsy Bennett: Betsy Bennett recently retired from two decades as the director for the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. It's was part of her longer history as an educator and politician in the South. Betsy got her start training teachers in Charlottesville, Virginia on how to integrate their classrooms. She also helped desegregate Charlotte schools before heading to the Natural Sciences Museum and growing it to one of the most successful in the country. Betsy joins our host Frank Stasio to talk about her life history in education.

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